Kristi Noem

Kristi Noem

SOUTH DAKOTA

Noem: The Pursuit of Dreams

2018/01/19

The whole experience of being a first-time parent can be overwhelming. There’s unmatched joy, of course, but there are also so many questions. How are we going to provide for this baby? What kind of crib do we get? Cloth or disposable? What if something goes wrong? Boy or girl? What kind of person will they become? What kind of parents will we be? Are we ready for this? From the moment Bryon and I found out we were pregnant, we were asking these questions, we were planning, we were praying, and we were dreaming of our kids’ futures.

This January, I introduced legislation that would allow parents to start investing in those dreams from the very beginning too. More specifically, my bill would let parents name their unborn children as beneficiaries of 529 accounts, which are tax-advantaged savings plans designed to help families save for future education costs. If enacted, this would mean unborn children would have a spot in our tax code, which they currently do not. It’s another step toward ensuring every child – born or yet-to-be-born – is given the dignity they deserve.

President Trump has been a good working partner in this goal. His appointment of Judge Neil Gorsuch to the Supreme Court, for instance, was a critical win for the pro-life cause. President Trump also signed legislation I backed empowering states to defund Planned Parenthood and put his name on legislation that bans taxpayer-funded abortion, for the time being.

I’m working to push more legislation his way too. In October, the House passed the Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act, which would prohibit abortion once a baby can feel pain (approximately 20 weeks). While I believe life begins at conception (and have backed legislation that would define life as such), I was pleased to get the House to move a step in the right direction. Unfortunately, the Senate has yet to act on the legislation.

I also helped introduce the No Taxpayer Funding for Abortion Act, which prohibits taxpayer-funded abortions as well as taxpayer-funded subsidies for healthcare plans covering elective abortions. A 2016 Government Accountability Office study showed abortions were paid for with federal dollars through Obamacare exchanges, which we had previously been told would not be the case. According to the Susan B. Anthony List, “Under Obamacare, as many as 111,500 additional abortions per year could be heavily subsidized by taxpayers.” That is unacceptable, and the No Taxpayer Funding for Abortion Act would fix it. While the House has passed it, the Senate has not taken it up at this point.

The House also passed legislation this January that requires healthcare professionals to provide care to babies who are born alive after a failed abortion attempt.

Additionally, I’ve cosponsored legislation that would prohibit gruesome dismemberment abortions. I’m also working to drive the Heartbeat Protection Act forward, which would protect unborn children whose heartbeats can be detected. And while it’s not as widely covered as abortion is, I’ve been very supportive of pro-life efforts to prohibit physician-assisted suicide.

These issues are important because they center around the foundation of a society – life. On January 19, I joined hundreds of thousands of people, including many South Dakotans, in marching for life. It was a powerful experience. Together, we marched for the unborn, for their future, and for their right to pursue their dreams.

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House Passes Noem-Backed Bill to Protect Babies Born Alive after Failed Abortions

2018/01/19

Rep. Kristi Noem today led the U.S. House of Representatives in passing the Born-Alive Abortion Survivors Protection Act, which requires healthcare professionals to provide care to babies who are born alive after a failed abortion attempt. Noem helped introduce this legislation in 2017.

“So many questions go through the mind of first-time parent, not least of which is ‘What if something goes wrong?’” said Noem. “There’s no doubt that a lot of things can go wrong in a pregnancy, but we find comfort in the fact that there are teams of healthcare professionals there who will do everything they can to save that baby. But what if they stepped back and refused to deliver care to your child? That would be unacceptable. And yet, when a baby is born alive after a failed abortion, that same healthcare professional may not deliver life-saving care. This legislation ensures that every life is given the dignity and care a human being deserves.”

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Noem Applauds Trump's Protection of Religious Liberty for Healthcare Workers

2018/01/18

Rep. Kristi Noem today applauded a Trump administration announcement to better protect doctors, nurses, and other medical professionals who have moral or religious objections to providing some services, including abortions or certain transgender treatments. Noem, who has urged the administration to support such steps, helped introduce legislation in January 2017 that would achieve similar goals. More specifically, Noem’s Conscience Protection Act would guard healthcare professionals from discrimination if they refused to perform an abortion.

“No job should force a person to deny their deepest moral or religious convictions – convictions that are constitutionally protected,” said Noem. “With the establishment of the Conscience and Religious Freedom Division, the Trump administration is taking up a cause I’ve been fighting for years and seriously defending our rights of conscience. By doing so, President Trump is reaffirming the beliefs held by our Founding Fathers: A nation that protects religious liberty, diversity of thought, and individual rights is a freer and stronger nation.”

Today’s announcement by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) effectively creates a new Conscience and Religious Freedom Division within the HHS’s Office for Civil Rights.

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Rep. Kristi Noem Visits Rapidly Growing Company In Tea

2018/01/17

Weisser Distributing company is one of the fastest growing companies in the U.S. They were able to make the Inc. 5000 list in 2017 for that exact reason.

Rep. Kristi Noem took a visit to the company today to congratulate them on this honor. She was able to take a tour of the company, speak with employees, and talk with management to learn more about the companies success.

Much of their success has come through the minds of South Dakota kids, and for Noem, that is so important.

“That’s exactly what we need to highlight in South Dakota, and we need to create more companies like this and help them be successful. In order to offer those types of jobs to our students”, Noem said on Wednesday, January 17th.

Noem also said that Weisser is a fantastic example of companies with a multitude of positions and creative jobs can be found right here in South Dakota.

She hopes that as Weisser continues their growth, that more and more kids will stay in South Dakota for their careers.

Weisser Distributing began in 1978, and has grown to just over 101 employees, with sales in 2017 topping $50 million. They plan for their rapid growth to continue in the year 2018.

Noem also helped answer a few of their questions when it came to the new tax reform.

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Noem Introduces Bill Enabling Parents to Save for Unborn Child's Education

2018/01/16

Rep. Kristi Noem today introduced H.R. 4794, the Investing for Tomorrow Act, which would allow for unborn children to be named as beneficiaries of 529 education savings accounts. If enacted, this would mark the first time unborn children would be explicitly named in the tax code. The provision was included in the House-passed tax reform bill, but was removed due to Senate rules.

“Like so many parents, Bryon and I started dreaming of our children’s future from the moment we found out we were pregnant,” said Noem. “We dreamed of who they’d become, what they’d do, and the kind of people they’d be. With this legislation, parents will finally be able to start investing in that future too.”

529 accounts are tax-advantaged savings plans designed to help families save for future education costs. Through tax reform, 529 accounts were expanded and enhanced, now allowing parents to use the money for elementary, secondary and post-secondary education.  Additionally, tax reform allowed for the money within 529 accounts to be rolled over to ABLE accounts tax free, which are tax-advantaged savings accounts for those with disabilities and their families.

In addition to allowing unborn children to be named as beneficiaries, Noem has cosponsored separate legislation that would allow 529 accounts to be used for homeschool-related expenses. 

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Representative Kristi Noem Speaks to Walleyes Unlimited

2018/01/13

A South Dakota representative was in Sioux Falls today to speak to a South Dakota organization.

Representative Kristi Noem spoke at the Scheels conference room to people from South Dakota Walleyes Unlimited.

Many topics Noem discussed with members in a question and answer included the tax reform bill, lead tackle for fishing and meandered versus non-meandered waters in South Dakota.

Representative Noem says speaking to the members today is a great opportunity to talk to people who are passionate about bringing people to South Dakota’s waters.

“The South Dakota wildlife, a group here has been very active in maintaining water, but also promoting fish habitat.  And the fact and opportunity that people want to have to go out and take their families and enjoy some time in the water,” says Representative Noem

Representative Noem says she is also working on around a half a dozen proposals to change the farm bill that was enacted in 2014.

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Ivanka Trump Thanks Noem for Tax Reform Fight

2018/01/12

Following a week of news regarding pay and benefit increases that have resulted from tax reform, Ivanka Trump said this of Rep. Kristi Noem’s work on H.R.1, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act:

“As tax reform was being debated, there wasn't a conversation I was in with Kristi that she didn't passionately advocate for working families. Kristi fought hard to secure a doubled Child Tax Credit and to ensure that working families will continue to get a break for child care expenses through the Child and Dependent Care Credit. I'm grateful for Kristi's partnership and friendship and very much enjoyed working with her to achieve major middle income tax relief.”– Ivanka Trump
[emphasis added]

Noem worked closely with Ms. Trump in the fight for middle-income families. As a result of their efforts, the Child Tax Credit was doubled to $2,000 per child. Additionally, tax reform eliminated the Child Tax Credit’s marriage penalty.

The Child and Dependent Care Credit (also referred to as “Child Care Credit”) was preserved as a result of Noem’s fight too. As such, families can continue to claim up to $3,000 of child care costs per child, receiving a reimbursement of as much as 35 percent of the qualifying expenses.

For families, these credits offer incredible financial benefits. Last week in Brookings, Noem met with young families who would benefit from the provisions. She explained that the newly enacted tax reform package lowers individual tax rates, doubles the Child Tax Credit, and doubles the standard deduction, meaning the first $24,000 a couple makes is now tax free. If the old tax code was in place, a young couple with three children making $78,000 would owe more than $2,600 in taxes for 2018. With tax reform, their tax bill drops to $99 because of these benefits.

In addition to these tax cuts, many families are also benefiting from pay raises and better benefits. This week, South Dakota-based Great Western Bank announced it would increase the company’s minimum wage to $15 per hour, offer bonuses, and enhance employees’ health care offerings.

Walmart, which employs more than 5,300 people in South Dakota, also announced it would increase its starting wage by $2 per hour, dish out big bonuses, and expand their paid maternity and paternity leave policies.

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Noem Urges VA to Pull Aside Curtains, Allow Ft. Meade Chapel's Stained Glass to Show

2018/01/12

Rep. Kristi Noem wrote a letter to Veterans Affairs Secretary David Shulkin this week, urging him to pull aside the curtains and allow the Christian-themed stained glass within the Ft. Meade hospital’s chapel to shine through.

“The VA’s policy regarding religiously neutral spaces has the effect of obscuring the cherished windows within the Ft. Meade hospital’s chapel for a majority of those who visit,” said Noem. “While I understand our veterans come from diverse backgrounds, many South Dakotans have shared concerns with me about the chapel’s windows being covered. There seems to be a commonsense, alternate path forward. Rather than keeping the windows continuously covered, only opening the blinds when a service is occurring, the windows should be left uncovered as a matter of course, with the option to cover them should a religiously-neutral space be requested. Let’s pull aside the curtains and let this cherished stained glass shine through.”

The Veterans Health Administration’s Directive 1111 requires that VA facilities’ chapels be “religiously neutral, reflecting no particular faith tradition” at all times, unless a religious service is occurring. In the case of chapels that were built with permanent religious symbols in the walls or windows, like Ft. Meade, a separate religiously neutral room must be designated. It was decided that Ft. Meade would comply with Directive 1111 by instituting a policy whereby the windows are covered with blinds or curtains, except when a religious service is in process. This policy ostensibly ensures a consistently religiously neutral space, save for occasions dedicated specifically for religious services. Unfortunately, the policy also has the effect of obscuring the cherished windows for a majority of those who visit the chapel.

In her letter, Rep. Noem proposes that the windows be left uncovered as a matter of course, with the option to cover them at any time, using the existing blinds and curtains, should a religiously-neutral space be requested. This solution could respect the desires of most chapel visitors for the windows to remain uncovered, while ensuring a religiously neutral space, when appropriate.

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January 11, 2018

Dear Secretary Shulkin,

Thank you for your efforts, and those of the entire Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), to ensure our country lives up to the promises it has made to our veterans. I write to you today to make you aware of an issue that has been of concern to many of my constituents for several years.

The Fort Meade VA Medical Center is located in Veterans Integrated Services Network 23, and is one of two VA medical centers in western South Dakota. It serves veterans from across South Dakota, Nebraska, North Dakota, Wyoming, and Montana. While the Ft. Meade hospital obviously serves veterans’ physical ailments, it also serves their spiritual needs, especially in its chapel facility.

The chapel features two permanent stained glass windows – one interior and one exterior – that display Christian themes. These windows are visually impressive and have considerable value to those who visit the chapel regularly. Indeed, I understand one of the windows, which is approximately 30 years old, was a gift from several veteran organizations that raised money for its installation. Unfortunately, since 2014, these windows have been largely obscured in an effort to comply with Veterans Health Administration (VHA) Directive 1111, published in 2016.

As you know, Directive 1111 requires that VA facilities’ chapels be “religiously neutral, reflecting no particular faith tradition” at all times, unless a religious service is occurring. In the case of chapels that were built with permanent religious symbols in the walls or windows, like Ft. Meade, a separate religiously neutral room must be designated. I am told space is at a premium at Ft. Meade, so no separate religiously neutral space can be offered.

I understand that Ft. Meade’s leadership, in conjunction with the national VHA, decided to comply with Directive 1111 by instituting a policy whereby the windows are covered with blinds or curtains, except when a religious service is in process. This policy ostensibly ensures a consistently religiously neutral space, save for occasions dedicated specifically for religious services. Unfortunately, the policy also has the effect of obscuring the cherished windows for a majority of those who visit the chapel.

In discussions with some who utilize the chapel facility at Ft. Meade, it has come to my attention that this policy may be objectionable to many of the veterans served there. Chapel patrons seem to prefer leaving the windows visible and accessible for visitors. To accomplish that end, I believe there may be an alternative path forward: the windows may be left uncovered as a matter of course, with the option to cover them at any time, using the existing blinds and curtains, should a religiously-neutral space be requested. This solution could respect the desires of most chapel visitors for the windows to remain uncovered, while ensuring a religiously neutral space, when appropriate.

While much thought and discussion has gone into the current policy at Ft. Meade, I respectfully urge you to respond to my constituents’ concerns by considering the alternative I have proposed.

Thank you for your assistance. If you have questions, please contact my office at 202-225-2801.

Sincerely,

Kristi Noem

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Noem Statement on Supreme Court Reviewing Online Sales Tax Collection

2018/01/12

Rep. Kristi Noem today issued the following statement, after the Supreme Court’s announcement that it will review South Dakota’s case regarding online sales tax collection:

“In the wake of today’s announcement, the need for legislative action on e-fairness is more urgent than ever before. If the Supreme Court rules in South Dakota’s favor, it could become a marketplace free-for-all. A South Dakota small business, for instance, could be forced to comply with 1,000 different tax structures nationwide without the tools necessary to do so. My legislation provides a necessary fix.

“The reality is that brick-and-mortar retailers, which provide thousands of jobs in our hometowns, have been closing at an alarming rate. State and local governments are similarly imperiled. Facing budget crises due to out-of-state retailers avoiding sales tax collection, states and localities are forced to raise taxes or consider levying new taxes, even after dramatically reducing spending. My legislation would remove the out-of-state retailer’s competitive advantage and level the playing field for our Main Street businesses. Moreover, it would protect small businesses and citizens alike from aggressive audits by out-of-state governments. The time for action is now.”

In 1992, the Supreme Court ruled in Quill v. North Dakota that states were prohibited from collecting sales taxes from out-of-state online retailers. Individuals were still liable to pay the tax, but it would not be collected at the point of sale. If South Dakota’s case is successful in the U.S. Supreme Court, Quill v. North Dakota will be overturned. As a result, businesses could be immediately responsible for collecting sales taxes from buyers and then remitting it to states. To add to the confusion, this requirement would be determined state-by-state. There would be no infrastructure in place to facilitate these transactions, however, potentially causing a free-for-all.

To put it in perspective, there are more than 1,000 different tax structures nationwide. A small business in South Dakota would need to be able to comply with each of them to sell nationwide – and they’d be subject to audits in each of these jurisdictions. There is software that can help figure these tax rates out, but the business is still liable if mistakes are made and that software could be cost prohibitive for smaller businesses.

Avoiding this free-for-all has been a focus of Rep. Noem’s since she was first elected, and she’s introduced legislation to manage the transition while protecting South Dakota small businesses. More specifically, H.R.2193, the Remote Transactions Parity Act, would:

  • Allow states to require remote sellers to collect sales tax from the buyer, according to the taxes owed in the buyer’s location. (essentially legislatively reversing Quill v. North Dakota)
  • Require states to provide software (free of charge) to businesses located within their borders. This software would be capable of figuring the buyer’s tax rate.
  • The businesses using this software would be largely protected from audit. Instead, it is the software provider that is subject to audits.
  • The legislation includes a phase-in period to ensure businesses have time to comply. 
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Noem: A Thin Blue Line

2018/01/12

A lot is asked from our law enforcement officers, especially at a time when crime is on the rise. Sadly, South Dakota’s violent crime rate nearly doubled between 2005 and 2015. If you look at domestic aggravated assault cases alone, police handled 129 in 2012. By 2016, they dealt with 276 cases. Drugs are also on our streets in increasing quantities, ripping families and friendships apart in many cases. Still, South Dakota’s brave law enforcement officers step up to meet the needs of our communities each and every day. And I, for one, am incredibly grateful.

January 9 marked National Law Enforcement Appreciation Day, and while many South Dakotans recognize the tremendous role officers play throughout the year, it is nice to set aside a special day of gratitude.

Like many in South Dakota, I have been thrilled to see President Trump make law enforcement a priority again and am proud to help drive his agenda in the House.

Weeks after President Trump took the Oath of Office, for instance, the House passed the American Law Enforcement Heroes Act, which would allow Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS) grants to be used for hiring and training law enforcement officers. This is a critical program, and over the last five years, South Dakota has received $13 million in COPS grants.

To give law enforcement added support in the fight against drugs, I helped pass the Transnational Drug Trafficking Act, which broadened the scope of people subject to criminal prosecution for drug trafficking. I also voted for the Comprehensive Addition and Recovery Act to enhance coordination between criminal justice, substance abuse agencies, and first responders. Both bills became law and are in addition to the work I’ve done to strengthen our border security.

Additionally, I’m working to help law enforcement in indirect ways. For instance, the CUFF Act, which I introduced, prohibits individuals with outstanding felony warrants or parole violations from receiving certain Social Security benefits. Hardworking taxpayers should not have to pay people who are fleeing from the law. Not only is it unfair to ask taxpayers to do so, it’s self-defeating to subsidize someone’s attempt to shirk law enforcement. As Staci Ackerman, Executive Director of the South Dakota Sheriffs’ Association said, the bill would “limit [a wanted felon or parole violator’s] ability to avoid justice using taxpayer dollars to evade capture.” This bill was passed in the House and is awaiting a vote in the Senate.

The Thin Blue Line Act was another bill I’m proud to support. In 2016, more than 110 law enforcement officers were killed in line-of-duty incidents, according to the FBI. Of these more than 60 died as a result of felonious acts. Another 57,000 officers were victims of line-of-duty assaults. This cannot be tolerated. The Thin Blue Line Act would make targeting or killing a police officer or first responder a determining factor in potential death penalty cases. Moreover, we passed, and President Trump signed, the Public Safety Officer’s Benefits Improvement Act, which aimed to reduce the backlog of families waiting on approval for survivor benefits.

While I don’t know what it’s like to be in their shoes, I’m hopeful the choices I’ve made better equip law enforcement as they carry out their day-to-day duties. Thank you to all who serve and create that critical blue line that keeps our families and communities safe.

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Delegation Introduces Bill to Transfer Federal Land to Custer County, South Dakota

2018/01/11

U.S. Sens. John Thune (R-S.D.) and Mike Rounds (R-S.D.) and U.S. Rep. Kristi Noem (R-S.D.) today introduced Senate and House companion versions of the Custer County Airport Conveyance Act, legislation that would transfer approximately 66 acres of Black Hills National Forest System land to Custer County, South Dakota. The U.S. Forest Service (USFS) has agreed to sell this land to the Custer County Airport, giving it full ownership of all acres that the airport occupies. A portion of the Custer County Airport currently occupies USFS land under a longstanding USFS agreement. Both parties have agreed to the terms of the property sale and transfer that are specified in the legislation.

“After consulting with Custer County Commissioners, the airport, and the U.S. Forest Service, we concur with the Forest Service and Custer County that this legislation is the quickest and most efficient means to transfer this land,” said Thune, Rounds, and Noem. “We are pleased that all of the parties negotiated in good faith and arrived at this agreement, which would give Custer County Airport full ownership of all land on which the airport operates.”

This land transfer is necessary so Custer County can make additional improvements to its airport. Custer County has agreed to pay the USFS the appraised value of the land and all costs associated with the conveyance.

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Transfer of land agreement reached

2018/01/11

A land transfer has been agreed upon between the Custer County Airport and the U.S. Forest Service. The transfer will allow Custer County to make improvements to the airport. Currently, part of the airport resides on land belonging to the Forest Service.

The Custer County Airport Conveyance Act was introduced to the House and Senate, Thursday, by South Dakota Rep. Kristi Noem and Sens. John Thune and Mike Rounds.

“After consulting with Custer County Commissioners, the airport, and the U.S. Forest Service, we concur with the Forest Service and Custer County that this legislation is the quickest and most efficient means to transfer this land,” said Thune, Rounds and Noem in a joint statement. “We are pleased that all of the parties negotiated in good faith and arrived at this agreement, which would give Custer County Airport full ownership of all land on which the airport operates.”

Custer County will buy the land the airport is on which is around 66 acres. The county will also pay for all costs related to transferring the land from the U.S. Forest Service.

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House Passes Noem-Backed Provisions to Protect Tribal Sovereignty on Labor Issues

2018/01/10

Rep. Kristi Noem today led the U.S. House of Representatives in passing provisions to protect tribal sovereignty on labor issues. The legislation, which many South Dakota tribes have long supported, would clarify that the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) does not have jurisdiction over tribally owned and operated businesses.


“In 2004, the National Labor Relations Board unilaterally decided that it needed to meddle in the affairs of tribally-owned businesses on tribal lands, threatening the foundation of Indian law, the principle of tribal sovereignty, and the limits that ought to be placed on the federal government,” said Noem. “Subjecting Native American tribes to National Labor Relations Board rules is yet another sign that some still want the federal government to interfere in tribal decision making. I’m proud to see provisions pass the House that withdraw the government’s heavy hand and again reinforce our commitment to tribal sovereignty.”

In 2004, NLRB unilaterally determined that the National Labor Relations Act applied to tribally owned businesses on tribal lands.  Tribes have expressed great concerns over the impact of this ruling.  In 2011, Noem introduced the Tribal Labor Sovereignty Act, which would clarify in law that tribally owned businesses on tribal lands are not subject to the jurisdiction of the National Labor Relations Act.  As a result, NLRB would not have administration and enforcement powers on reservation land for tribally owned businesses.

The Tribal Labor Sovereignty Act was included in S.140, which passed the House of Representatives today.  The provision was endorsed by Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe, the Oglala Sioux Tribe, and the Great Plains Tribal Chairman’s Association.

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Because of Tax Reform, Great Western Bank Offers Employees Raises and Better Benefits

2018/01/10

South Dakota-based Great Western Bank today announced it would increase wages and offer better benefits for employees as a result of tax reform. More specifically, the company’s investments include:

  • Raising the minimum wage to $15;
  • A special one-time $500 bonus or wage increase for nearly 70% of its workforce;
  • Enhancement to employees’ health care offerings effective for the 2018 enrollment period; and
  • The doubling of its annual contribution to its Making Life Great Grants community reinvestment program.

“It is important to reward the hard work and dedication of our employees with this special bonus, the minimum wage hike and the health care enhancements. Tax reform gave us the opportunity to make these investments and increase the support we provide to the communities we serve,” said Ken Karels, Chairman, President and CEO of Great Western Bancorp, Inc. “We greatly appreciate Rep. Noem’s leadership in negotiating a tax reform package that enables companies like ours to invest even more in our people and communities. Kristi’s success on tax reform is already having a tremendous impact on the lives and livelihoods of those within the Great Western Bank family.” [emphasis added]

“This is what tax reform was designed to do,” said Rep. Kristi Noem, who served on the tax reform negotiating committee. “Many South Dakotans will be seeing a direct tax cut of more than $1,000, which in and of itself is real money. But on top of that, most of Great Western’s employees will be receiving a bonus and better benefits as a result of tax reform. After years of sluggish growth, things are getting better for folks across the state. I applaud Great Western for making these investments into South Dakota’s people and communities.”

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Letter: Tax bill: Americans get to take home more money

2018/01/09

I’d like to take this opportunity to address the new tax reform law. This legislation does a very important thing. It allows people to keep more of their own money.

Certain politicians in Washington, who have never worked in the private sector claim this is a tax cut for the rich, because it lowers the corporate tax rate to 21 percent. This claim is so patently false, even the Washington Post – hardly a bastion of right wing propaganda – has admitted this claim is false. First of all, corporations don’t pay taxes. They pass them on to the consumers.

This tax reform bill will help me and I am nowhere near rich, as it will help young families with children even more dramatically.

Keep something in mind, it is “our money,” not the government’s money and we are better off managing it than they are.

As for me, I want to thank Rep. Kristi Noem, Sen. John Thune and of course, President Donald Trump, for getting this bill through. Please, don’t believe what people on the far political left say about this tax reform bill. I am convinced at this point, their hatred of the president has clouded their judgment on this matter.

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Noem touts tax cuts during Watertown stop

2018/01/06

With the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act now officially law, U.S. Rep. Kristi Noem, R-S.D., made a stop at Titan Machinery in Watertown Friday morning to tout the legislation’s benefits for South Dakota taxpayers.

Passed along party lines, the bill has elicited polarized reactions nationally.

As a member of the Ways and Means Committee and the conference committee that reconciled the House of Representatives’ and Senate’s versions of the bill, Noem pushed back on the negative claims, particularly that the bill is primarily aimed at benefiting millionaires and billionaires.

“We ended up with a final package lowering rates for everybody,” she said. “On the individual side, we lowered rates for all income levels. We have made bigger deductions for small families.”

Particularly, Noem claimed, the tax bill will benefit small businesses.

“We put in place a brand new provision in the small business rate that any business that’s under $315,000 per year automatically gets a 20 percent deduction off their business account,” Noem said. “That’s a huge tax cut for small businesses. We had 83,000 jobs in the state tied to small businesses. That was a big priority for us going forward.”

Noem also said reduction of the corporate tax rate from 35 percent to 21 percent was long overdue.

“We had the highest corporate rate in the world. Frankly, we saw a lot of companies and manufacturing businesses going to other countries because every other country had lower corporate rates than us,” she said.

Noem tied the lowering of the corporate tax rate along with raising the tax deductions of the cost for certain types of property from a cap of $500,000 to $2.5 million under Section 179 of the Internal Revenue Service Code.

“That is one of the tools that is going to give us the most growth in this country,” Noem said of the deduction cap increase. “Since this bill has been passed, we’ve had over 100 companies saying they’re coming back to the United States and building here because of this law. In South Dakota, somebody told me yesterday that there will be 20 brand new projects. A lot of them announced they’re going to give wage increases, including at $15 per hour.”

In comments to the Public Opinion, Noem said a Congressional Budget Office estimation that the tax reform bill would likely add $1.5 trillion to the national debt over the next decade doesn’t provide the whole picture.

“The CBO looks at everything in a static way. They don’t take into account reactions that will happen to tax reform. I understand their limited scope gives them a number like that,” Noem said. “For us, when we did these policies, we looked at what people’s reactions would be to tax cuts. All projections show that people will reinvest in their businesses and families, turn that money over and grow our economy, which turns that federal deficit around very quickly.

“We’ll see growth that will get more people off programs and into jobs paying more taxes. That adds up to more revenue in the country.”

Noem also spoke at some length on the renewal of the farm bill that is being discussed in Congress.

Noem’s stop in Watertown on Friday was part of a statewide tour promoting the bill.

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Tax Reform is Built for Ag, Says Noem During Tax Cuts and Jobs Tour

2018/01/05

Rep. Kristi Noem today met with South Dakota farmers at Titan Machinery in Watertown as part of her statewide Tax Cuts and Jobs Tour. As the only farmer/rancher on the tax reform negotiating team, Noem championed many of South Dakota agriculture’s priorities. This includes immediate expensing and interest deductibility, as well as a 20 percent small business deduction that many producers and agriculture co-ops can take advantage of. While Noem continues to fight for a full and permanent repeal of the Death Tax, exemption levels were doubled through tax reform.

“Our farm has been in the family for more than a century,” said Noem. “We’ve survived bad droughts, bad floods, and bad tax policies. While we can’t change the weather, it was the opportunity of a lifetime to change the tax policies that have held agriculture back in the past. We work in a highly leveraged and unpredictable industry, so our priorities look different than that of a typical business. With interest deductibility, immediate expensing, and lower tax rates, the new tax code was clearly built with farmers and ranchers in mind.”

Throughout the tax reform debate, Noem met with hundreds of South Dakotans to discuss the plan – both in the state and in her Washington, D.C. office. Noem also earned Volga producer Scott VanderWal the opportunity to testify before the House’s tax reform committee about agriculture’s priorities.

Noem, who served on the final tax reform negotiating team, is visiting Rapid City, Brookings, Sioux Falls, Huron, Watertown, Aberdeen and Pierre as part of her statewide Tax Cuts and Jobs Tour. In each community, Noem is sitting down with South Dakotans to discuss tax reform’s impact on their businesses, paychecks and families.

Highlights of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act for Agriculture

First-ever 20% tax deduction that applies to the first $315,000 of joint income for many farms and ranches as well as for agriculture co-ops.

Allows for immediate expensing, which will help farmers upgrade their operations by letting taxpayers depreciate 100 percent of qualified expenses the year they are purchased.

Expands interest deductibility, which allows farmers and ranchers to deduct interest payments and is critical for a highly-leveraged industry like agriculture.

Doubles Death Tax exemption levels for the first eight years.

Preserves options for like-kind exchanges.

Expands Section 179, which allows farmers and ranchers to deduct the cost of some types of property as an expense, allowing farmers to better manage depreciation.

Expands cash accounting to protect farmers and others from paying taxes on things they have yet to receive payment on.

Lowers individual tax rates, setting them at 0%, 10%, 12%, 22%, 24%, 32%, 35%, and 37%, benefiting the majority of producers, who often file as individuals.

Nearly doubles the standard deduction, meaning the first $24,000 a married couple makes or the first $12,000 an individual makes is tax free.

Provides unprecedented support for families.

  • Doubles the Child Tax Credit to $2,000 per child.
  • Eliminates the “marriage penalty.”
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Noem hits Huron to talk tax reform

2018/01/05

Julie Hoffmann can't find enough workers for her business.

Hoffmann, the owner of East River Nursery in Huron, looked for solutions to her growing workforce problem from U.S. Rep Kristi Noem on Thursday as she stopped by Huron for her Tax Cuts and Jobs Tour. The Republican's visit was part of a statewide tour to discuss the impact a tax overhaul will have on businesses, paychecks and families.

"I thought why not come in and see what she has to say about things," Hoffmann said following Noem's talk at Double D Western LLC in Huron. "And the clarification on the tax is good, and knowing all of that. I haven't had time to really look into it and see what's going on."

Noem, who said many believe the recent tax reform bill ignores "everyday people," decided to take to the road and answer questions herself. In her Huron stop, the focus was small business, drawing in at least 10 local business owners.

"We have 83,000 jobs in South Dakota directly tied with small businesses ..." Noem said to the crowd. " ... When you give a tax cut to small businesses, that's when you automatically see that economic growth, so I was thrilled with where we ended up."

Highlights to the tax reform bill, which was signed into law just before Christmas, offers a first-ever 20 percent tax deduction that applies to the first $315,000 of joint income earned by small businesses, Noem said. This is the "biggest tax cut that small businesses" have gotten, she added.

Noem continued to say the bill offers a 100 percent business expensing option that will allow businesses to write off purchases in order to invest and continue expanding.

"We focused on growth so if it was actually going to cause businesses to expand, relocate in the country then that was something we wanted to do," said Noem....

Business owners peppered Noem with questions beyond the tax reform bill, including health care — which Noem said was the No. 1 issue she hears about now that the tax bill has passed.

With continuous complaints about rising health care rates, Noem said the tax bill will hopefully keep "a little bit more money" in South Dakotans' pockets, including Hoffmann's.

"It looks like there's going to be some relief for us," Hoffmann said. "Maybe we can afford a better insurance package for our employees."

The next hot button issue was sales tax, and the hit businesses have taken with online shopping. Several small business owners raised concerns with Noem, and they worry about keeping business alive with growing online purchases.

But Noem assured the crowd she has "the bill to fix it." Her bill, Noem said, would create a federal clearinghouse that would collect sales tax. And if a South Dakotan shops in California, the tax would be collected at South Dakota's rate.

And she claims to have President Donald Trump's support, who she said has committed to her that the bill will get passed.

"That would fix a lot of what's wrong in South Dakota," Noem said, talking about the hurdles she has yet to pass with the bill. "These people are paying property taxes, they're hiring folks, they're giving them jobs, and we're undercutting them every time we let somebody buy something online."

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Noem: New Year, New Tax Code

2018/01/05

It’s a new year, and Americans have a new tax code. On January 1, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act took effect, delivering relief to families across the spectrum. I’ve received many questions from folks since the bill’s passage: How will it impact my family? What does it mean for South Dakota? During the first few days of January, I fought the frigid temps and hit the road to answer many of these questions.

The first stop was Black Hills Bagels in Rapid City. Debra Jensen first opened the bakery in 1997 and has since expanded to two locations. South Dakota is home to around 83,000 small businesses like this. They employ nearly 60 percent of our state’s workforce, and through tax reform, many will have access to a new small business deduction, lower tax rates, and better expensing tools. Each of these provisions were designed to keep more money locally, better ensuring that what we make in South Dakota is spent in South Dakota to grow wages and create jobs at home.

After making a few more stops in Rapid City, we headed east. In Brookings, I dropped by the home of Luke and Emma Perkins. They’ve been married a little over four years, have two beautiful children with another due in March, and work for Equip Campus Ministries at SDSU. For young families like theirs, we double the standard deduction, meaning the first $24,000 a couple makes is tax free. The Child Tax Credit is doubled to $2,000 per child. And on top of that, we lowered tax rates.

Let’s say Luke and Emma make $78,000 as a couple. Under the old tax code, the family’s 2018 tax bill would be more than $2,600. With tax reform, it would drop to $99.

Next, I held a lunch with some young, Sioux Falls moms. We talked about the standard deduction and Child Tax Credit as well, but we also spent some time discussing the Child Care Credit. South Dakota has the highest rate of working moms in the country. The Child Care Credit is specifically designed to reduce the burden of day care expenses for working families.

Additionally, we touched on some of the other individual benefits that are there to give a little boost when you reach big life milestones. This includes the mortgage interest deduction, retirement savings options, and the enhanced 529 education savings plans.

After a stop at Double D Western in Huron and a night at home with my own family, I stopped in at Titan Machinery in Watertown. Farmers need a lot of expensive equipment to operate each year. To help producers manage cashflow, tax reform includes immediate expensing of the equipment they buy at places like Titan.

The week’s final stop was at Aberdeen’s 3M plant. By bringing our business tax rate in line with the rest of the developed world’s, we make America a more competitive place to do business. Through tax reform, we also eliminated the incentives that currently reward companies for shifting jobs, profits, and manufacturing plants abroad. It’s time to put America first.

Already, we’re seeing new jobs being created while dozens of American companies have given hundreds of thousands of employees significant raises or bigger Christmas bonuses as a result of tax reform.

I believe it’s incredibly important that South Dakotans understand exactly what was included in the tax reform package, which is why I took to the road in recent weeks. There’s a lot of misinformation out there and you deserve the facts. While no tax reform package will be perfect for every family, this legislation is packed with benefits for hardworking South Dakotans that keep more money in your pockets and our communities. I was proud to be part of negotiating this landmark legislation. Happy New Year – and welcome to a new tax code.

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Noem Meets with South Dakota Families about Tax Reform's Individual Benefits

2018/01/04

Rep. Kristi Noem today met with South Dakota families in Brookings and Sioux Falls as part of her statewide Tax Cuts and Jobs Tour. A mother of three, Noem championed critical family provisions, including the Child Tax Credit, the Child Care Credit, and the Family Credit, while also helping to negotiate a significantly larger standard deduction and lower tax rates. Noem served on the final negotiating team for H.R.1, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act.

“I came to the tax reform negotiations as a small business owner, a farmer and rancher, but most importantly, as a mom,” said Noem. “Strong families are the cornerstone of a successful community, and I fought to make sure our tax code now reflects that. By doubling the Child Tax Credit, eliminating the marriage penalty, maintaining the Child Care Credit and enhancing 529 education savings options, we’re strengthening families. Moreover, by retaining the mortgage interest deduction, medical expense deduction, and popular retirement savings options, we’re helping ease the financial burden on families when they reach those important milestones. No reform package will be perfect for everyone, but the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act reflects our priorities better than almost any tax plan in history. It strengthens families and creates a stronger future for all Americans.”

In Brookings, Noem met with families in the home of Luke and Emma Perkins, where they discussed how the newly enacted tax reform package lowers individual tax rates, doubles the Child Tax Credit, and doubles the standard deduction, meaning the first $24,000 a couple makes is now tax free. If the old tax code was in place, a young couple with three children making $78,000 would owe more than $2,600 in taxes for 2018. With tax reform, their tax bill drops to $99 because of these benefits.

In Sioux Falls, Noem hosted a lunch with young moms and addressed key provisions, such as the mortgage interest deduction, 529 education savings plans, and retirement savings options.

Noem, who served on the final tax reform negotiating team, will visit Rapid City, Brookings, Sioux Falls, Huron, Watertown, Aberdeen and Pierre as part of her statewide Tax Cuts and Jobs Tour. In each community, Noem will sit down with South Dakotans to discuss tax reform’s impact on their businesses, paychecks and families.

Highlights of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act for Families

Lowers individual tax rates, setting them at 0%, 10%, 12%, 22%, 24%, 32%, 35%, and 37% so people can keep more of their hard-earned money.

Nearly doubles the standard deduction, meaning the first $24,000 a married couple makes or the first $12,000 an individual makes is tax free.

Provides unprecedented support for families.

  • Doubles the Child Tax Credit to $2,000 per child.
  • Eliminates the “marriage penalty.”
  • Preserves the Child and Dependent Care Tax Credit (also known as the Child Care Credit) to better support working parents.
  • Creates a $500 Family Credit for non-child dependents, such as college students living at home or parents.

Preserves the Home Mortgage Interest Deduction for existing mortgages as well as for newly purchased homes up to $750,000.

Permanently retains the Medical Expense Deduction and lowers the threshold for two years at a pre-Obamacare level of 7.5% of adjusted gross income.

Improves vehicles for education by allowing families to use 529 accounts to save for elementary, secondary, and higher education.

Retains popular retirement savings options, such as those for 401(k)s and Individual Retirement Accounts.

Continues the deduction for charitable contributions.

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Contact Information

1323 Longworth HOB
Washington, DC 20515
Phone 202-225-2801
Fax 202-225-5823
noem.house.gov

Committee Assignments

Ways and Means

U.S. Representative Kristi Noem is a wife, mother, experienced rancher, farmer, and former small business owner. Kristi was born and raised in rural Hamlin County in northeastern South Dakota and still lives there today with her husband, Bryon, and their three children, Kassidy, Kennedy, and Booker.

Kristi learned the value of hard work early in life from her father. He put Kristi, her sister and two brothers to work on the family farm at a young age caring for the cattle and horses and helping with planting and harvest. After graduating from high school, Kristi began attending college at Northern State University in Aberdeen. When her father died unexpectedly in a farming accident, Kristi returned to the family farm and ranch full-time. Her father’s death left a huge absence, so Kristi stepped up and helped stabilize the operation and provided leadership when it was needed most.

Kristi’s work on the farm and ranch didn’t go unnoticed. In 1997 she received the South Dakota Outstanding Young Farmer award and in 2003 she was honored with the South Dakota Young Leader award.

Kristi’s experience as a small business owner shaped her understanding of government and its purpose. Too often, government is inefficient and ineffective, simply getting in the way of small businesses and entrepreneurs who wish to create jobs and grow our economy. Realizing this, Kristi decided to get involved to try and make a difference.

Her service includes the South Dakota State Farm Agency State Committee, the Commission for Agriculture in the 21st Century, the South Dakota Soybean Association, and numerous other boards and committees. In the fall of 2006, Kristi was elected as the 6th District Representative to the South Dakota House of Representatives.

Kristi quickly realized she could serve her district, and the State of South Dakota, more effectively in a leadership position. So in her second term she ran for, and won, the position of Assistant Majority Leader in the State House, where she served until 2010.

Kristi was first elected to serve as South Dakota’s lone Member of the U.S. House of Representatives on November 2, 2010.

While keeping up with her Congressional duties in Washington, D.C. and work with constituents in South Dakota, Kristi continued to take undergraduate courses from South Dakota State University. In December 2011, Kristi graduated from SDSU with her Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science.

On November 6, 2012, Kristi was re-elected to the U.S. House of Representatives where she continues to serve on the Agriculture Committee and House Armed Services Committee.

Kristi enjoys helping her daughters compete in rodeo and 4-H. She has been a 4-H leader for 14 years. Kristi is also an avid hunter. She particularly enjoys pheasant hunting on the homestead and archery elk with her brothers.


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