Kevin Yoder

Kevin Yoder

KANSAS' 3rd DISTRICT

Rep. Yoder to Host Two Free Medicare Open Enrollment Assistance Events for Seniors

2017/09/08

Washington, DC – Representative Kevin Yoder (R-KS) will host two Medicare Open Enrollment Assistance Events to provide help to seniors during the Medicare Open Enrollment Period. These events will be held Tuesday, October 17th from 9:00 AM to 1:00 PM at the Olathe Community Center and Wednesday, November 8th from 9:00 AM to 12:00 PM at the Wyandotte West Library.

Trained volunteers from the Senior Health Insurance Counseling for Kansas (SHICK) program will be on hand at the event to provide one-on-one assistance to seniors who have questions or who wish to make changes to their plans.

The Medicare Open Enrollment Period extends from October 15th through December 7th.  Medicare beneficiaries who wish to make changes or enroll for the first time need to bring their Medicare card, any current prescriptions (including dosage and frequency), and a list of preferred pharmacies. The event is free and open to everyone.

For additional information, or if you are unable to attend, please contact Congressman Yoder’s District Office in Overland Park at (913) 621-0832.

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 17:

WHAT:           Medicare Open Enrollment Assistance Event

WHEN:           Tuesday, October 17

             9:00 AM to 1:00 PM 

WHERE:        Olathe Community Center

             1205 E. Kansas City Road

             Olathe, KS 66061

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 8:

WHAT:           Medicare Open Enrollment Assistance Event   

WHEN:           Wednesday, November 8

             9:00 AM to 12:00 PM 

WHERE:        Wyandotte West Library - Auditorium

             1737 N 82 Street

             Kansas City, KS 66112

###

Read More

Yoder Statement on Trump-Pelosi-Schumer Debt Limit Deal

2017/09/08

Washington, DC  – This morning, Representative Kevin Yoder (R-KS) issued the following statement after voting against President Donald Trump’s deal with House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) and Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer (D-NY) to attach a debt limit increase to the relief package for victims of Hurricane Harvey:

"I’m deeply frustrated with today’s vote and how it came about. I was proud to cast my vote in favor of a clean emergency relief package for the victims of Hurricane Harvey earlier this week. That package was targeted, necessary, and narrowly met the immediate needs of victims. It spent taxpayer dollars wisely and didn’t take advantage of emergency needs to achieve other controversial priorities. Today’s package didn’t meet those standards.

“It’s my hope that in December we can work together to make long-term, meaningful spending reforms and pass the fiscally responsible Appropriations bills our committee has diligently put together throughout this year. I strongly believe there are bipartisan compromises that work for the American people, but today’s short-term fix that kicks the can down the road wasn’t one of them.”

 

###

Read More

VIDEO: Yoder Joins Kansas Delegation in Support for Bob Dole Congressional Gold Medal Act

2017/09/06

Washington, DC – Last night, the House of Representatives unanimously passed the Bob Dole Congressional Gold Medal Act, which honors Bob Dole’s service to the United States in the military and in Congress by awarding him a Congressional Gold Medal. The bill was introduced by Senator Pat Roberts (R-KS) and Representative Lynn Jenkins (R-KS), and the rest of the Kansas Delegation joined as original cosponsors. It now heads to the President’s desk for signature into law. During debate on the bill, Representative Kevin Yoder (R-KS) spoke on the floor of the House in support.

Click here to watch Yoder's remarks on video.

The following are Yoder’s remarks as prepared for delivery:

“Mr. Speaker, I rise today to voice my strong support for H.R. 3332, a bill to award the Congressional Gold Medal to Senator Bob Dole.

“Service. Sacrifice. Statesmanship. These are the words that describe Senator Bob Dole, one of Kansas's proudest sons and one of the greatest men to ever serve in Congress.

“Born and raised in Russell, Kansas, Senator Dole attended the University of Kansas where he excelled as a three-sport varsity athlete for the Jayhawks. His college career was interrupted by World War II, when he answered his country’s call and enlisted in the U.S. Army. He would distinguish himself in the service, earning several decorations and becoming seriously wounded in combat in Italy. Although those wounds would cause a lifelong disability for him, Senator Dole did not shy away from the challenges they presented. He instead used that personal experience to help others – becoming a fierce advocate for disability rights and the father of the Americans with Disability Act.

“His career in public services spanned over 45 years, beginning with his election to the Kansas House of Representatives in 1951 and ending with his presidential campaign and retirement from the Senate in 1996. His legislative and political accomplishments during this time are almost too many to count. His top priority has always been service to others, whether it is people with disabilities, Kansas farmers, or his fellow veterans. Senator Dole has always put his country ahead of himself, and he stayed grounded in his strong Kansas roots.

“I can think of no one more fitting to be recognized with a Congressional Gold Medal. As a Member of the Kansas delegation, I am truly honored to follow in the footsteps of Senator Dole by serving our great state and our great country in Congress. He is an inspiration to me, and an enduring example of what statesmanship and public service should look like. I ask my colleagues in the House to support this bill and to join me in working daily to uphold Senator Bob Dole’s legacy of service and civility in Congress.”

###

Read More

Yoder Statement on Administration's Announcement to Wind Down DACA Program

2017/09/05

Washington, DC  – This morning, the Trump Administration announced that it is rescinding the Obama-era Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program with a six month wind-down period. Representative Kevin Yoder (R-KS) issued the following statement after the announcement:

"I have great sympathy for minors that were illegally brought to the United States through no fault of their own and who know no other country than the United States of America. We are a nation of immigrants. Yet, we are also a nation that values the rule of law, and President Obama’s DACA order was an unconstitutional abuse of executive authority. The Administration is right to restore proper balance of powers under our Constitution.

"I opposed President Obama's ‘temporary stopgap measure’ as he called it five years ago - in which he said ‘this is not amnesty, this is not immunity, this is not a path to citizenship’ - because it would leave many undocumented immigrants in limbo, with no real status. That has now proven to be the case.

"While the program may have been conceived with good intentions, it has served as a magnet, bringing tens of thousands of new immigrants, exacerbating our illegal immigration challenges, and creating a humanitarian crisis at the border.

"The President has given Congress a six-month window to act on immigration reform, and that's exactly what we should do. We must secure our borders, repair our broken visa program, and provide needed reforms and certainty and stability for minors. We must pursue policies that are both compassionate and restore the rule of law in our country.

"I do not favor deporting 'dreamers' but their status is a decision that can only be made by an act of Congress and should be one that improves our legal immigration process and secures our border. Otherwise we will be left with a piecemeal mess, which is what we have on our hands today.”

###

Read More

ICYMI: Bloomberg Editorial Board Endorses Yoder-Murphy PACE Act

2017/09/05

Editorial: Congress Should Give Families More Credit

Bloomberg Editorial Board

September 5, 2017 | To view online, click here.

Congress returns to Washington this week to a meat grinder: In short order, members must raise the debt ceiling, pass a budget (to avoid a government shutdown) and deliver emergency relief to the victims of Hurricane Harvey. So it might seem unrealistic to suggest that they strike a bipartisan deal on child-care tax credits.

Yet this is precisely the kind of small but meaningful legislation that would show the American public that Congress is, in fact, capable of doing something -- and, not incidentally, it would measurably improve the lives of millions of American families.

A House bill introduced by Republican Kevin Yoder and Democrat Stephanie Murphy would expand and update the Child and Dependent Care Tax Credit, which was created in 1976 and allows parents to offset child-care expenses incurred while they work or go to school. Though well-intended, the policy has outlived its effectiveness: The maximum benefit of $2,100 for a family with two or more children has remained constant since 2001, during which time child-care costs have increased by more than 20 percent, and the tax credit is not refundable.

The new legislation, which mirrors a bill introduced in the Senate by Republican Richard Burr and Angus King, an independent, addresses those flaws. It increases the value of the credit, from 35 percent to 50 percent of total child-care expenses for the lowest earners, and indexes it to inflation. Critically, the bill makes the child-care tax credit refundable, which means that a family of four making less than $15,000 annually could receive a rebate check of as much as $3,000. 

From the standpoint of public policy, the Yoder-Murphy plan is modest. When it comes to political feasibility, however, that’s a virtue. The Joint Committee on Taxation estimates that the bill will cost the government an additional $37.2 billion over 10 years -- not trivial but not extravagant either, especially compared to the assortment of tax breaks that disproportionately benefit the wealthy.

Making the credit refundable will allow 6 million more taxpayers to benefit from it. The portion of overall benefits that flow to families making $30,000 or less would more than double, to 15 percent. They won’t, however, reach everyone. Because only households with out-of-pocket child care expenses are eligible to claim the credit, the Yoder-Murphy bill leaves out poor families with a stay-at-home parent or those who rely on unpaid relatives to take care of their children. Nonetheless, the bill manages to pull off a rare feat: it enlarges the safety net while promoting social policies that reward work.

The American public, with good reason, has lost any confidence in the ability of Washington politicians to work together on even the most common-sense reforms. Taking action on child-care affordability would be a small step toward restoring that faith. Lawmakers shouldn’t pass it up.

Members of the Bloomberg editorial board are Francis Barry, Clive Crook, Mary Duenwald, James Gibney, Philip Gray, James Greiff, Nisid Hajari, Tobin Harshaw, Jonathan Landman, Timonthy Lavin, Michael Newman, Timothy L. O’Brien, Therese Raphael, Katy Roberts, Stacey Shick, David Shipley, Mark Whitehouse, Francis Wilkinson, Ferdinando Giugliano, and Mike Nizza. 


###

Read More

ICYMI: Topeka Capital-Journal Editorial Board Commends Yoder for Response to Events in Charlottesville

2017/08/16

Editorial: The right response to Charlottesville

By The Topeka Capital-Journal Editorial Board

August 15, 2017 | To view online, click here.

The president of the United States has a responsibility to act as a lucid and calm moral guide in times of crisis. This is particularly important when the crisis involves social and political hatred in the country — when every American should be reminded that we’re citizens under the same flag who deserve equal dignity regardless of our race or religion.

After all, unity may be the most historically indispensable concept in the U.S. — our national motto is e pluribus unum (“out of many, one”) and the first sentence of the preamble to our Constitution contains the words “in Order to form a more perfect union.”

The grisly events in Charlottesville last weekend demanded a response that would reaffirm these principles. There were neo-Nazis and Ku Klux Klan members marching through the city to protest the removal of a statue of Robert E. Lee. When hundreds of counterprotesters confronted them, violent clashes ensued and dozens of people were injured. In the most horrifying incident of the day, a 20-year-old white nationalist named James Alex Fields smashed through a dense crowd of protesters in his car, killing 32-year-old Heather Heyer and injuring 19 others.

After the violence in Charlottesville had been broadcast on the news and social media all Saturday morning, President Trump made a formal statement: “We condemn in the strongest possible terms this egregious display of hatred, bigotry and violence on many sides. On many sides.” When reporters asked him to comment on the hideous white supremacy on display in Charlottesville — as well as the white nationalist members of the “alt-right” who have expressed support for him — he fell silent and left the room.

Instead of explicitly denouncing the neo-Nazis and other white supremacists at the rally — one of whom had just attempted to murder as many people as possible — Trump decided to lecture the “many sides” that were involved. Would he care to outline which “sides” were equally culpable in his mind? After receiving a torrent of well-deserved criticism from all ends of the political spectrum, Trump relented and attacked the “KKK, neo-Nazis, white supremacists and other hate groups that are repugnant to everything we hold dear as Americans.”

But he had already missed his opportunity to unite the country against these repugnant groups with an immediate, forceful and explicit rejection of their revolting ideology. And on Tuesday, Trump reiterated what he said last weekend: “I thought what took place was a horrible moment for the country, but there are two sides to a story.”

Unlike Trump, most members of the Kansas congressional delegation didn’t equivocate about the issue of white supremacy. Almost all of them used words like “racism,” “bigotry” and “white supremacy” in their denunciations of the violence. While Sen. Pat Roberts said the “hatred &ignorance displayed by the violent &pathetic group in #charlottesville is unacceptable,” he also thought Trump’s first statement “pretty well covered it with a broad stroke.” He’s wrong. When it comes to neo-Nazis and the Ku Klux Klan, “pretty well covered it” isn’t good enough.

Rep. Kevin Yoder, on the other hand, distinguished himself with his criticism of Trump’s feeble response to the horrors in Charlottesville: “Any time that we don’t speak strongly in opposition to bigotry, racism and hatred, I think we’re giving oxygen and breathing room to let these groups flourish.” He also admonished Americans to “speak clearly and directly: white supremacy is an evil ideology that has no place in this world.”

If only Trump would have responded like that.

Members of The Capital-Journal’s editorial advisory board are Zach Ahrens, Matt Johnson, Ray Beers Jr., Laura Burton, Garry Cushinberry, Mike Hall, Jessica Lucas, Veronica Padilla and John Stauffer.

###

Read More

Yoder to Tour Local KinderCare, Host Roundtable Discussion on Rising Childcare Costs & PACE Act

2017/08/15

Overland Park, KS – On Wednesday, Representative Kevin Yoder (R-KS) will tour the Mastin Street KinderCare location and host a roundtable discussion with KinderCare officials, childcare experts, parents, and advocates, highlighting his Promoting Affordable Childcare for Everyone (PACE) Act. The bill makes important updates and reforms to the Child and Dependent Care Tax Credit (CDCTC) and Dependent Care Flexible Spending Accounts (FSAs) to help middle class and low-income families pay for care for children and other dependents.

According to the Economic Policy Institute, the average annual cost of care for one infant in Kansas is $11,201, which comes out to about $933 per month and almost 18 percent of a typical Kansas family’s income. It’s about 26 percent higher than the average cost of renting a home and about 52 percent higher than in-state tuition for a four-year public college. According to their research, childcare for two children – an infant and a four-year-old, for example – costs $19,152, which is about 31 percent of a typical family’s income.

Event Details:

WHO:             Representative Kevin Yoder

                        United States Congress – Kansas Third District

 

                        Rachel Dorman

                        Center Director

                        Mastin Street KinderCare

 

                        Kimberly Engelman

                        Chief Family & Community Engagement Officer

                        Child Care Aware of America

 

WHAT:          Tour of Mastin Street KinderCare

                        Roundtable Discussion on Lowering Childcare Costs

           

WHEN:          Wednesday, August 16, 2017

                        10:00 AM – 10:45 AM

 

WHERE:       Mastin Street KinderCare

                        10456 Mastin Street

                        Overland Park, KS 66212

PACE Act Summary:

The PACE Act makes important updates and reforms to the tax provisions that help families care for children and other dependents. Specifically, the bill:

  1. Improves and modernizes the Child and Dependent Care Tax Credit (CDCTC) by:
    • Making the credit refundable. This change will allow the credit to help low-income working parents, whose low or zero tax liabilities prevent them from benefiting from the current CDCTC.
    • Increasing the value of the credit. The PACE Act raises the value of the credit by 15% for all families.
    • Indexing the credit to inflation. This will help the CDCTC keep pace with rising childcare costs in the future.
  2. Enhances Dependent Care Flexible Spending Accounts (FSAs) by:
    • Increasing the amount of pre-tax dollars that families can put into FSAs from $5,000 to $7,500. This money is excluded from gross income and allows families to reduce their tax burden while paying for important care for dependents.
    • Indexing the new cap to inflation so that FSAs are updated steadily and families can save enough money to pay for childcare.

Impact:

The PACE Act will make tangible improvements to American families’ ability to pay for childcare. For example:

  1. Low income family of four making less than $15,000 a year:
    • Current law: receives zero CDCTC benefit.
    • PACE Act: maximum annual CDCTC refund of $3,000 to help pay for childcare.
  2. Middle class family of four making $55,000 a year:
    • Current law: maximum annual CDCTC benefit of $1,200.
    • PACE Act: maximum annual CDCTC benefit of $2,100, which is $900 more to help pay for childcare.

###

Read More

Yoder, Murphy Introduce Legislation to Help Families Struggling with Childcare Costs

2017/08/02

Washington, DC – Representatives Kevin Yoder (R-KS) and Stephanie Murphy (D-FL) have introduced the Promoting Affordable Childcare for Everyone (PACE) Act, legislation that makes important updates and reforms to the Child and Dependent Care Tax Credit (CDCTC) and Dependent Care Flexible Spending Accounts (FSAs) to help middle class and low-income families pay for care for children and other dependents.

Across the country, the high cost of childcare is a barrier for parents who try to work full time and provide safe, quality care for their children. In many states, the cost of full-time childcare is so high that it rivals the average costs of housing or in-state tuition at public universities. Lower-income families are hurt the most by this, as childcare costs on average make up more than 30 percent of their income.

According to the Economic Policy Institute, the average annual cost of care for one infant in Kansas is $11,201, which comes out to about $933 per month and almost 18 percent of a typical Kansas family’s income. It’s about 26 percent higher than the average cost of renting a home and about 52 percent higher than in-state tuition for a four-year public college. According to their research, childcare for two children – an infant and a four-year-old, for example – costs $19,152, which is about 31 percent of a typical family’s income.

“Paying for quality, affordable care for young children is one of the most important line items on every working family’s budget,” Representative Yoder said. “These days it’s become a larger and larger number, making it more and more difficult for families to find the right solutions, and in some cases even creating a disincentive for both parents to enter the workforce. As we work to reform our tax code in Congress, we’re working on ways to help Americans keep more of their hard-earned money and grow our economy so they can take home even more of it.

“That’s where the PACE Act comes in,” Yoder continued. “We’re modernizing the way the tax code treats childcare expenses by improving access to the childcare tax credit and flex spending accounts. More Americans will be able to pay for the cost of childcare, which means more Americans in the workforce helping our economy grow. It means more opportunity and more prosperity for the families who are the backbone of this country.”

“Raising a family is a blessing, but the rising cost of living has made it far too difficult for working and middle-class families to afford high-quality childcare—that’s why the bipartisan legislation we introduced today is so important,” Representative Murphy, who is herself a mother of two young children, said. “Oftentimes, parents are forced to leave the workforce or cut back on working hours to care for their children simply because they can’t afford expensive childcare. By helping to offset these costs, the PACE Act will help put high-quality childcare and early education within reach for more families.”

“The PACE Act will go a long way in assisting more working families afford the childcare their family needs,” Dr. Elanna Yalow, CEO KinderCare Early Learning Programs, said. “Modernizing the Child and Dependent Care Tax Credit and Dependent Care Flexible Spending Accounts as the PACE Act does will provide critical enhancements desperately needed by today’s low and middle-income working families in affording the quality childcare that parents both want and expect for their children.”

Bill Summary:

The PACE Act makes important updates and reforms to the tax provisions that help families care for children and other dependents. Specifically, the bill:

  1. Improves and modernizes the Child and Dependent Care Tax Credit (CDCTC) by:
    • Making the credit refundable. This change will allow the credit to help low-income working parents, whose low or zero tax liabilities prevent them from benefiting from the current CDCTC.
    • Increasing the value of the credit. The PACE Act raises the credit rate for all families, with a new top rate of 50 percent that phases down to 35 percent for higher-income families
    • Indexing the credit to inflation. This will help the CDCTC keep pace with rising childcare costs in the future.
  2. Enhances Dependent Care Flexible Spending Accounts (FSAs) by:
    • Increasing the amount of pre-tax dollars that families can put into FSAs from $5,000 to $7,500. This money is excluded from gross income and allows families to reduce their tax burden while paying for important care for dependents.
    • Indexing the new cap to inflation so that FSAs are updated steadily and families can save enough money to pay for childcare.

Impact:

The PACE Act will make tangible improvements to American families’ ability to pay for childcare. For example:

  1. Low income family of four making less than $15,000 a year:
    • Current law: receives zero CDCTC benefit.
    • PACE Act: maximum annual CDCTC refund of $3,000 to help pay for childcare.
  2. Middle class family of four making $55,000 a year:
    • Current law: maximum annual CDCTC benefit of $1,200.
    • PACE Act: maximum annual CDCTC benefit of $2,100, which is $900 more to help pay for childcare.

###

Read More

VIDEO: Yoder Pushes Reforms to Legal Immigration System

2017/07/28

Washington, DC – This week, Representative Kevin Yoder (R-KS) spoke on the floor of the House of Representatives about the need to reform our legal immigration system through passage of his Fairness for High-Skilled Immigrants Act. The bill would remove the per-nation caps on employment-based green cards that have caused massive backlogs in the system and create a merit-based approach where all equally-qualified, highly-skilled employees will receive green cards in the order they apply and based solely on the skills they are bringing to America.

To watch a video of Yoder's remarks, click here.

The following are Yoder’s remarks as prepared for delivery:

“Mr. Speaker, more than 700,000 high-skilled immigrant workers from India are in the United States today on temporary work visas.

“These people are working hard every day, helping grow our economy, and raising their children as Americans right here in our communities.

“But under our legal immigration system, they are essentially here as indentured servants, stuck on a cycle of temporary work visas, unable to change jobs or even start their own small businesses to create more American jobs.

“They’re stuck because of the arbitrary 7 percent per-nation cap on employment-based green cards.

“Right now, there is a mother in Greenland whose unborn child will be able to obtain permanent residence in America before someone from India who has already been working here for years.

“That’s absurd, and wrong.

“My bill, called the Fairness for High-Skilled Immigrants Act, would fix this problem.

“It would transition us to a first-come, first-serve merit based legal immigration system.

“It would help these people in need, and help create new jobs.

“Mr. Speaker, with more than 230 cosponsors, it’s time to pass this bill and get this done.”

###

Read More

VIDEO: House Passes Security Funding Package Including Chairman Yoder’s Legislative Branch Bill

2017/07/27

Washington, DC – This evening, the House of Representatives passed the Make America Secure Appropriations Act, a package of funding bills that include the Fiscal Year 2018 Defense, Military Construction and Veterans Affairs, Energy and Water, and Chairman Kevin Yoder’s (R-KS) Legislative Branch Appropriations Bill. The package provides funding for major security priorities, including border security, nuclear defense systems, veterans, active duty military, and Capitol Police, and passed by a 235-192 vote with Chairman Yoder’s support.

To watch a video of Chairman Yoder's floor remarks in support of the bill, click here.

Yoder’s portion of the bill maintains funding on the House more than 12 percent below 2010 levels and continues the policy of preventing any pay increases for Members of Congress for the eighth fiscal year in a row, funding legislative branch operations at a level $228 million below the President’s request. In response to last month’s shooting at the GOP practice for the Congressional Baseball Game, it makes structural changes that will improve security at the Capitol and at congressional events in Members’ districts.

“We are leading by example by tightening our belts and spending taxpayer dollars wisely, and we are continuing the policy of preventing any pay increases for Members of Congress,” Chairman Yoder said. “At the same time, we’re making sure to provide the US Capitol Police with the resources they need to meet their mission in today's increasingly polarized climate. We provide the necessary resources to enhance security at our constituent events in House districts across the country.”

In addition to Yoder’s provisions, the Make America Secure Appropriations Act includes these other security priorities:

  • Largest military pay raise in eight years.
     
  • Largest level of funding for the Department of Veterans Affairs in history.
  • Substantial funding increase for the Department of Defense to rebuild our military after nearly a quarter of its budget had been cut over the last eight years.
  • Funding for updated equipment and weapons so our military is prepared for the threats of modern warfare and defense.
  • Funding for improved military infrastructure.
  • Increased funding for the Department of Energy’s nuclear weapons program.
  • Authorization for the EPA to withdraw from the Obama Administration’s disastrous WOTUS Rule.
  • Full funding to meet President Trump’s request for a wall along our southern border.

###

Read More

Loading legislation ... one moment please
Loading votes ... one moment please

Rep. Yoder Urges Passage of Make America Secure and Prosperous Appropriations Act

2017-09-08 18:10:43


Rep. Yoder Supports Bob Dole Congressional Gold Medal Act

2017-09-05 23:00:29


KMBC Reports on Rep. Yoder's Visit to Stonelock in Olathe

2017-08-03 15:46:22


Rep. Yoder Pushes Reforms to America's Legal Immigration System

2017-07-27 17:47:25


Rep. Yoder Urges Passage of Security Funding Bill

2017-07-26 21:08:11


Rep. Yoder Congratulates Erin Smith of Shawnee Mission West

2017-07-11 19:40:15


Rep. Yoder Legislative Update

2017-06-30 21:20:31


Rep. Yoder Urges Passage of Kate's Law on House Floor

2017-06-29 21:10:58


Rep. Yoder Honors Grandma Edna on House Floor

2017-06-28 20:23:40


Rep. Yoder Recognizes Alzheimer's Month on House Floor

2017-06-21 18:08:30


Reps. Yoder & Cleaver Promote Civility on 41 Action News

2017-06-19 14:55:43


41 Action News Covers the Congressional Baseball Game

2017-06-16 17:29:45


Rep. Yoder Floor Speech on VA Accountability Act

2017-06-13 17:28:20


Rep. Yoder's Floor Remarks on Financial CHOICE Act

2017-06-08 17:20:27


Rep. Yoder Discusses Need for Unified Strategy to Defeat ISIS

2017-06-08 15:00:56


Rep. Yoder on Supporting Veterans Legislation to Honor Memorial Day

2017-05-23 19:53:53


Rep. Yoder Commemorates National Police Week 2017

2017-05-22 14:49:18


Chairman Yoder's Remarks on 2017 Omnibus Funding Bill

2017-05-03 21:01:39


Rep. Yoder Commemorates the Life of His Grandmother Edna Yoder

2017-04-12 19:38:52


Rep. Yoder Thanks First Responders for Efforts on Overland Park Fire

2017-03-22 18:46:58


Contact Information

215 Cannon HOB
Washington, DC 20515
Phone 202-225-2865
Fax 202-225-2807
yoder.house.gov

Kevin is a 5th generation Kansan who grew up on a grain and livestock farm in rural Kansas near a town called Yoder. It was on the farm where Kevin learned the true value of hard work and where he saw first-hand the ingenuity and prairie spirit that makes Kansas such a special place.

On January 5, 2011, Representative Yoder was sworn in to serve his first term as a Member of the 112th Congress.  Representative Yoder was selected as one of only three freshmen to serve on the House Appropriations Committee, the committee responsible for allocating federal spending.
He began his second term in the House of Representatives in January 2013. For the 113th Congress, Representative Yoder returned to the House Appropriations Committee. He serves as Vice Chairman as a member of the Agriculture Subcomittee; and sits on the State and Foreign Operations Subcommittee and the Financial Services Subcommittee as well. Congressman Yoder is focused on balancing the federal budget, reducing the national debt and supporting policies that help private sector job growth.
During his time in Congress, Representative Yoder has received several accolades and awards for his voting record and support of various issues; including recognition as the 2012 Head Start Kansas State Children’s Champion Award; a National Federation of Independent Businesses (NFIB) Guardian of Small Business; the U.S. Chamber of Commerce “Spirit of Enterprise” award; and the National Association of Manufacturers (NAM) Award for Legislative Excellence. Additionally, Representative Yoder and Representative Emanuel Cleaver II (D-MO) jointly were included in the inaugural class to receive the 2012 Consensus Civility Award.
Representative Yoder was appointed by Speaker of the House John Boehner to serve on the Gallaudet University Board of Trustees. Gallaudet University, located in Washington, DC, is the world’s only liberal arts university for the Deaf community and hard of hearing.
Prior to being elected to Congress, Representative Yoder served as a State Representative in the Kansas Legislature where he represented Leawood and Overland Park. Representative Yoder chaired the House Appropriations Committee where he led the effort to cut spending, balance the Kansas state budget, and oppose tax increases.
The 3rd Congressional District of Kansas includes Johnson County, Wyandotte County and the northeast corner of Miami County. Congressman Yoder is a proud graduate of the University of Kansas where he received degrees in political science, English, and law. He lives in Overland Park with his wife, Brooke. On November 7, 2013, Rep. Yoder and Brooke announced the birth of their first child, a baby daughter named Caroline Lucille.

Serving With

Roger Marshall

KANSAS' 1st DISTRICT

Lynn Jenkins

KANSAS' 2nd DISTRICT

Recent Videos