Tom McClintock

Tom McClintock

CALIFORNIA's 4th DISTRICT

H.R. 1 – House Tax Reform Bill: NO

2017/11/16

H.R. 1 – House Tax Reform Bill: NO
 
I am convinced that the business side of this bill will produce dramatic growth for the national economy.  However, I believe the personal income tax side does significant harm, particularly to many families in high-cost, high-tax states like California.  
 
This was entirely avoidable, if higher priority had been given to family tax relief than was given to tax simplification.  The current major deductions for such expenses as mortgage interest, state and local income taxes, medical and casualty expenses and student loan interest could all have been retained in the bill, while still providing a significant, across-the-board reduction in all tax rates, assuring that no taxpayer was left behind.
 
Unfortunately, the amendment that I offered to do so failed, and despite many discussions, I have yet to receive assurances that the final bill will protect every taxpayer against tax increases.   
 
I favor a flat tax, but families make the most important financial decisions in their lives based in part – sometimes in large part -- on the tax deductions available to them.  Transitioning to a flat tax requires a very gradual phase-out of deductions over a long period of time to prevent trapping taxpayers in a bait-and-switch world where deductions they had counted on suddenly disappear.  This bill ignores that necessity.
 
This is particularly harmful to Californians who suffer under policies that have grossly inflated the cost of housing.  Even though the mortgage interest deduction is grandfathered for existing mortgages, the limitation will make home ownership less affordable for future home buyers and devalue the asset for current homeowners.  Yes, that will cause home prices to decline, but for all the wrong reasons.
 
The state and local tax deduction is removed under this bill, further disproportionately affecting Californians.  The rationale is that taxpayers in low-tax states subsidize the high spending in liberal states.  But this ignores a central tenet of federalism: that governments closest to the people should make most of the decisions and provide most of the services, and thus have first call on tax revenues – the federal government is supposed to get in line behind them.  The bill turns this principle on its head and amounts to a double-taxation of every dollar government claims from family earnings. 
 
Other provisions permanently eliminate personal tax exemptions, replacing them with a personal tax credit.  Unfortunately, the credit goes away in five years, meaning that many families seeing a tax cut this year may end up paying higher taxes in future years.  The Joint Committee on Taxation estimates that nearly one fifth of families earning between $75,000 and $100,000 will see an average $500 annual tax increase by 2027.
 
It is claimed that the average taxpayer will see their taxes reduced.  This invokes the mystery of the 6-foot man who drowned in a pond whose average depth was 5-feet.  It is undeniable that a significant portion of taxpayers will see an increase in their taxes, particularly in California, and particularly over time as the temporary relief provisions phase out.
 
Nor are the personal income tax provisions likely to produce much economic growth.  Productivity occurs at the marginal rate – how much your next dollar is taxed.  By leaving the top marginal tax at 39.6 percent – and indeed, creating a new bubble bracket of 46 percent -- the economic advantages are severely limited. 
 
Congress has refused to cut spending, and spending drives both debt and taxes. Economic growth is the only other way to address our approaching debt crisis.  Increasing the debt to produce growth is only justifiable if the tax reform maximizes growth potential.  The personal income tax provisions fall short.
 
These infirmities might still be justifiable in exchange for the positive economic impact of the business tax provisions in the bill.  Tragically, though, they are unnecessary and could easily have been fixed in a manner that guaranteed no taxpayer is made worse off.  
 
Proponents argue this is a work in progress and the bill can be improved in conference.  I hope that is the case and eagerly await it.  Unfortunately, the House must decide the merits of the bill before it today – not what might come to it in the future.  It is rare for the conference process to improve bills, and a commitment to provide taxpayer protections in the final version has not been forthcoming.  In this case, the Hippocratic oath makes for good legislative advice: “First, do no harm.”  Particularly for California, this bill fails that test.

 
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The Economy

2017/11/15

Click for Fiscal and Economic Issues

November 15, 2017 Speeches
This amendment assures that the tax reform bill leaves no taxpayer behind. It retains all the provisions on C-corporations and pass-throughs that are desperately needed to produce the kind of economic growth that our country is capable of. It strikes the provisions in the bill that change the personal income tax code and replaces them with a permanent, one percent across-the-board reduction in the rates in every bracket. This should fit within the existing budget authority and save an average family about $600 per year on their taxes.
November 10, 2017 Columns
In the last four national elections, Americans made it clear that we won’t accept the economic stagnation we’ve suffered during this past decade. Obama’s policies of higher taxes and greater regulatory burdens suppressed economic growth to a dismal 1 ½ percent annual average – about half the post-war growth rate of three percent.
November 8, 2017 Press Release
According to Arthur Laffer and Martin Feldstein, the business side of the tax reform will produce $5 trillion of growth over the next decade. MAGA! But we’re getting wrapped around the axle on the personal income tax side

 

Senate Amendments to the Budget

October 26, 2017 
Unsustainable government spending drives both taxes and debt. The budget resolution sets the spending architecture for the fiscal year. The House version provided for $200 billion of enforceable mandatory spending reductions over ten years and balanced within the decade.

 

October 4, 2017 
For the first time in many years, this budget uses the reconciliation process for the purpose it was intended: to bring mandatory spending under control.

 

September 8, 2017 Vote Notes on Legislation

Vote Note on H.R. 601

H.R. 601 – Three-month Debt Limit Suspension, $230 billion of general spending and $8 billion for Emergency Hurricane Relief.

 

The Senate's Choice

September 7, 2017 Speeches
Two weeks after the 2016 election, I spoke on the House floor and warned that the greatest single obstacle to meeting the expectations of the American people was the cloture rule in the Senate. I said: “Voters elected Republican majorities in both houses of Congress and they expect action. They’ll get it from the President and from the House. But in order for the Senate to rise to this occasion, it must reform its cloture rule when it organizes in January.” It didn’t.

 

September 6, 2017 Speeches
This amendment eliminates the $150 million of discretionary spending wasted on one of the least essential programs in the entire United States Government, the so-called “Essential Air Service.” That is the program that subsidizes empty and near-empty planes to fly from small airports to regional hubs just a few hours away or less by car.


NTLF Tax Colloquium

August 18, 2017 Speeches
Thank you for organizing this discussion on tax reform. I believe the most important mandate given to this administration and this Congress is to revive our economy. Our success or failure will largely be determined on achieving this objective and will be judged by the answer every American gives to Ronald Reagan’s question in both 1980 and 1984: “Are you better off than you were four years ago?

 

Budget for Fiscal Year 2018 - House Budget Committee

July 19, 2017 Speeches

On our current trajectory, the CBO warns that just four fiscal years from now – in 2022 – our annual deficits will surpass a trillion dollars. That’s where economists warn we run the risk of damage or even loss of our access to credit – a sovereign debt crisis.
 
 

April 27, 2017 Speeches
The last four elections have defined one of the most dramatic political realignments in our country’s history.  In those elections, we’ve seen a net shift of 64 U.S. House seats, 12 U.S. Senate seats, 10 governors, 919 state legislative seats and the presidency shift from Democrats to Republicans.  This happened in large part on three overarching mandates: revive the economy; secure our borders and repair our healthcare system.  If President Trump can accomplish these three objectives, his administration and this congress will be remembered as one of the most successful and beneficial in our nation’s history.

January 11, 2017 Speeches
In the last eight years, our nation’s debt has doubled. That means the Obama administration has borrowed as much money in eight years as our government borrowed in the 220 years between the first day of the George Washington administration until the last day of the George W. Bush administration.
December 8, 2016 Vote Notes on Legislation

Continuing Resolution to Fund the Government: Yes.  Hopefully, this is the last continuing resolution that we will see.  Like those before it, it spends too much, abandons Congress’ fundamental responsibility to superintend the nation’s finances, and circumvents the normal budget process.  But it also gets us out of the debt, doubt and despair of the Obama administration into the prosperity, hope and promise of the Trump era.

December 1, 2016 Speeches
President-elect Trump has many difficult fiscal tasks ahead – one of which is to promote long-overdue infrastructure construction at a time when the national debt exceeds our entire economy and interest costs alone are eating us alive. Some have said that a rebounding economy resulting from tax reform will pay for it. That may be, but it’s not guaranteed; it cannot be accurately forecast; and we’ll need any new revenues to beef up our defenses and reduce our deficit – two other critical objectives of the new administration.
September 28, 2016 Vote Notes on Legislation

Senate Amendment to HR 5325 – Fiscal Year 2017 Continuing Resolution: YES.  This bill avoids a government shutdown on October 1st by extending current spending authority through December 9th.  This is the WORST way to fund the government, because it fails to exercise congressional oversight through the budget and appropriations bills.  Unfortunately, sincere but poorly reasoned opposition from the “Freedom Caucus” blocked adoption of the budget this year and doomed legislative efforts to exercise that oversight.

September 8, 2016 Speeches
When we talk of PILT funding, we should never lose sight of the fact that it is a very, very poor substitute for revenues generated locally by healthy economic activity. Our ultimate objective should be not to institutionalize PILT funding, but to restore a healthy balance between federal land ownership and productive private ownership of the lands within each county in the nation.
September 7, 2016 Speeches
I want to thank Congressman Gohmert for organizing this discussion of federal lands policy, and to highlight the Federal Footprint Map at Naturalresources.house.gov/federalfootprint. Or just google Federal Footprint. When you do, you’ll have a complete picture of how much land the federal government owns and how much of your state and your community is affected. And it may surprise you.
June 16, 2016 Press Release

Washington, D.C.- For the second year in a row, the House of Representatives today overwhelmingly passed a bipartisan amendment offered by Rep. Jared Huffman (D-CA) and Rep. Tom McClintock (R-CA) to strike a congressional earmark from the 2017 Defense Appropriations Bill that would spend millions of dollars to ship Pennsylvania coal over 3,000 miles to American military bases in Germany. 

June 16, 2016 Press Release
This amendment forbids scarce defense dollars from being spent to fund two executive orders and several other provisions of law that require the military to squander billions of dollars on so-called “Green Energy.”
June 16, 2016 Press Release
I do not support the war on coal waged by this administration and my friends on the left. I DO support the war on waste, and I support this amendment based on that fiscal imperative.
June 9, 2016 Speeches
The House is expected to take up the “PROMESA” bill today, with serious implications to every taxpayer in the country.
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Leave No Taxpayer Behind - House Rules Committee - Amendment to Tax Bill

2017/11/15

Congressman McClintock offered an amendment to the tax bill and delivered the following remarks on the amendment at the House Rules Committee: 

Leave No Taxpayer Behind
House Rules Committee
November 14, 2017
 
Mr. Chairman:
 
This amendment assures that the tax reform bill leaves no taxpayer behind.  It retains all the provisions on C-corporations and pass-throughs that are desperately needed to produce the kind of economic growth that our country is capable of.  It strikes the provisions in the bill that change the personal income tax code and replaces them with a permanent, one percent across-the-board reduction in the rates in every bracket.  This should fit within the existing budget authority and save an average family about $600 per year on their taxes.
 
Tax simplification is a worthy and important goal, but given the complexities of the tax code and the time-table we’re operating under, this bill is yielding a number of unintended and undesirable consequences that are entirely unnecessary and avoidable.  
 
We are also working at cross purposes with our objective of tax relief for many families.  Limiting the mortgage interest deduction will disrupt housing markets, particularly in high-cost states.  Abolishing the deduction for state and local taxes means that many households in high tax states may see tax increases as a result of this measure.  Eliminating personal tax exemptions and phasing out the new personal tax credit means many families seeing a tax cut this year may end up paying higher taxes in future years.  The Joint Committee on Taxation estimates that nearly one fifth of families earning between $75,000 and $100,000 will see an average $500 annual tax increase by 2027.
 
The current measure not only fails to reduce the top marginal rate, it produces a new bubble bracket of 46 percent.  Economic growth depends on how much your next dollar is taxed.  That is the marginal rate.  By holding – indeed, increasing – the top marginal tax rate, we are needlessly limiting the stimulative effect of this measure. 
 
This amendment avoids all of these pitfalls and leaves no taxpayer behind.  It assures that whatever deductions or credits that a taxpayer currently claims – wherever they live and whatever financial decisions they have made – their taxes will go down by one percent of their taxable income.   Furthermore, by reducing all marginal rates, including the top rate, it maximizes the potential for economic growth.  
 
Finally, I believe this will cure the objections we hear from individuals and groups who have made investment decisions based on the current tax structure and that threaten passage of the overall reform.
 
As Haley Barbour likes to say, “The main thing is to keep the main thing the main thing.”  The main thing is not tax simplification.  The main thing is to unlock the potential of the American economy.  This bill -- restoring an internationally competitive corporate tax rate and providing concomitant relief for small businesses -- can do this.  Why imperil this vital objective with personal income tax provisions that are undercutting what would otherwise be overwhelming public support for this bill?   
 
I realize and appreciate all the work that has gone into making adjustments on the personal income tax provisions of this measure.  I would love to see a simpler tax code where most people could file their taxes on a post-card.  But considering the looming deadlines to enact the bill, the hyper-partisan political environment and the complications of making adjustments on the fly, I think we need to focus on the principal objectives of tax reform: economic growth and family tax relief.
 
That’s what this amendment does.  I earnestly ask the committee to make it in order. 
 
 
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Leave No Taxpayer Behind

2017/11/10

Leave No Taxpayer Behind
By Congressman Tom McClintock

In the last four national elections, Americans made it clear that we won’t accept the economic stagnation we’ve suffered during this past decade.  Obama’s policies of higher taxes and greater regulatory burdens suppressed economic growth to a dismal 1 ½ percent annual average – about half the post-war growth rate of three percent.  

Reagan averaged 3 ½ percent annual growth by reducing the tax and regulatory burdens crushing the economy.  The result: one of the greatest economic expansions in American history.  

The Trump Administration has made significant progress on regulatory relief, as attested by rising wages, employment opportunities and consumer confidence.  But tax relief is vital to finish the job.

The imperative should be clear.  The American corporate tax rate of 35 percent is the highest in the industrialized world.  True, lots of special interest loopholes to politically connected companies bring the average rate to 18.6 percent.  That’s precisely the problem: companies that haven’t gotten these breaks have fled the country – taking trillions of dollars and millions of American jobs overseas.  By closing the loopholes and lowering the rate to an internationally competitive 20 percent, economists tell us we can add $5 trillion to the American economy over the next decade (averaging $40,000 per family).

Those who dismiss this as “tax cuts for wealthy corporations” don’t understand the dirty little secret of corporate taxation: corporations don’t pay corporate taxes – they only collect them.  The only people who pay corporate taxes are consumers (through higher prices), employees (through lower wages) and investors (through lower earnings – think pensions and 401(k)’s).  Lowering the corporate tax rate not only means restoring America’s global competitiveness, it invariably translates into lower prices, higher wages and greater returns on savings and investments.

The personal income tax side is also important, and here, Congress is getting wrapped around the axle.

Simplifying America’s Byzantine tax code is needed and overdue – but every adjustment has the potential for unintended and often ugly consequences.  The Joint Committee on Taxation warned this week that while most families will see reductions in their tax burdens in the bill’s current draft, others (particularly in high-tax, high-cost states like California) will suffer increases, particularly over time.

Congress should leave no taxpayer behind.  Considering the looming deadlines to enact the bill, the hyper-partisan political environment and the complexities of the tax code itself, personal income tax simplification should wait for another day.

Congress should focus instead on the main objectives of tax reform: economic growth and tax relief for all families.  This means leaving the current personal income tax structure in place while providing a permanent, uniform across-the-board reduction in the rates for all tax brackets.  Using the current budget framework, we could reduce tax brackets between one and 1.35 percent, saving average families between $600 and $800 a year.  

Regardless of what deductions or credits a family currently claims, their taxes would be guaranteed to go down.  More importantly, this would reduce the marginal rate for all incomes, maximizing the benefit to the overall economy.  Productivity depends on how much your next dollar is taxed.  

The legislation that emerges from these deliberations will ultimately be judged by the prosperity it produces and the relief it brings to ALL American families.  If it’s done right, the tax reform now taking shape in Congress can deliver that day.  If it’s done wrong, we will have squandered the most important chance the American people have given us to materially improve their lives.

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Leave No Taxpayer Behind: Just Lower the Rates

2017/11/08

TO: Republican Colleagues
FM: Tom McClintock
RE: NO TAXPAYER LEFT BEHIND: JUST LOWER THE RATES
DT: November 8, 2017
 
Dear Colleague:
 
According to Arthur Laffer and Martin Feldstein, the business side of the tax reform will produce $5 trillion of growth over the next decade.  MAGA!
 
But we’re getting wrapped around the axle on the personal income tax side.  We’ve had several unpleasant surprises this week: the 46% bubble bracket and now the JCT report that, over time, many in the middle class may end up paying higher income taxes.
 
Yes, the average taxpayer will pay less – but this raises the mystery of the 6-foot man who drowned in a pond whose average depth was 5-feet.  It is now clear that some families will see tax increases – and more over time.
 
As desirable as tax simplification is, I wonder if it is simply a bridge too far given the timetable we’re on, the political environment we’re in and the complexities of the tax code that are certain to continue to yield unpleasant and unintended consequences.
 
I urge us to consider leaving the personal income tax structure intact, but using the budget authority instead to provide a permanent uniform across-the-board reduction in the rates for ALL tax brackets.  Our back-of-the-envelope estimate is that using the current framework, we can reduce tax brackets by a full one percent, averaging a $600 tax savings for joint filers.  (By including repeal of the individual mandate, we can reduce all tax brackets by 1.35 percent, averaging about $800 for joint filers.)

The advantages:
 
It leaves no taxpayer behind.  Whatever your circumstances, you can be sure your overall tax bill will go down.
By reducing ALL marginal rates, it will increase the economic growth potential of the reform.  Productivity depends on how much your NEXT dollar is taxed.
It can be easily communicated without the need for retro-active applicability.  
It will remove a vast proportion of opposition we’re seeing among various business groups that imperils the entire bill.
 
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Resilient Federal Forests Act

2017/11/01

Remarks in support of H.R. 2936 - Resilient Federal Forests Act  
 
Mr. Speaker:
 
Forty-five years ago, Congress enacted laws such as the National Environmental Policy Act, that promised to improve the health of our forests.  They imposed what have become endlessly time-consuming and ultimately cost-prohibitive restrictions on our ability to properly manage our national forests so that we can match the tree density with the ability of the land to support it.  
 
After 45 years of experience with these laws, I think we’re entitled to ask, “How are the forests doing?”  The answer is damning.  Our forests are now catastrophically overgrown, often carrying four times the number of trees the land can support.  In this stressed and weakened condition, our forests are easy prey for drought, disease, pestilence and fire.   
 
There’s an old adage that excess timber comes out of the forest one way or the other.  It’s either carried out – or it burns out.  When we carried it out, we had resilient, healthy forests and a thriving economy as excess timber was sold and harvested before it could choke our forests to death.  In the years since, we’ve seen an 80 percent decline in timber sales from our federal lands and a concomitant increase in acreage destroyed by forest fire.
 
The direct revenues and spin-off commerce generated by these sales provided a stream of revenues that we could then use to improve our national forests and share with the local communities affected. 
 
The Resilient Federal Forests Act begins to move us back toward sound and scientific forest management practices.  It requires forest managers to consider the cost of no action alternatives; it streamlines fire and disease prevention programs and assures that fire-killed timber can be quickly removed to create both revenues and room to restore fire-damaged lands.  It ends the practice of raiding prevention funds to fight fires.  It streamlines onerous environmental review processes without sacrificing environmental protection and provides forest managers with alternatives to resolve frivolous lawsuits. 
 
Provisions that streamline the environmental reviews were already signed into law last year for the Tahoe Basin, and the Forest Service regional manager told me it will take their review from 800 pages to 40 pages, and allow them to begin to get the forest there back to a sustainable level.
 
We made some big mistakes 45 years ago, and our forests have paid the price.  This bill starts the long process of correcting those mistakes and recovering our national forests.  
 
H.R. 2936 (Westerman) The Resilient Federal Forests Act passed the House of Representatives on November 1, 2017
 
 
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Statement on National Park Fee Increase Proposal

2017/10/27


Statement from Congressman McClintock on the National Park Fee Increase Proposal:
 
On Tuesday afternoon, I personally expressed to Secretary Zinke my strong objection to the proposed steep entrance fee hikes for our National Parks.
 
Two of the principal objectives I have set as Chairman of the House Federal Lands Sub-committee are to restore public access to the public lands and to restore the federal government as a good neighbor to those communities directly impacted by the public lands.  The proposed fee increases run counter to both of these policies.
 
At a time when we are trying to encourage more Americans to visit and value our national parks, more than doubling entrance fees is certain to have a significant impact on park visits and the commerce they bring to our gateway communities.
 
I understand the Department’s concerns over revenues, and our sub-committee stands ready to assure that revenues generated in our parks through visitations and attendant commerce stay in our parks.  This is the central principle of my HR 3607, affecting park health clinic funding.  Meanwhile, the House Natural Resources Committee is seeking to prioritize Land and Water Conservation Funds away from excessive land acquisition and toward addressing the Park Service’s growing maintenance backlog.  
 
These steps would assure that funds will be available to address maintenance issues without undermining the very purpose of our national parks: to welcome the American people to the lands set aside for their “use, resort, and recreation,” as promised in the original Yosemite Charter of 1864.
 
 
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Forest Fire Prevention

2017/10/26

Click for Forest Fire Prevention link

October 3, 2017 Speeches
I want to thank Chairman Gosar of the Western Caucus for arranging this special order tonight. The wildfire crisis facing our forests across the West comes down to a simple adage. Excess timber comes out of the forest one way or the other. It is either carried out, or it burns out. But it comes out.


Lake Tahoe Summit

August 22, 2017 Speeches
First, I want to thank Senator Feinstein for restoring the bi-partisan nature of this annual Tahoe Summit. Lincoln once reminded us “that we can succeed only by concert.” We demonstrated that maxim with the enactment of the Tahoe provisions in the Water Infrastructure Improvements Act last December. That wouldn’t have been possible without Republicans and Democrats coming together in Washington.
 

Detwiler Fire

July 26, 2017 Speeches
Mr. Speaker: I want to begin by saluting the more than 5,000 firefighters from 40 cooperating agencies that assembled under the coordination of CALFIRE to battle the Detwiler fire that threatened Yosemite Valley and its gateway communities
 
June 21, 2017 Speeches

H.R. 1873 – Hazard Tree Removal

 

Chairman’s Opening Statement - Subcommittee on Federal Lands

June 15, 2017 Speeches

Congressman McClintock is the chairman of the Subcommittee on Federal Lands.  The subcommittee held a legislative hearing on June 15, 2017.  Congressman McClintock delivered the following opening statement:

Chairman’s Opening Statement
Subcommittee on Federal Lands
House Natural Resources Committee
June 15, 2017

May 17, 2017 Speeches

Congressman McClintock is the chairman of the Subcommittee on Federal Lands.  The subcommittee held a hearing on May 17, 2017.  Congressman McClintock delivered the following opening statement:

Hearing on Wildfire Prevention
Federal Lands Subcommittee
House Natural Resources Committee

WRDA - A Critical Moment for Tahoe and the West

December 7, 2016 Speeches
WRDA Conference Report: Water for California; Fire Protection for Tahoe. The conference report on the Water Resources Development Act is the product of many, many hours of good-faith negotiations between the House and Senate and between Republicans and Democrats.
May 12, 2016 Speeches
And here’s a song we’ve heard before: despite the high fire risk, BLM is not performing adequate fire prevention activities, particularly mechanical treatments, in the area because it is managed as a WSA. In addition, the location of the WSA hampers firefighting tactics, leaving local firefighters with no maneuvering room to protect life and property in the event of catastrophic wildfire.
February 22, 2016 Press Release

The attached letter to the editor from Congressman McClintock has been submitted to the Sacramento Bee:

Matt Weiser grossly misrepresents both Republican federal lands policy and my leadership of the House subcommittee that oversees it.

Our committee seeks to restore responsible stewardship of our national forests and protect the public’s right to enjoy the public’s lands.  

January 27, 2016 Speeches

February 22, 2016

The attached letter to the editor from Congressman McClintock has been submitted to the Sacramento Bee:

Matt Weiser grossly misrepresents both Republican federal lands policy and my leadership of the House subcommittee that oversees it.

Our committee seeks to restore responsible stewardship of our national forests and protect the public’s right to enjoy the public’s lands.  

October 8, 2015 Press Release

Rep. Tom McClintock’s (R-CA) and Rep. Mark Amodei’s (R-NV) H.R. 3382, the “Lake Tahoe Restoration Act of 2015” passed the House Natural Resources Committee today.  The legislation focuses resources on fire prevention and additional measures to protect the lake from the introduction of invasive species. 
 

August 24, 2015 Speeches
Tahoe rests on the northern boundary of California’s Fourth Congressional District. Meanwhile, right now – as we speak – a catastrophic wildfire is raging in the King’s Canyon region on the southern boundary of this very same district. That fire has already consumed 78 square miles of national forests and at latest report is only 17 percent contained.
July 30, 2015 Press Release

Congressman Tom McClintock (R-CA) and Congressman Mark Amodei (R-NV) introduced legislation yesterday to address catastrophic wildfire and invasive species threats to Lake Tahoe and the Tahoe Basin.  The Federal Lands Subcommittee chaired by McClintock had already considered the preliminary draft of H.R. 3382, “Lake Tahoe Restoration Act of 2015,” on July 14th, putting it on a fast track for House passage.

July 9, 2015 Press Release

Congressman McClintock is a co-author of H.R. 2647 (Westerman), the Resilient Federal Forests Act. The legislation was approved by the House on July 9, 2015.  The bill next goes to the Senate. Congressman McClintock delivered the following House floor debate remarks in support of the measure:

Resilient Federal Forests Act
July 9, 2015

    Excess timber comes out of the forest one way or the other.  It is either carried out or it is burned out. 

    When we carried it out, we had healthy forests and a thriving economy.

May 14, 2015 Speeches

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Today, the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Federal Lands held an oversight hearing on the impact of litigation on forest management, the U.S. Forest Service’s response to the growing challenge of litigation and related impacts upon forest health. 

Supervisor Randy Hanvelt of Tuolumne County provided testimony at the hearing.  Supervisor Hanvelt’s district includes large sections of the Stanislaus National Forest, an area severely impacted by the 2013 Rim Fire.

April 23, 2015 Speeches
Over the past thirty years, we have seen an 80 percent reduction in timber harvested from our national forests, and in the same period a concomitant increase in acreage destroyed by fire. This phenomenon far predates the Western drought and was best summed up by a forester long ago who observed, “All that excess timber comes out of the forests one way or the other. It is either CARRIED OUT or it is BURNED OUT. But it comes OUT.”
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Senate Amendments to the Budget

2017/10/26

Senate Amendments to the Budget
 
Mr. Speaker:
 
Unsustainable government spending drives both taxes and debt.   
 
The budget resolution sets the spending architecture for the fiscal year.  The House version provided for $200 billion of enforceable mandatory spending reductions over ten years and balanced within the decade.  
 
The Senate amendments gut these provisions, squandering the one opportunity Congress has each year to bring mandatory spending under control -- taking us another year closer to a sovereign debt crisis.  This is tragic and I condemn it in the strongest terms.
 
The Senate has retained just one key provision from the House budget.  It makes tax reform possible this year.  Tax reform is essential to economic growth, and economic growth is essential to confront our debt.
 

Many are alarmed that it provides for $1.5 trillion of additional debt – but this is solely due to the Senate’s rules that require tax cuts to be scored ONLY as revenue losses without taking into account economic expansion.
                 
During the Obama years, our economy grew at an average of 1 1/2 percent annually – about half the average rate since World War II.  Reagan averaged 3 1/2 percent.  Reagan did this by reducing the tax burdens that were crushing our economy.  He slashed the top income tax rate from 70 percent to 28 percent --- and income tax receipts nearly doubled because of the economic expansion he unleashed.
 
Taxes driven by spending are the greatest threat to our economy today and debt driven by spending is the greatest threat to our future.  Controlling spending is currently impossible in the Senate.  So, it’s obvious that we can’t balance the budget and reduce our debt without significantly increasing economic growth; we can’t increase economic growth without tax relief; and we can’t get tax relief without the provisions in the Senate budget.
          
Arthur Laffer, architect of the Reagan tax policy, forecasts that the corporate tax reform alone will increase GDP growth at a rate that should generate a temporary bump of 5 percent, settling down to an average of 2.6 percent over the decade.  This alone will add $5 trillion to the American economy and directly increase revenues to all levels of government between 1.8 and two trillion dollars.   
 
We tried a static approach to tax policy during the Obama years.  The economy stagnated and the debt doubled.  
 
I remember what it was like in the Reagan era.  Wages were rising, opportunities for better jobs were everywhere, there was a sense of optimism that comes with prosperity and abundance.  When we abandoned these policies, we lost that prosperity to a decade of despair.   I want my kids to know what that sense of relief and optimism was like – what it feels like when morning dawns again in the America economy.   This resolution starts that transformation.
 
 
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California Water Crisis

2017/10/23

Click for California Water Crisis link

Folsom Dam Ceremony

October 17, 2017 Speeches
There have been so many milestones passed with this project, it is a wonderful feeling to realize that we’ve finally arrived at the destination. The Folsom Dam auxiliary gates will help the Sacramento region achieve 200-year flood protection, taking the chance of flooding to one half of one percent per year. Those are better odds than we’ve ever had against the kind of flooding that once plagued our Capitol region. This year, we’ve seen the damage flooding can do on a massive scale, and this project will help defend against such a fate here.


Remarks in Support of The Grow Act (H.R. 23)

July 12, 2017 Speeches
In California, five years of historic drought caused billions of dollars of damage to our economy, destroyed tens of thousands of jobs and brought many communities within just months of literally running out of water – all because we couldn’t store water from the wet years to assure plenty in the drought years.
 
June 22, 2017 Speeches
Legislation authored by Congressman McClintock, H.R. 1654, passed the House on June 22, 2017.  The legislation next goes to the Senate.
 

H.R.1654 - Water Supply Permitting Coordination Act

April 26, 2017 Speeches
Droughts are nature’s fault. Water shortages are OUR fault. Water shortages are a choice we made a generation ago when we stopped building new reservoirs to meet the needs of a growing population. We will not solve our water shortages until we build new reservoirs. And we cannot build new reservoirs until we overhaul the radical environmental laws that have made their construction endlessly time consuming and ultimately cost prohibitive.


WRDA - A Critical Moment for Tahoe and the West

December 7, 2016 Speeches
WRDA Conference Report: Water for California; Fire Protection for Tahoe. The conference report on the Water Resources Development Act is the product of many, many hours of good-faith negotiations between the House and Senate and between Republicans and Democrats.
December 1, 2016 Speeches
President-elect Trump has many difficult fiscal tasks ahead – one of which is to promote long-overdue infrastructure construction at a time when the national debt exceeds our entire economy and interest costs alone are eating us alive. Some have said that a rebounding economy resulting from tax reform will pay for it. That may be, but it’s not guaranteed; it cannot be accurately forecast; and we’ll need any new revenues to beef up our defenses and reduce our deficit – two other critical objectives of the new administration.
September 28, 2016 Vote Notes on Legislation

H.R. 5303 - Water Resources Development Act:  YES.  On the plus side, out of a total of $10.5 billion for projects across the nation, this bill authorizes $1.6 billion for flood control projects in the Sacramento Delta.  (Of course, this would have been unnecessary if the Auburn Dam had been completed, but at the moment that’s, um, water under the bridge).  It also includes a provision I have long sought to allow the use of fish hatcheries to meet ESA requirements, which has the potential to save billions of dollars and billions of gallons of water.

August 27, 2015 Speeches
It’s ironic that we are celebrating progress on a facility to rapidly release water out of Folsom Lake while we are in the fourth year of an historic drought and the lake is nearly empty. This spillway project is a reminder that the previous generation built these great dams not only to protect us against water shortages in dry years, but also to protect us against floods in wet ones. This combination of water storage and flood protection is what makes it possible to sustain a thriving and prosperous human population throughout this region.
July 16, 2015 Speeches

Congressman McClintock is a co-author of H.R. 2898 (Valadao) the Western Water and American Food Security Act.  The legislation was approved by the House on July 16th, 2015.  The bill next goes to the Senate.  Congressman McClintock delivered the following remarks in support of H.R. 2898 during House floor debate, and he also spoke in opposition to an amendment offered by Rep. Grijalva.

H.R. 2898 – California Water Bill
July 16, 2015

Mr. Speaker:

July 16, 2015 Speeches

Congressman McClintock is a co-author of H.R. 2898 (Valadao) the Western Water and American Food Security Act.  The legislation was approved by the House on July 16th, 2015.  The bill next goes to the Senate.  During House floor debate the Congressman spoke in opposition to an amendment offered to the bill by Rep. Grijalva. The amendment was not adopted. The Congressman's House floor debate remarks in support of H.R.

July 8, 2015 Press Release

Congressman McClintock is a co-author of H.R. 2898 (Valadao), the Western Water and American Food Security Act of 2015.  The legislation was approved by the House Natural Resources Committee on July 9th, 2015.  The bill next goes to the House floor.  Congressman McClintock delivered the following remarks in the House Natural Resources Committee in support of the measure:

Opening Statement
HR 2898 – California Water Bill
July 8, 2015


Mr. Chairman:

May 1, 2015 Press Release

Washington, D.C. – The House of Representatives today adopted an amendment by Congressman Tom McClintock to forbid federal agencies from buying up scarce water during California’s catastrophic drought in order to release it into rivers to meet environmental requirements.  The amendment was subsequently adopted today as part of the Fiscal Year 2016 Energy and Water Appropriations Act. The amendment was adopted on a vote of 226 – 9, and final passage of the Appropriations Act on a vote of 230 –7.

April 22, 2015 Speeches
California is now in its fourth year of the worst drought on record. Hydrologists estimate it is the worst drought in 1,200 years.
March 26, 2015 Press Release
During times of extreme and exceptional drought conditions the bill will suspend water releases by Federal and State agencies to adjust river water temperatures.
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Contact Information

434 Cannon HOB
Washington, DC 20515
Phone 202-225-2511
Fax 202-225-5444
mcclintock.house.gov

Congressman Tom McClintock was elected in November 2008 to represent the 4th Congressional District in the United States Congress.

During 22 years in the California State Legislature, and as a candidate for governor in California’s historic recall election, Tom McClintock has become one of the most recognizable political leaders in California.

First elected to the California Assembly at the age of 26, McClintock quickly distinguished himself as an expert in parliamentary procedure and fiscal policy. He served in the Assembly from 1982 to 1992 and again from 1996 to 2000. During these years, he authored California’s current lethal injection death penalty law, spearheaded the campaign to rebate $1.1 billion in tax over-collections to the people of California, and became the driving force in the legislature to abolish the car tax. He has proposed hundreds of specific reforms to streamline state government and reduce state spending.

In 2000, McClintock was elected to the California State Senate, where he developed innovative budget solutions such as the Bureaucracy Reduction and Closure Commission and performance-based budgeting, and advocated for restoring California’s public works.

From 1992-1994, McClintock served as Director of the Center for the California Taxpayer, a project of the National Tax Limitation Foundation. In 1995, he was named Director of Economic and Regulatory Affairs for the Claremont Institute’s Golden State Center for Policy Studies, a position he held until his return to the Assembly in 1996. In that capacity, he wrote and lectured extensively on state fiscal policy, privatization, bureaucratic reform and governmental streamlining.

McClintock’s commentaries on California public policy have appeared in every major newspaper in California and he is a frequent guest on radio and television broadcasts across the nation. Numerous taxpayer associations have honored him for his leadership on state budget issues.

McClintock has twice received the Republican nomination for the office of State Controller, narrowly missing election in 2002 by the closest margin in California history – 23/100ths of one percent of the votes cast.

McClintock is the Chairman of the Water and Power Subcommittee of the House Natural Resources Committee, and is a member of the Budget Committee and the Natural Resources Committee.   He is also a member of the Subcommittee on National Parks, Forests, and Public Lands.

Tom McClintock and his wife, Lori, have two children, Justin and Shannah.


Serving With

Doug LaMalfa

CALIFORNIA's 1st DISTRICT

Paul Cook

CALIFORNIA's 8th DISTRICT

Jeff Denham

CALIFORNIA's 10th DISTRICT

David Valadao

CALIFORNIA's 21st DISTRICT

Devin Nunes

CALIFORNIA's 22nd DISTRICT

Kevin McCarthy

CALIFORNIA's 23rd DISTRICT

Steve Knight

CALIFORNIA's 25th DISTRICT

Ed Royce

CALIFORNIA's 39th DISTRICT

Ken Calvert

CALIFORNIA's 42nd DISTRICT

Mimi Walters

CALIFORNIA's 45th DISTRICT

Dana Rohrabacher

CALIFORNIA's 48th DISTRICT

Darrell Issa

CALIFORNIA's 49th DISTRICT

Duncan Hunter

CALIFORNIA's 50th DISTRICT

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