Scott Tipton

Scott Tipton

COLORADO's 3rd DISTRICT

Tipton, energy leader talk future of business on Western Slope

2019/03/20

KKCO

GRAND JUNCTION, Colo. (KKCO/KJCT)-- Congressman Scott Tipton was in Grand Junction Tuesday talking energy on the Western Slope.

Community, business and energy leaders talked about what works, what could work and what isn't working in the energy landscape—from coal to hydropower and more. Tipton said he plans to take these discussions back to Washington.

"What we're seeing and hearing from the local impacts of federal policy, and how it's positive or how it's impacting and inhibiting the ability to be able to develop those resources—it's good information we can take back to Washington,” said Tipton, 3rd Congressional Distr. (Co).

For Montrose County Commissioner, Roger Rash, he hopes to bring more environmentally friendly energy jobs back to the Nucla station.

“What we're proposing is a bio fuels plant that is a fluidized based system in there so you don't get all the pollutants,” said Rash.

 
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COLUMN: Women in Small Business, The Unsung Heroes

2019/03/19

March is Women’s History Month, a time when we honor women’s important contributions to our nation’s story. In concurrence with this celebration, I recently co-hosted a roundtable discussion as co-Chair of the Small Business Caucus to highlight the valuable impact that women-owned small businesses have in communities across the country, as well as explore some of the challenges that women face when it comes to growing or strengthening their businesses.

Serving as co-Chair of the Small Business Caucus and as a member of the House Committee on Financial Services gives me the opportunity to look at the lending practices of banks, the gatekeepers of capital for millions of small businesses. The primary source of capital for small business has traditionally been through the banking system, which hasn’t always made accessing capital easy, especially for women business owners.

The roundtable discussion focused on the barriers that women-owned small businesses face, especially when it comes to access to capital. I was reminded that women-owned businesses only account for 16% of conventional small business loans, and only 4% of all commercial loan dollars. This data from Senate Small Business Committee is striking, considering women-owned small businesses contribute  trillions of dollars to our economy every year. The roundtable discussion was a good jumping-off point to become more actively engaged with local financial institutions, as well as small business owners – from non-profits to franchisees – to raise awareness of this issue and find actionable solutions to help right the discrepancy in lending and opportunity.

From a congressional standpoint, it’s my colleagues’ and my responsibility to make sure our regulators are also paying close attention to this challenge. I raised this issue during a recent hearing with the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) Director Kathy Kraninger. She assured me the CFPB is well-equipped to help manage the lending disparity in small business loans and highlighted that the CFPB’s resources can lead to better lending practices. I agree that the CFPB is equipped to address this issue, but it must be careful to use its supervisory and enforcement authority in a way that doesn’t add to the long list of federal compliance burdens that already create barriers for lenders and small business owners. 

It is my hope that we can find a bipartisan path forward to level the playing field for women-led ventures. Our nation’s history is full of success stories, many of them rooted in small business. The continued success of women-led businesses should not be stalled due to biases in accessing capital. I will continue to work to ensure that all entrepreneurs can grow, create jobs, and serve their communities.

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100-year-old man recognized by Rep. Tipton

2019/03/19

Montrose Daily Press

Nick Gray, lifetime resident of Montrose County, was presented Monday with a gold-framed Congressional Record from the House of Representatives by U.S. Rep. Scott Tipton who traveled from Denver to Gray's home in Montrose. The award, thanking Gray for his lifetime of service throughout the state, has become a part of the state archives.

Gray celebrated his 100th birthday on Feb. 11 of this year. He is the grandson of the famed Judge John Gray who homesteaded in the Uncompahgre Valley in 1884, was a circuit district judge and was known as the “golden tongued orator.”

“I used to hide in my grandfather's living room to listen to him go over his many cases and experiences. I talked with him the day he died. He really wanted to be 100 years old, but he went just a few days short of that,” said Gray.

Gray's first years were spent on the California Mesa family ranch of Joe and Addie Gray, growing up with ten siblings. He was on the back of a horse from the age of three, herding cattle, roping, working from before daylight until well after dark.

In 1940, when World War II was lurking in the future, Gray volunteered for the Army. He was stationed at Pearl Harbor the day of the fateful bombing by the Japanese. From there he was sent to Guadalcanal.

“People today will never realize what shape our country was in at that time,” said Gray, his voice shaking with emotion. “We left graveyards of many soldiers on Guadalcanal.”

With experiences and skills learned from his time in the Army, Gray returned to the states to form the Nick Gray Construction Company, as well as what has become a huge cattle operation. He is responsible for clearing and readying miles of land for power lines, roads and ski areas, not only in Colorado, but also New Mexico and Wyoming.

Tipton intently listened to Gray tell several life stories before making his presentation. After reading the entire award to Gray, the congressman shook Gray's hand and thanked him not only for his military service but also his help in the development of the state of Colorado.

“Thank you and thank you for your time,” Gray said. “I love you.”

The award will stand out on Gray's dining room “wall of fame.” Judge Gray's photo is on top, followed by other family photos and many plaques such as Outstanding Rancher, Uncompahgre Valley Cattleman's Association award and Gray Family Appreciation award.

Marilyn Cox, a native of Montrose County, grew up on a farm and was always surrounded by countless family members who instilled the love of family and history. She retired from the Montrose County School District and, for 21 years, served as curator of the Montrose County Historical Museum.

 

 
 
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Colorado Congressional Delegation Introduce ‘Native American’ Education Act

2019/03/15

Pagosa Daily Post

Colorado’s US Senators Cory Gardner (R) and Michael Bennet (D), along with US Representatives Diana DeGette (CO-1) and Scott Tipton (CO-03), yesterday introduced the Native American Indian Education Act, legislation that would address the current federal-state agreements mandating states finance Native American’s tuition at certain universities.

States like Colorado that encounter severe budget constraints are struggling to fulfill the requirement to provide tuition-free higher education opportunities for Native American Indian students from out of state. Currently, the state housing the educational institution is responsible for the students’ tuition. This legislation would provide relief to state education budgets and protect tuition-free higher education for Native Americans by updating the tuition waiver program to reflect the current reality of educational costs and make the federal-state arrangement as equitable as possible. Fort Lewis College in Durango, Colorado, covered just a few dozen students when it’s federal-state agreement was first struck in 1910. Today in Colorado alone, more than 31,539 Native American Tuition Waivers have been provided to approximately 15,770 Native American students from 351 Tribal governments.

This legislation also directs the Department of Education to cover the tuition for out-of-state students so that the cost of educating Native American and Alaska natives from across the country does not fall solely on individual states. The purpose of the legislation is to ensure the federal government continues to live up to its commitment and provide educational opportunities to Native American Indian students.

“Colorado’s Fort Lewis College and higher education institutions across the country provide world-class educations to both Native and non-Native students,” said Senator Gardner. “States facing difficult fiscal environments, however, are struggling to foot the tuition bill for out-of-state Native American Indian students to whom the federal government promised tuition-free higher education nearly a century ago. The Native American Indian Education Act ensures that the federal government continues to live up to its commitment and extends much-needed budgetary relief to states like Colorado. I’m proud to work with Senator Bennet and Representatives Tipton and DeGette on this commonsense, bipartisan solution that makes Native American education a national priority.”

“Education is a fundamental promise to all Americans,” said Senator Bennet. “Our bill would make it possible for schools like Fort Lewis College in Durango to continue providing Native American students with the opportunity of receiving a higher education – an opportunity they may otherwise not have without this important program.”

“This bipartisan, commonsense legislation will allow us to keep the promise we made to provide Native American and Alaska Native students with a free, high quality education,” said Representative DeGette. “It also ensures that the federal government is the one covering the cost of that education, not the states, so that each state can provide even more tuition assistance to in-state students.”

“It is vital that the federal government fully live up to our nation’s treaty obligations with Native American Indians. An unfunded federal mandate in conjunction with in-state budgetary strains has forced unnecessary burdens onto universities like Fort Lewis College, threatening to eliminate Native American Tuition Waiver Programs,” said Representative Tipton. “We must continue to uphold centuries-old treaty obligations and allocate the appropriate funds for the many talented and bright Native American Indians students that seek a quality education.”

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Rep. Tipton on pushing back on Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez's socialist policies

2019/03/13

Fox Business Interview, "Mornings with Maria," on March 13, 2019.

Rep. Scott Tipton, R-Co., on the investigation into the crash of an Ethiopian Airlines Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft, the Wells Fargo CEO Tim Sloan's testimony on Capitol Hill, the growing popularity of socialism and the debate over taxes.

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Tipton, DeGette, Gardner and Bennet Introduce Native American Indian Education Act

2019/03/13

 

Washington, D.C. –  On Tuesday, March 12, 2019,  Representatives Scott Tipton (CO-03) and Diana DeGette (CO-1), along with U.S. Colorado Senators Cory Gardner (R) and Michael Bennet (D), introduced the Native American Indian Education Act, legislation that would address the current federal-state agreements mandating states finance Native American’s tuition at certain universities.

States like Colorado that encounter severe budget constraints are struggling to fulfill the requirement to provide tuition-free higher education opportunities for Native American Indian students from out of state. Currently, the state housing the educational institution is responsible for the students’ tuition. This legislation would provide relief to state education budgets and protect tuition-free higher education for Native Americans by updating the tuition waiver program to reflect the current reality of educational costs and make the federal-state arrangement as equitable as possible. Fort Lewis College in Durango, Colorado, covered just a few dozen students when it’s federal-state agreement was first struck in 1910. Today in Colorado alone, more than 31,539 Native American Tuition Waivers have been provided to approximately 15,770 Native American students from 351 Tribal governments. 

This legislation also directs the Department of Education to cover the tuition for out-of-state students so that the cost of educating Native American and Alaska natives from across the country does not fall solely on individual states. The purpose of the legislation is to ensure the federal government continues to live up to its commitment and provide educational opportunities to Native American Indian students.

“It is vital that the federal government fully live up to our nation’s treaty obligations with Native American Indians. An unfunded federal mandate in conjunction with in-state budgetary strains has forced unnecessary burdens onto universities like Fort Lewis College, threatening to eliminate Native American Tuition Waiver Programs,” said Representative Tipton. “We must continue to uphold centuries-old treaty obligations and allocate the appropriate funds for the many talented and bright Native American Indians students that seek a quality education.”

“Colorado’s Fort Lewis College and higher education institutions across the country provide world-class educations to both Native and non-Native students,” said Senator Gardner. “States facing difficult fiscal environments, however, are struggling to foot the tuition bill for out-of-state Native American Indian students to whom the federal government promised tuition-free higher education nearly a century ago. The Native American Indian Education Act ensures that the federal government continues to live up to its commitment and extends much-needed budgetary relief to states like Colorado. I’m proud to work with Senator Bennet and Representatives Tipton and DeGette on this commonsense, bipartisan solution that makes Native American education a national priority.”

"Education is a fundamental promise to all Americans,” said Senator Bennet. “Our bill would make it possible for schools like Fort Lewis College in Durango to continue providing Native American students with the opportunity of receiving a higher education—an opportunity they may otherwise not have without this important program.”

“This bipartisan, commonsense legislation will allow us to keep the promise we made to provide Native American and Alaska Native students with a free, high quality education,” said Representative DeGette. “It also ensures that the federal government is the one covering the cost of that education, not the states, so that each state can provide even more tuition assistance to in-state students.”

The house legislation can be found here

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Tipton, Crow, Gardner, Peters Introduce Legislation to Overhaul Veterans Affairs Hiring Process

2019/03/12

Washington, D.C. – Representatives Scott Tipton (CO-3) and Jason Crow (CO-6), along with Senators Cory Gardner (R-CO) and Gary Peters (D-MI), introduced the Veterans Improved Access and Care Act, legislation designed to reform the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) hiring process to make it easier to fill staffing shortages at the agency.

Many VA hospitals continue to experience long wait times and staffing shortages as a result of a lengthy hiring process, and a primary driver of the protracted hiring process is the onboarding process for licensed medical providers. According to a McKinsey and Company Assessment from September 2015, the VA hiring timeline spans 4-8 months while a typical private sector organization hires staff between 0.5 and 2 months. Furthermore, “candidates for many roles are often unwilling to wait roughly six months to be on boarded, especially when positions with other hospitals are readily available.”

This bipartisan legislation aims to address this problem by authorizing the VA to establish a pilot program to expedite the hiring of licensed medical professionals in locations where there are shortages of available specialists. The bill also requires the VA Secretary to submit a report detailing a strategy on how to reduce the length of the VA’s hiring process by half for licensed medical professionals.

“Veterans should receive high quality medical care without unnecessary wait times,” said Congressman Tipton. “It’s unacceptable that many veterans’ access to doctors and medical specialists is delayed because of VA staff shortages in part because of a bureaucratic hiring process. I am pleased to join my colleagues in introducing legislation to shorten wait times and will continue to look for ways to ensure veterans receive the best care and services possible.”

“In order to reduce wait times and provide timely care to our veterans, we must address the root of the problem at many VA facilities in Colorado and across the country: staffing shortages,” said Gardner. “When it comes to the VA hiring medical professionals we cannot let government bureaucracy and red tape stand in the way. The VA Secretary needs to take meaningful action to reform the hiring process and make sure facilities are able to hire the medical professionals needed to serve our veterans.”

“It’s critical that the VA medical facilities our veterans rely on are fully staffed by qualified doctors, nurses and health care professionals,” said Senator Peters. “This bipartisan legislation would help address the staffing shortage by streamlining the hiring process across the VA system, so that veterans in Michigan and every corner of the country have access to timely, quality medical care.”

“For some veterans, long wait times and bureaucracy at the VA can be more than just frustrating, it can be devastating. As a veteran, and now a member of Congress, I promise to never turn my back on those that served and this bill is an important first step to finding new solutions to help remedy some of the troubles plaguing the VA,” said Rep. Crow. “Right now, there are over 40,000 vacancies at the VA across its departments. Expediting the hiring process ensures we quickly and efficiently hire medical personnel who provide the medical care our veterans need and deserve.”   

 

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COLUMN: One Veteran Suicide is Too Many

2019/03/11

Nearly 20 veterans commit suicide every day according to the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). That’s a staggering 7,300 veterans a year, or nearly triple the American deaths attributed to the entire War in Afghanistan. One suicide is too many, and as a nation, we must do everything possible to support the men and women who served our country in their greatest times of need, to put an end to this tragic epidemic plaguing our veteran community.

This week, President Trump issued an order to start a task force focused on giving local communities resources for researching the causes of veteran suicide and offering preventive care. The president’s initiative, the President’s Roadmap to Empower Veterans and End a National Tragedy of Suicide (PREVENTS), was signed on March 5, 2019 and is a big step in the right direction to improve mental healthcare for veterans. One of the most beneficial aspects of PREVENTS is that it facilitates greater federal, state and local collaboration on improving mental healthcare for veterans.

While in Congress, I have held many events and round table discussions with military and veteran groups. During each of these conversations, I find one common trait: local communities are the best option to serve the healthcare needs of veterans whenever possible. Many veteran residents in Colorado’s Third Congressional District face geographic or economic barriers when seeking treatment. We should seek to reduce or eliminate these barriers by ensuring our communities can provide the best treatment options for veterans coping with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) or other mental health issues.

Congress also continues to work to address veteran suicide. Last year, I was proud so cosponsor H.R. 5986, the Bill Mulder and Ryan Larkin Posttraumatic Growth Act. This bill would direct the VA to develop a pilot program to measure how nonprofit PTSD growth studies are conducted and how the VA could potentially integrate the methods into their system. Utilizing the latest research and treatment methods will be vital to ending veteran suicide, and I look forward to supporting bills like H.R. 5986 this Congress.

My staff and I will continue to work with the VA, nonprofit organizations and other local resources to help develop effective veteran resources and treatment options. My office is always available to connect veterans to resources that are available to them, so if you are a veteran or know a veteran in need, do not hesitate to reach out to my Pueblo office 719-542-1073 or visit my website: https://tipton.house.gov

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State, federal officials: What’s up with Denver TV in Southwest Colorado?

2019/03/08

Cortez Journal

WASHINGTON – Colorado Rep. Scott Tipton and state Attorney General Phil Weiser put pressure on the Federal Communications Commission this week to allow Denver-based TV signals to reach more homes in La Plata and Montezuma counties.

La Plata and Montezuma counties receive TV programming from nearby Albuquerque. Residents of such “orphan counties” have pushed to receive Denver-based programming for years.

The FCC approved a petition in March 2017 allow La Plata County to begin receiving Denver stations, but the process has stalled since Albuquerque broadcast stations, unwilling to lose the two Colorado counties, filed a letter of review with the FCC.

On Tuesday, Tipton sent a letter to FCC Chairman Ajit Pai to “urge the FCC to expedite the decision on the Albuquerque broadcast stations’ Application for Review.”

Speaking with The Durango Herald on Thursday, Tipton said he has not received a response from the FCC or Pai.

Tipton said it has been “an ongoing issue in terms of being able to get the weather, the news, our sports channels” for La Plata and Montezuma counties. He detailed the lack of relevant information the two counties receive from their New Mexico programing.

“We don’t know what’s going on in our state legislature. When we had the 416 Fire, Albuquerque wasn’t really covering that and if you had a relative that was maybe in Denver, they weren’t getting the news on it.”

Tipton acknowledged the “resistance out of the FCC to be able to actually address it” and said the purpose of his letter was “to be able to get them to move forward on making a decision.”

Tipton underscored the flexibility the current plan would provide residents of both counties. “It’s not that you would never receive New Mexico TV again, but you would have the option of watching it or Denver TV,” he said.

Colorado Attorney General Phil Weiser said “it’s a quirk of the system that Southwestern Colorado has been put in this box.”

Weiser discussed the “orphan counties” issue with Chairman Pai during his first official trip to Washington, D.C. since taking office in January. Weiser pressed Pai to understand the FCC’s delay in resolving the Albuquerque stations’ petition for review.

“I left the meeting feeling very encouraged,” he said Wednesday in an interview with The Durango Herald. “I know the substance of this issue and we’re on the right side of it. I worked hard to bring a sense of urgency to it.”

La Plata County commissioners have also continued to push for Denver-based programing, sending a letter on Feb. 26 calling for the FCC to take immediate action to rule in favor of the March 2017 decision.

The FCC could not be reached for comment.

Tipton said he will continue to advocate for “good common sense” because if you live in Colorado, you ought to be able to access Colorado TV.” 

Liz Weber is a student at American University in Washington, D.C., and an intern for The Durango Herald.

 

 
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Bill would expand Yucca House National Monument

2019/03/06

Cortez Journal

Yucca House National Monument south of Cortez would grow six times larger under legislation introduced this week in Congress.

U.S. Rep. Scott Tipton and Sen. Cory Gardner, both Colorado Republicans, introduced companion bills HR 1492 and S 641, which allow for a 160-acre land donation to the archaeological-rich monument.

“The Yucca House National Monument is one of the most significant archaeological sites in the country and stands as a reminder of how the ancient Pueblo people used to live hundreds of years ago,” said Tipton.

Gardner added that “protecting Colorado’s public lands for our future generations is one of my top priorities, and I’m excited to introduce this legislation that will provide additional safeguards for Yucca House National Monument, one of the most well-preserved ancient dwellings in the country.”

Bernard and Nancy Karwick have agreed to donate a 160-acre parcel along the south eastern border of the 33-acre monument to help preserve ancient cultural sites. Because of the significant expansion, the monument’s boundary adjustment must be facilitated through an act of Congress.

The bill would expand the monument to 193 acres, and it coincides with the monument’s 100-year anniversary.

“We don’t foresee any issues holding it up,” said Mathew Atwood, press secretary for Tipton. “The monument and the landowner are in agreement on the donation. Statutes require congressional approval.”

Yucca House was first established in 1919 by President Woodrow Wilson after an initial land donation by Henry Van Kleeck. It was expanded to 33 acres in 1996.

If passed, the expanded monument would protect additional Ancestral Puebloan sites and allow resolution of a long-standing problem of access. Yucca House is managed by Mesa Verde National Park.

Currently, public access is allowed via a National Park Service easement on a ranch at the end of County Road 20.5.

Back in 2014, rancher Larry Pickens, an agent for Box Bar Ranch, had asked Montezuma County commissioners to abandon Road 20.5, which accesses Yucca House. He said tourist traffic and parking interfere with his farming operation.

But the request was denied because monument managers pointed out they hold a 1936 permanent public road easement through the rancher’s land, and it can’t be abandoned unless another access point was created.

Monument and county officials support a plan to relocate the public entrance off the Box Bar Ranch to a point farther down Road 20.5 where it passes along the proposed expanded portion. New infrastructure would be minimal, and may include a parking lot, restroom and formalized trail system with interpretative wayside exhibits.

Bill sponsors received needed support for the private land transfer from Montezuma County commissioners.

Commissioners balked at supporting it after passage of a county No Net Loss ordinance in 2017 that was in response to federal agencies obtaining private land and taking it off the tax rolls.

The ordinance states that if a federal land agency acquires private land to be put in the public domain, an equal amount of acreage of federal land should be offered back to the private sector.

But when Mesa Verde National Park officials noted to the commissioners that they expressed support for the land donation before the ordinance was passed, the commissioners stood by their original support for the land donation.

Yucca House is relatively unknown. Although it is open to the public for no fee, no signs direct tourists to the monument, and most visitors find out about it only while visiting Mesa Verde, which offers tours of the 800-year-old pueblo.

The unexcavated pueblo village has the ruins of 600 rooms, 100 kivas, several towers, multiple plazas, unexplained structures and one great kiva.

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Rep Tipton: "We've got to keep this financial market working, keep the economy moving." (FBN part 1)

2019-03-13 14:13:54


Rep. Tipton, "When we look at the track record of socialism, it's not good." (FBN Part 2)

2019-03-13 14:14:07


Tipton Requests Space Command Be Moved Back to Colorado and Introduces Bill to Help Vets

2019-03-13 13:49:04


Rep. Tipton: Small Businesses Achieve Outcomes From the Top Down, is Wells Fargo Doing the Same?

2019-03-12 17:29:54


Tipton: Are Regulatory Burdens Holding Back Women in Small Business From Having Access to Capital?

2019-03-08 14:58:40


Rep. Tipton: Access to Capital is Vital for Small Businesses

2019-03-07 22:11:02


Tipton Honors Fallen Colorado Law Enforcement Officers on House Floor

2018-11-29 18:15:44


Tipton Speaks in Support of his Bill to Prevent the Illicit Financing of Weapons Proliferation

2018-09-27 14:20:16


Tipton Speaks in Support of Reauthorizing the Cheney Disposal Cell in Mesa County

2018-09-25 21:14:40


Tipton Speaks on His Legislation to Prevent the Illicit Financing of Dangerous Weapons

2018-07-24 18:32:00


Tipton Speaks on His Legislation to Support Recreation on Ski Areas

2018-07-18 20:23:41


Tipton Speaks at Hearing on Financing of Weapons Proliferation

2018-07-12 20:04:11


Tipton: Education and Energy Act a Win-Win for the American People

2018-06-27 20:16:50


Tipton Speaks on House Efforts to Combat Opioid Epidemic

2018-06-15 14:45:08


Congressman Scott Tipton Speaks on the Success of Tax Reform

2018-06-13 20:46:40


Tipton Speaks in Support of Regulatory Relief Package, which includes his MOBILE Act

2018-05-22 19:34:18


Tipton: High Speed Internet is a Necessity

2018-05-17 21:47:22


Tipton Promotes National Prescription Drug Take Back Day

2018-04-27 15:05:19


Tipton Speaks in Support of his West Fork Fire Station Conveyance Act

2018-04-16 21:48:15


Tipton Calls for Regular Order in the Regulatory Relief Process

2018-04-13 16:27:52


Contact Information

218 Cannon HOB
Washington, DC 20515
Phone 202-225-4761
Fax 202-226-9669
tipton.house.gov

Committee Assignments

Financial Services

Natural Resources

Congressman Scott Tipton was raised in Cortez, Colorado. He graduated from Ft. Lewis College in Durango, where he studied Political Science and became the first person in his family to earn a college degree. After college, he returned home to Cortez and co-founded Mesa Verde Indian Pottery with his brother Joe. It was through his business that Scott met his wife, Jean, who is a former school teacher. The Tipton’s have two daughters, Liesl and Elizabeth, and two  sons-in-law, Chris and Jace.

After a lifetime running his small business, Scott was elected as a Republican to the Colorado House of Representatives for the 58th District in November of 2008. During his time at the state House, he worked to ensure quality water for the people of Colorado and to improve the air quality of Southwest Colorado. He also sponsored legislation to protect children from the worst criminal offenders by mandating harsher penalties for child sex-offenders and allowing law enforcement to collect DNA evidence from suspects through Jessica’s Law and Katie’s Law.

Scott was first elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 2010 and again in 2012 for a second term.

In the 112th Congress, Scott pushed hard to advance a federal version of Katie’s Law to encourage additional states to implement minimum DNA collection standards and enhanced collection processes for felons in order to strengthen law enforcement’s ability to prevent violent crimes, and protect women and children.  That effort became a reality when the President signed Katie’s Law on January 3, 2013.

Using his positions on the House Natural Resources, Agriculture and Small Business Committees, Scott has is fighting for the issues that most directly impact Coloradans, many of which involve our state’s extensive open spaces and natural resources.  In his first term, Scott introduced legislation to encourage healthy forest management and prevent wildfire, as well as passed a bill in the House with bipartisan support to advance the development of clean, renewable hydropower.  He is also leading the charge in Congress to stop a federal grab of privately-held water rights, standing up for farmers and ranchers, the ski industry, and all who rely on their water rights to survive.

Scott is champion of advancing an all-of-the-above energy solution that balances common sense conservation with responsible development. He passed the Planning for American Energy Act through the House (as a title under the American Domestic Energy and Jobs Act) to put requirements into place to develop wind, solar, hydropower, geothermal, oil, natural gas, coal, oil shale and minerals, based on the needs of the American people.

Scott has used his experience as a small businessman to inform his work as a Subcommittee Chairman on the Small Business Committee. Here he has worked to protect farmers and ranchers from regulatory overreach, as well as push for expanded trade opportunities for Colorado products. Scott is a co-founder of the Congressional Small Business Caucus, a bipartisan caucus committed to open dialogue on the issues that most impact small businesses.  Members of the Congressional Small Business Caucus are dedicated to advancing efforts to foster the economic certainty needed for small businesses and entrepreneurs to succeed and create jobs.

In the 113th Congress, Scott continues to represent the many interests of one of the most diverse and geographically vast districts in the nation. He will fight to bring Colorado common sense to Washington—focusing on reforming regulation, protecting Colorado’s natural environment, encouraging responsible all-of-the-above energy development, reducing government spending, and removing hurdles so that small businesses can do what they do best—create jobs.


Serving With

KenBuck

COLORADO's 4th DISTRICT

DougLamborn

COLORADO's 5th DISTRICT

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