Mark Meadows

Mark Meadows

NORTH CAROLINA's 11th DISTRICT

Meadows’ statement on the passage of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act

2017/11/16

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Rep. Mark Meadows (R-NC) released the following statement on the passage of H.R. 1, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act:

“Today, the House kept its promise to pass a historic tax reform proposal—and it’s a delivery that is long overdue.

“Moms, dads, small-business owners and working families across the country sent us to Congress to create a simpler and fairer tax code that grows our economy, works for American families rather than D.C. special interests, and returns power from bureaucrats in Washington back to the people of Main Street.

“Today is an monumental step toward fulfilling those promises.

“But make no mistake: we must not allow ourselves to view today’s vote as a job completed. This is not a time for extended celebration or victory laps. This task will not be finished unless both chambers, the House and the Senate, come together and send a tax reform proposal to President Trump’s desk.

“It’s on all of us to make that happen. The American people have had it with political statements or symbolic victories—they want results, and the results won’t be delivered until President Trump signs the bill into law. Congress must run through the tape and finish what we promised. No more excuses.”

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Rep. Meadows’ Statement on Passage of House Tax Reform Bill, H.R. 1

2017/11/16

RELEASE:
Rep. Meadows’ Statement on Passage of House Tax Reform Bill, H.R. 1

Washington, D.C. – Rep. Mark Meadows (R-NC) released the following statement on the passage of H.R. 1, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act:

“Today, the House kept its promise to pass a historic tax reform proposal—and it’s a delivery that is long overdue. Moms, dads, small business owners, and working families across the country sent us to Congress to create a simpler and fairer tax code that grows our economy, works for American families rather than D.C. special interests, and returns power from bureaucrats in Washington back to the people of Main Street. Today is an monumental step toward fulfilling those promises.

But make no mistake: we must not allow ourselves to view today’s vote as a job completed. This is not a time for extended celebration or victory laps. This task will not be finished unless both chambers, the House and the Senate, come together and send a tax reform proposal to President Trump’s desk. It’s on ALL of us to make that happen. The American people have had it with political statements or symbolic victories—they want results, and the results won’t be delivered until President Trump signs the bill into law. Congress must run through the tape and finish what we promised. No more excuses.”

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Rep. Mark Meadows: A special counsel must investigate the Russia dossier, explain why Obama's FBI was involved

2017/11/15

By Rep. Mark Meadows | Fox News

For the past year, as our government has been mired in both an aimless and fruitless investigation into accusations of collusion between the Russian government and the 2016 Trump Presidential campaign, Democrats have insisted that Congress follow where the evidence leads in this investigation.

My Democratic colleagues are absolutely right. Congress should follow where the facts lead. However, they’re leading in a very different direction than the mainstream media narrative might suggest.

With regard to the original purpose of the investigation, Congress has held multiple hearings and interviewed dozens of witnesses looking into allegations of collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia. There is nothing there. It's time to move on.

But in the process of chasing a non-existent scandal, we’ve learned of a concerning fact pattern surrounding the Clinton campaign, and potentially the Obama administration’s, involvement in a 2016 targeted campaign, using salacious information from foreign intelligence officials, against then-GOP nominee Donald Trump. The information we’ve learned warrants the appointment of a special counsel to investigate how the Russian Dossier was created and why President Obama’s FBI was involved.

As we know from a recent New York Times report, Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign and the Democratic National Committee paid for research that was included in the now infamous Russian dossier, made public in January of this year by Buzzfeed and reported on by CNN.

We now know the Clinton campaign and the DNC paid ex-British intelligence officer Christopher Steele to compile the dossier with research provided by Russian intelligence officials. Much of the dossier contained claims that have either not been verified or have been directly refuted.

The fact that the Clinton campaign and the DNC paid intelligence officials in Russia for salacious and false information on President Trump is suspicious enough. But we’re also beginning to see evidence that raises questions about whether the Obama Justice Department may have inappropriately involved themselves in this project both before and after the 2016 Presidential campaign.

Consider the following timeline: In April of 2016, the Clinton campaign enlisted the law firm Perkins Coie to retain Fusion GPS, the firm behind the Russian Dossier. That very same month—April of 2016—President Obama’s campaign began paying more than $900,000 to Perkins Coie, the very same firm used by the Clinton campaign to create the Russian dossier.

We also know that in the weeks prior to the 2016 election, President Obama’s FBI tried to reach an agreement with Christopher Steele to pay for the Russian dossier, and the FBI actually ended up reimbursing some of those dossier expenses to Christopher Steele. It’s worth repeating to be clear: the FBI attempted to pay (and then reimbursed) costs for a Russian dossier that was being orchestrated by the Hillary Clinton presidential campaign. Strangely, the FBI has refused to answer questions and resisted any transparency on this issue.

Going one step further—we know that on January 6th of this year, President Obama’s intelligence officials, led by then FBI Director James Comey, briefed President-elect Trump on the contents of the Russian dossier. Following that January 6th briefing, there are reports that Obama Administration Intelligence officials almost immediately leaked details of the briefing to CNN. 4 days later, on January 10th, the dossier ended up being published by Buzzfeed.

Keep in mind that several media outlets had the dossier on hand prior to January 10th. None of them had printed it or reported on it since the claims within could not be verified.

This is an alarming timeline that leaves a myriad of disconcerting questions, but the specific points of interest can be boiled down into a few specifics:

Why did President Obama’s campaign begin paying almost a million dollars to the very same firm the Clinton campaign used to fund the dossier? Why did they begin making payments in the very same month the Clinton campaign began paying for the dossier?

Why did President Obama’s FBI attempt to pay Christopher Steele for the Russian Dossier? Why was President Obama’s FBI involved in paying for a political project the Clinton campaign was orchestrating? Again, the FBI has refused to answer these questions and resisted any transparency on this issue.

Why brief the president and president-elect at all on the dossier if much of the dossier could not be verified? Or, if President Obama’s intelligence officials had reason to treat the dossier seriously, why did they wait two months after the election until January 6th to brief the President and President-elect?

And why was the Obama administration’s meeting with President-elect Trump leaked to CNN just four days after the briefing if, again, the dossier could not be verified?

At minimum, we must recognize that there are legitimate, unanswered questions about whether the Obama Justice Department involved themselves in a political project targeting then-candidate Donald Trump—a suggestion that has far more evidence behind it than the directionless investigation into Trump/Russian collusion.

The American people deserve answers to those questions. They demand answers to those questions.

It’s our government’s responsibility to find them by appointing a special counsel to investigate. 

Republican Mark Meadows represents North Carolina's 11th Congressional District and is chairman of the House Freedom Caucus and a member of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee.

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Rep. Meadows' Special Order Speech on Russian Dossier

2017/11/08

RELEASE:
Rep. Meadows’ Special Order Speech on Russian Dossier

Washington, D.C. – Rep. Mark Meadows (R-NC) joined several members of the House Freedom Caucus Tuesday evening in a special order, addressing unanswered questions surrounding the Obama Justice Department’s handling of multiple issues, including the Clinton email investigation, the Uranium One deal, the Fusion GPS ‘Trump Dossier,’ and others. The members participating included Reps Andy Biggs (R-AZ), Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-FL), Rep. Jim Jordan (R-OH), Rep. Trent Franks (R-AZ), and more.

“For the past year, as our government has been mired in a fruitless, aimless investigation on accusations of collusion between the Russian government and the 2016 Trump Presidential campaign,” Meadows said, “my colleagues on the other side of the aisle have insisted that Congress follow where the evidence leads in this investigation. I’m here to tell you today that I agree wholeheartedly—Congress should follow where the facts lead.”

“However, they’re leading in a very different direction than the mainstream media narrative might suggest.”

Meadows focused his speech on the timing of the ‘Russian dossier’—the same dossier that was paid for by the Clinton campaign and the Democratic National Committee—to target then-Republican nominee for President, Donald Trump.

“We’ve learned of a fact pattern surrounding the Clinton campaign, and potentially the Obama Administration’s, involvement in a targeted campaign, using salacious information from foreign intelligence officials against then-candidate Trump.

The conclude the speech, Meadows identified four major questions Congress should examine:

  1. Why did President Obama’s campaign begin paying almost a million dollars to the very same firm the Clinton campaign used to fund the dossier, in the very same month the Clinton campaign began paying for the dossier?
  2. Why did President Obama’s FBI attempt to pay Christopher Steele for the Russian Dossier? Why was President Obama’s FBI involved in paying for a project that the Clinton campaign was orchestrating?
  3. Why brief the President at all on the dossier if much of the dossier could not be verified? Or, if President Obama’s intelligence officials had reason to treat the dossier seriously, why did they wait two months after the election until January 6 to brief the President?
  4. Why was the President’s meeting with President-elect Trump leaked to CNN four days after the briefing if, again, the dossier could not be verified?

To watch the full speech, click here.

Twitter link


Rep. Meadows speaks on the House floor

 

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RELEASE: Rep. Meadows on ABC This Week

2017/11/06

RELEASE:
Rep. Meadows on ABC This Week

Washington, D.C. – On Sunday, Rep. Mark Meadows (R-NC) appeared alongside Rep. Peter King (R-NY) on ABC’s This Week with George Stephanopoulos. The two members discussed the new GOP tax reform proposal, which is going through the committee amendment process beginning today.

“It's a work in progress,” Meadows said, but “preliminary numbers look very good in terms of economic growth. As I have looked at this particular bill, it appears that we should be able to get a 3.5 to 3.6 percent bump in GDP growth. When we do that, it means higher wages and a stronger economy.”

Meadows once again addressed the concern on increasing the deficit in the short run, reiterating that while he would prefer to cut both spending and taxes, the economic growth and relief for working families is worth the short-term exposure.

“Over a longer period of time, some 10 to 15 years, we believe that the economic growth will outweigh any short-term deficit increase that we see,” said Meadows, “so even though we're looking at increasing the deficit in the short run, over a 15-year period, we could have these tax cuts paid for because of economic growth.”

You can watch the full interview on Rep. Meadows Facebook page or on his YouTube channel.

 


Rep. Meadows interviewing on ABC This Week

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Congress Can Strengthen Trump's Regulatory Reforms

2017/11/06

Congress can pass a law to codify President Trump's executive orders on regulatory reform. Shutterstock

With pressing public policy debates over topics like healthcare, taxes, and infrastructure at the top of Americans’ minds, it is easy to forget that the U.S. regulatory system hasn’t undergone a significant update since 1996 . This is a problem because outdated, costly, and ineffective regulations place a substantial drag on the economy and trap Americans in ever-growing piles of red tape.

To change this, Rep. Mark Meadows (R-NC) introduced HR 2623, the Lessening Regulatory Costs and Establishing a Federal Regulatory Budget Act of 2017. This bill would require executive agencies to repeal two existing regulations for each new economically significant regulation that is issued. The bill would also make sure that the estimated costs of most new regulation are at least equaled by the ones that are eliminated.

In the following interview, Rep. Meadows explains how Congress can encourage economic growth, enhance public oversight, and help small business owners by making regulatory reform one of its top priorities in 2018 .

Jared Meyer: Your push for codifying a one in, two out regulatory reform sounds a lot like one of President Trump’s first executive orders. Why does Congress need to act when the executive branch has made cutting regulations a top priority?

Rep. Mark Meadows: We should applaud President Trump for his decision to prioritize regulatory reform. One of the biggest promises he made to voters during his campaign was that he would get to work bringing the regulatory state under control. Starting in his first month in office, he’s kept his promise.

At the same time, the reality is that governing by executive actions is easy to reverse when a new administration takes over the White House. Many of President Trump’s early directives have been reversing unconstitutional, overreaching, or damaging executive orders from President Obama. What we’re finding out through these first nine months is that if you govern with just the stroke of the pen—as President Obama famously said and did—it’s just as easy to undo those actions with a different stroke from the same pen.

President Trump understands this, and that’s why he’s insisting that Congress take action on issues like Obamacare, tax reform, etc. If we legislate these changes, like what we’re pushing for with our two-for-one bill, then our accomplishments can last beyond the Trump administration.

JM: How do you respond to people who argue that America’s regulatory system is working just fine?

MM: I can tell you that if people are saying that, none of them live in my district. The costs that the regulatory state puts on families, small business, and the economy as a whole are astronomical. Putting aside the high cost to the economy (some estimates place it at over $2 trillion every year), compliance expenditures place a significant burden on American companies—particularly manufacturers. For example, the National Association of Manufacturers conducted a 2012 study which concluded that the average U.S. company pays $9,991 per employee per year just to comply with federal regulations. Manufacturers pay around double that at an average of $19,564 per employee. Those are mind-boggling figures.

These costs are one reason why regulatory reform is needed so badly. To put the magnitude of this problem in context, consider the numerical impact President Trump’s executive order is already having. Even though agencies are still regularly issuing new regulations, the President’s effort to reduce the Code of Federal Regulations has saved $22 million as of August—far surpassing the goal of a net regulatory cost of $0. Agencies have responded to the administration’s clear message and been aggressive in their approach. Many of them have begun comprehensive reviews not only of their regulations, but of their guidance documents, policies, and information collections to understand what specific regulations in our system are unnecessarily burdensome to job creators and workers.

The President’s performance in this area has been exactly what voters asked of him. Now, it’s critical that Congress follow his lead and not let this opportunity go to waste. We have to make sure that these regulatory reforms can last beyond the Trump administration .

JM: Besides two-for-one, are there any other regulatory reforms that you think are necessary?

MM: Beyond codifying the President’s directive, what this is really about is changing the culture of Washington, D.C. and how our government approaches regulating. Those wondering why such a change in culture is needed should look no further than one of the main campaign slogans the President used throughout 2016—“Drain the Swamp.” When Americans refer to this phrase, they are worried that D.C. politicians and lobbyists don’t have the public’s best interests in mind when making decisions on how to impose and enforce regulations.

Besides our one-in, two-out bill, a badly needed regulatory reform bill is the Regulations from the Executive in Need of Scrutiny Act (REINS Act), a bill that I’ve co-sponsored in the past. I must applaud Senator Mike Lee as he’s discussed the issue extensively since he was elected.

One of the major flaws of our regulatory process is that Congress has delegated rulemaking to agencies like the EPA that aren’t directly accountable to voters . Agencies then take this authority and run with it, often crafting new regulations or interpretations that have little to no basis in law. This system allows Congress to ‘pass the buck’ and avoid accountability from unpopular regulations that voters oppose. The REINS Act would address much of this problem by requiring Congress to approve any new rule with a major impact on the economy, or annual costs over $100 million. That’s what Congress should have been doing all along.

Ultimately, the culture of our government must return its focus to where it rightfully belongs—on the best interests of the American people. I think that if anyone looked at our 180,000-page Code of Federal Regulations, they’d find that much of what our government involves itself with does not serve their interests. That’s what we’re trying to fix, and I believe that we will succeed.

JM: Excessive regulation holds back the United States’ economic potential. President Trump and many members of Congress understand that dramatic reforms to the regulatory state are needed to promote economic opportunity and increase economic growth. Thankfully, many legislative options can create lasting, positive changes to the federal regulatory process. The Lessening Regulatory Costs and Establishing a Federal Regulatory Budget Act of 2017 is clearly one of these reforms.

Jared Meyer is a senior research fellow at the Foundation for Government Accountability and a senior fellow for the new economy at the Beacon Center of Tennessee. Follow him on Twitter here.

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Meadows Meets with McConnell to Discuss Tax Overhaul

2017/11/02

House Freedom Caucus Chairman Mark Meadows met with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell late Wednesday afternoon to discuss a tax overhaul and outline potential stumbling blocks, among other topics.

“To suggest at this point that tax reform is a done deal on the House side would be missing some of the subtle cues that would indicate that there are still some negotiations to take place,” the North Carolina Republican said, referring to changes that would likely be needed between the bill’s scheduled release Thursday and the markup that is expected to begin Monday.

However, he still expressed confidence that the effort will prove successful.

“We’re going to get tax reform done,” Meadows said. “It may be a little messy. It may not be as fun as we all would have liked to have seen it be over the last few weeks, but we’re going to get it done. And failure is not an option.”

Meadows said he requested the meeting with the Kentucky Republican to give him a feel for where House conservatives are on upcoming legislative matters like the tax overhaul and funding the government.

“The Freedom Caucus is either blamed or credited, depending on your point of view, for a whole lot of things that happen or don’t happen here on Capitol Hill. And I felt like it was important that he understand where the general thinking is on tax reform and certainly military funding and the like.”

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Rep. Meadows’ Statement on Passing of Clyde Mayor, Jerry Walker

2017/11/01

RELEASE:
Rep. Meadows’ Statement on Passing of Clyde Mayor, Jerry Walker

Washington, D.C. – Rep. Mark Meadows (R-NC) released the following statement on the passing of Jerry Walker, who served as the Mayor of Clyde, NC, for 13 years:

“Debbie and I were very saddened to hear of the passing of our friend and Clyde’s Mayor, Jerry Walker. Anyone who knew Mayor Walker would tell you there were many ways to describe him: an Air Force veteran, a first class public servant, and a household name in the town of Clyde—but more than that, Mayor Walker was a man of honor, character, and faithful service to others. He served his country and his community in his last days in the very same way he did during his first days: with integrity and with the well-being of others foremost in his mind. His was truly a life well lived. Jerry will be missed and we are praying for his wife, Joann, and their family.”


Rep. Meadows with Mayor Jerry Walker
(photo from Vicki Hyatt of The Mountaineer)

 

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RELEASE: Rep. Meadows Chairs Hearing on Regulatory Reform

2017/10/26

RELEASE:
Rep. Meadows Chairs Hearing on Regulatory Reform

Washington, D.C. – Yesterday, Rep. Mark Meadows (R-NC) chaired a hearing in the Oversight and Government Reform Subcommittee on Government Operations to follow up on regulatory task forces and examine their progress in eliminating needless, outdated regulations from the federal registry.   

In January, President Trump signed Executive Order 13771, titled "Reducing Regulation and Controlling Regulatory Costs.” The order directed agencies to repeal two existing regulations for each new significant regulation added, and to do so in such a way that the total cost of regulations does not increase.

The results have been overwhelmingly positive. Rep. Meadows opened the hearing saying “It’s not every day that we get to hold a hearing to highlight good news about federal regulations.”

In July, the Administration announced that in the course of just five months, the federal government achieved a reduction in net regulatory costs. And while still issuing new regulations, the Trump Administration has actually saved $22 million dollars.

“To put it in abstract terms,” Rep. Meadows said, "at the end of the Obama Administration it would have taken someone three years and 177 days to read through the entire Code of Federal Regulations.  As of today, that number has been reduced to two years and 217 days.  This amounts to over a 25 percent decrease in the size of the Code of Federal Regulations. This type of progress in shrinking federal regulation is unheard of and it is all thanks to the President’s regulatory reform agenda.”

Agencies continue to make progress.

“Most agencies have begun comprehensive reviews not only of their regulations, but guidance documents, policies, information collections, and other written materials that impose burdens on the public,” Meadows said. “Many agencies have already started to ‘clean house’ by starting the process to repeal or amend regulations.”

In May, Meadows introduced H.R. 2623, the “Lessening Regulatory Costs and Establishing a Federal Regulatory Budget Act” to codify President Trump’s executive order.

To watch Rep. Meadows’ full opening statement, click here.

 


Rep. Meadows chairing a hearing on regulatory reform

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Rep. Meadows’ Statement on Passage of FY18 Budget Resolution, H. Con. Res. 71

2017/10/26

RELEASE:
Rep. Meadows’ Statement on Passage of FY18 Budget Resolution, H. Con. Res. 71

Washington, D.C. – Rep. Mark Meadows (R-NC) released the following statement on the passage of the FY18 Budget Resolution, H.Con.Res 71—the vehicle to consider tax reform under reconciliation rules:

“Today’s vote is an important step toward keeping the promise made in November to deliver a simpler and fairer tax code that grows our economy and works for American families rather than D.C. special interests. Bold, aggressive tax reform will be the best thing we can do to return power back to the people and rein in Washington’s out of control spending.

But this is not a time for celebration—now we have to finish the job. The American people couldn’t care less about messaging victories, party politics, or political infighting. The American people want to see results, and it’s time Congress get serious about delivering them—quickly. No more excuses. Let’s get tax reform done.”

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Rep. Mark Meadows speaks in support of moving Israeli Embassy to Jerusalem

2017-11-08 22:02:14


Rep. Mark Meadows - Special Order Speech on Russian Dossier

2017-11-08 21:54:49


Rep. Mark Meadows on ABC "This Week" - 11-15-17

2017-11-06 16:20:11


Rep. Meadows Discusses Senate Budget and Tax Reform on Morning Joe - 10/26/17

2017-10-26 20:38:10


Rep. Mark Meadows Opening Statement - Gov Ops Hearing on Regulatory Reform Task Forces

2017-10-26 00:16:17


Rep. Meadows Discusses Tax Reform with Wolf Blitzer - 10/23/17

2017-10-23 21:07:48


Rep. Mark Meadows on Meet the Press Daily - 9-28-17

2017-09-29 15:08:46


Rep. Mark Meadows Discusses Tax Reform on Morning Joe - 9-28-17

2017-09-28 15:19:31


Rep. Meadows - A Message to the Black Robe Regiment Pastor Conference

2017-09-22 16:31:02


Rep. Meadows on MSNBC's Morning Joe - 9-8-17

2017-09-15 18:28:53


Rep. Meadows with Wolf Blitzer CNN - 9-5-17

2017-09-15 18:22:07


Rep. Meadows - A Message to Trinity Baptist Church

2017-09-15 17:51:25


Oversight Committee: Rep. Meadows' Questioning in Hearing Examining Free Speech on College Campuses

2017-07-27 20:24:23


Rep. Meadows - Foreign Affairs Committee with Ambassador Nikki Haley

2017-06-28 22:02:53


Rep. Meadows Joins Hallie Jackson on MSNBC - 6-22-17

2017-06-22 20:55:15


Rep. Meadows (R-NC) Joins MSNBC - 6-14-17

2017-06-14 17:32:19


Rep. Meadows (R-NC) Discusses Tax Reform on CNBC - 6-13-17

2017-06-13 20:36:21


Rep. Meadows on Tax Reform - Opening Remarks at Heritage Foundation

2017-06-12 19:24:32


Rep. Meadows on CNN - 6-8-17

2017-06-09 17:02:08


CBS: Rep. Meadows on 'Road to Nowhere'

2017-05-31 19:24:33


Contact Information

1516 Longworth HOB
Washington, DC 20515
Phone 202-225-6401
Fax 202-226-6422
meadows.house.gov

After working as a small business owner for 27 years, Representative Mark Meadows brings a business-style approach to Washington, D.C.

From owning and selling a successful restaurant to building a development company, Mark understands what the 63.7 million people in the United States who are self-employed or work for small businesses need to grow their businesses.  He believes real job creation comes from the private sector, not the federal government.  Mark recognizes that regulations are stifling job growth in this country and without a budget to set spending priorities, our federal government will continue to spend beyond its means.

While serving on the Committees on Oversight and Government Reform, Foreign Affairs, and Transportation and Infrastructure, Mark will hold the government accountable, protect American citizens and interests abroad, and ensure we have a modern transportation network which meets the needs of Western North Carolina and our country as a whole.

He is dedicated to providing top-notch constituent services to North Carolina’s 11th Congressional District and committed to upholding his Christian values and conservative principles while serving in Congress.

Mark lives in Jackson County with his wife Debbie. They have two college-age children, Blake and Haley.


Serving With

Walter Jones

NORTH CAROLINA's 3rd DISTRICT

Virginia Foxx

NORTH CAROLINA's 5th DISTRICT

Mark Walker

NORTH CAROLINA's 6th DISTRICT

David Rouzer

NORTH CAROLINA's 7th DISTRICT

Richard Hudson

NORTH CAROLINA's 8th DISTRICT

Robert Pittenger

NORTH CAROLINA's 9th DISTRICT

Patrick McHenry

NORTH CAROLINA's 10th DISTRICT

George Holding

NORTH CAROLINA's 13th DISTRICT

Ted Budd

NORTH CAROLINA's 13th DISTRICT

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