Donald Young

Donald Young

ALASKA

Congressman Young Supports Five Year Reauthorization for Farm Bill

2018/12/12

Today, the U.S. House of Representatives passed H.R. 2, the Agriculture Improvement Act of 2018 also referred to as the Farm Bill. With many important Alaska provisions included, Alaska Congressman Don Young issued the following statement after its passage:

“This legislation is important for Alaskans because there are many provisions, which I fought for, that will support communities of all sizes across the state,” said Congressman Young. “We know that food insecurity is a reality for many Alaskans and this year’s Farm Bill prioritizes money to address this issue for both rural and urban areas. I’m pleased that this five year investment will also support water and sewer systems for rural and Alaska Native villages as well as rural broadband grants. While changes were made to this bill, there are many important programs that will help the future of Alaska.”

Alaska Specific Victories

  • Traditional Foods – Includes expanded liability protections for entities and organizations that serve traditional foods, based on an amendment Congressman Young offered earlier this year.
  • Rural Alaska Village Grant Program – Authorizes $30 million to develop better drinking water and sanitation facilities in rural Alaska.
  • Education Grants to Alaska Native Serving Institutions – Authorizes $10 million to help the institutions to increase their self-sufficiency and capacity to serve students.
  • Micro-Grants for Food Security – Authorizes $4 million to be directed to Alaska to increase locally grown food in food insecure communities.
  • Rural Water and Wastewater Circuit RiderProgram – Authorizes $25 million to provide technical assistance to rural water systems experiencing operations, financial, or managerial issues.
  • Buy American – Prioritizes the purchase of American caught fish for the National School Lunch Program.  Alaska continues to lead the country in the amount of fish commercially caught.
  • Commercial Hemp Legalization – Allows for the cultivation of hemp in manufacturing, medical and other industries which will be helpful to Alaska’s economy.

H.R. 2 passed the House by a vote of 369 - 47 and will now go to President Trump for final approval. H.R. 2 reauthorizes farm and nutrition assistance programs for five years (through 2023), all within a budget-neutral framework. This includes major programs for income support, food and nutrition, land conservation, trade promotion, rural development, research, forestry, horticulture, and other programs administered by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA).

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Young Supports Land Transfer for Southeast Alaska

2018/12/11

Today, the U.S. House of Representatives approved S. 825, the Southeast Alaska Regional Health Consortium Land Transfer Act. Alaska Congressman Don Young spoke in support of the legislation on the House Floor.

“The Consortium provides comprehensive healthcare to Native communities throughout Alaska’s panhandle.  It also delivers healthcare on behalf of the federal government through self-determination compacting,” said Congressman Young. “The Consortium operates Mount Edgecumbe Hospital in Sitka, a 25 bed critical access facility. The hospital was constructed towards the end of World War II and is in dire need of updates due to its age and condition.  This legislation will transfer 19 acres of federal land to the Consortium which will allow for necessary updates and improvements in healthcare services for Alaska Natives. This is crucially important for Southeast Alaska and I urge my colleagues for their support.”


Watch Congressman Young’s remarks here.

S. 825 passed the House by a vote of 403-3 and will now go to the President’s desk for final approval. In April of 2017, Congressman Young introduced H.R. 1901 which is the House companion to S. 825. This bill directs the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) to convey to the Southeast Alaska Regional Health Consortium in Sitka, Alaska, all U.S. interest in 19 acres in Sitka for use in connection with health and social services programs.

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Tribal Energy Legislation Goes to President’s Desk

2018/12/10

Today, Alaska Congressman Don Young helped pass S. 245 out of the U.S. House of Representatives. S. 245, the Indian Tribal Energy Development and Self-Determination Act passed the House by unanimous consent and will now go to the President’s desk for final approval. Congressman Young spoke in support of this legislation today on the House Floor:

“Promoting energy projects is critical for economic development throughout Indian Country. Native communities face a significant number of obstacles to developing and delivering energy on their land,” said Congressman Young. “I have always said that Alaska Natives and American Indians are the best caretakers of their lands. Tribal self-determination is all about empowering Native communities with the tools and authority to manage their resources, which this legislation will promote. I am particularly pleased that the bill includes a tribal biomass demonstration program, which mirrors a provision in my Native American Energy Act. I appreciate Chairman Hoeven’s willingness to continue working on Indian energy and his commitment to hold a hearing on my Native American Energy Act next Congress, and I thank him for his leadership on this issue. With the President’s signature on S.245, Native communities across the country are one step closer to energy independence.”


Watch Congressman Young speak in support of S. 245 on the House Floorhere.
To download Congressman Young's remarks, click here.

“This legislation empowers Tribes to manage their own energy resources, cuts red tape, drives economic growth and promotes energy development for Indian Country. It streamlines the process for Tribes to enter into Tribal Energy Resource Agreements (TERAs) with the Department of the Interior (DOI),” said Senate Committee on Indian Affairs Chairman Senator John Hoeven (R-ND). “TERAs facilitate more tribal control by authorizing tribal contracts, leases, and rights-of-ways for energy development without unnecessary, cumbersome federal bureaucracy. The bill will help level the playing field for Tribes so that they can participate, if they choose, in the booming energy market. We appreciate Congressman Don Young’s (R-AK-AL) leadership on this issue in the House and look forward to continuing to work together in the next Congress to incorporate his ideas for energy independence for Native communities. This bill was first introduced during the 112th Congress, and these improvements are long overdue. I look forward to the President signing this bill into law.”

In January 2017, Congressman Young introduced H.R. 210, the Native American Energy Act to empower Native American communities in their energy independence efforts. S. 245 has many similar provisions and some of the notable ones include:

  • Directing the Department of the Interior (DOI) to provide Indian tribes with technical assistance in planning their energy resource development programs.
  • Expanding the Department of Energy (DOE) Indian energy education planning and management assistance program.
  • Amending the Federal Power Act to require the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to give Tribes, in addition to states and municipalities, preference for the receipt of preliminary hydroelectric licenses.
  • Creating at least four new biomass projects to be implemented for Tribes and Alaska Native Corporations, in order to promote biomass energy production.

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Congressman Young Sends Two Bills to the President’s Desk

2018/12/06

Today, with Senate approval two of Alaska Congressman Don Young’s bills are going to the President’s desk for signature. Congressman Young introduced H.R. 1417, the National Law Enforcement Museum Exhibits Act, and H.R. 3398, the REAL ID Act Modification for Freely Associated States Act, during the 115th Congress.

“These are two unique bills which address different needs. I’m glad to see my colleagues in both the House and the Senate approved these measures,” said Congressman Young. “When Congress can pass meaningful legislation that solves real concerns, I believe that is a good sign. These two pieces of legislation will help do just that and I thank my colleagues for their support.”

“On behalf of the Federated States of Micronesia (FSM) citizens living in the United States of America, I extend to the sponsors and supporters of the REAL ID modification bill in both the House and the Senate our sincere appreciation and warm thank you," said Ambassador of the Federated States of Micronesia to the United StatesAkillino Harris Susaia. "Your steadfast support enabled the passage of this bill which will make life much easier for our citizens to obtain state identification documents and drivers licenses.”

H.R. 3398 passed out of the House on September 26, 2018 and H.R. 1417 passed out of the House on May 15, 2018, both by unanimous consent.

Background:

H.R. 3398, the REAL ID Act Modification for Freely Associated States Act, amends the Real ID Act of 2005. When Congress passed the REAL ID Act in 2005, no reference was made to the Freely Associated States, the Federated States of Micronesia, Republic of the Marshall Islands and Republic of Palau (FAS) as among those classes having “lawful status” for the purpose of the Act. Instead, reference was made in the definition of “State” to the “Trust Territories of the Pacific Islands” (TTPI), an entity that has not existed since 1994. While that reference served no operative purpose, it did show Congressional intent to include FAS citizens under the Act. This legislation aims to solve that issue. The REAL ID Act Modification for Freely Associated States Act would amend Real ID Act of 2005 to permit Freely Associated States (FAS) to meet identification requirements under such Act.

H.R. 1417, the National Law Enforcement Museum Exhibits Act amends the National Law Museum Enforcement Act to allow the National Law Enforcement Museum (NLEM) to acquire, possess, collect, ship, transport, import, and display firearms only for use in the NLEM. In 2000, Congress passed the National Law Enforcement Museum Act of 2000 to establish the NLEM. The Museum was established to honor and commemorate the service and sacrifice of law enforcement officers in the United States which opened in Fall 2018. The NLEM showcases interactive exhibits to allow visitors to experience the life of law enforcement officers. Under current law, the NLEM is limited in the types of firearms it can acquire, possess, collect, ship, transport, import or display.

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ICYMI: Congressman Young Joins President Trump for Coast Guard Authorization Bill Signing

2018/12/06

Earlier this week Alaska Congressman Don Young joined President Donald Trump in the Oval Office as he signed S. 140, the Frank LoBiondo Coast Guard Authorization Act of 2018, into law.


President Donald J. Trump signs S.140 The Frank LoBiondo Coast Guard Authorization Act of 2018 Tuesday, Dec. 4, 2018, in the Oval Office of the White House.(Official White House Photo by Joyce N. Boghosian)

“I’m proud to see President Trump sign this legislation into law,” said Congressman Young. “The Coast Guard has an important presence in Alaska and these brave men and women answer the call to service at a moment’s notice. With this bill now law, the Coast Guard will have the support they need to continue their work defending our waters and for future missions.”


President Donald J. Trump signs S.140 The Frank LoBiondo Coast Guard Authorization Act of 2018 Tuesday, Dec. 4, 2018, in the Oval Office of the White House.(Official White House Photo by Joyce N. Boghosian)

Provisions Congressman Young Secured:

  • Vessel Incidental Discharge Act (VIDA) – After nearly 15 years of work, there will be a national standard for regulation of ballast water and other incidental discharges while also providing permanent exemption for commercial fishing vessels and commercial vessels under 75 feet from needing to obtain burdensome permits through the Environmental Protection Agency.
  • Reauthorization of the Hydrographic Services Improvement Act which will improve hydrographic surveying, especially of the Arctic. Additionally, this will assist in the construction of a new homeport for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) research vessel Fairweather in Ketchikan. 
  • A fishery endorsement for the vessel Western Challenger to correct an issue from a previous Coast Guard Authorization.

Provisions of Interest for Alaska:

  • Allows for more localized decision making in Alaskan waters by the Coast Guard in the approval of oil spill response plans and requires the Coast Guard to verify the effectiveness of the alternate plans. The legislation also requires oil spill removal organizations identified in the vessel response plans to conduct regular drills using their response resources.
  • Directs the Coast Guard to conduct an enhanced maintenance project to extend the service life of the Polar Star icebreaker until the end of 2025.
  • Authorizes Coast Guard use of multi-year contracts to begin procurement of three new National Security Cutters.
  • Facilitates a land exchange on Kodiak Island to protect wildlife as well as open possibilities for economic development.
  • Requires a report by the Coast Guard, in consultation with DoD, on progress toward implementing strategic objectives described in the United States Coast Guard Arctic Strategy from 2013.

The Frank LoBiondo Coast Guard Authorization Act of 2018 is bipartisan, bicameral legislation to reauthorize, strengthen, and support the United States Coast Guard in its critical missions to save lives, safeguard our shores, protect living marine resources, and help ensure a 21st century maritime transportation system for America. The bill also reauthorizes the Federal Maritime Commission (FMC) and makes updates to the FMC’s authorities to better protect the U.S. maritime industry.

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Alaska Delegation Working to Support Alaskans in Earthquake Recovery Efforts

2018/11/30

WASHINGTON, D.C. – U.S. Sens. Lisa Murkowski, Dan Sullivan, and Rep. Don Young, all R-Alaska, today issued the following statements after receiving a briefing from Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Administrator Brock Long on the 7.0 earthquake which struck near Anchorage, Alaska Friday morning, causing extensive damage to infrastructure, such as roads and bridges.

“This natural disaster has been devastating for thousands of Alaskans, however, I am encouraged by the immediate response from FEMA, this Administration and our state officials,” said Congressman Young. “This earthquake represents one of the many challenges we face in Alaska but we can always rebuild and we are starting that process now. I want to thank all of the people who have reached out. My heart goes out to all of the Alaskans that are dealing with the aftermath. In this delegation, we all have family back in Alaska and we are grateful for their safety. We will continue to work together as a team to ensure federal assistance is available for Alaskans.”

“It’s been mere hours since this devastating earthquake took place in Alaska, but the delegation is very engaged with the situation. We are in the very initial stages of understanding the extent, but we know there has been significant damage to homes, roads, infrastructure, and schools. The impact is very real and will require a great deal of recovery and effort, but I have been assured that Alaskans will have what they need to deal with and recover from this very serious earthquake,” said Senator Lisa Murkowski. “Alaskans are incredibly resilient but that doesn’t mean that when you’re hit with something of this intensity it doesn’t have a substantial and devastating impact. The message I want to convey to friends, family, and Alaskans across the state is that we are on top of this. It’s important to me that Alaskans know that even though they are 4,000 miles away from our nation’s capital-- we have all eyes on them and we are preparing mightily to address this disaster.”

“As Alaskans, we are resilient and there is no question in my mind we will come out of this natural disaster as a stronger, more resolute people,” said Senator Sullivan. “The damage on the ground, particularly to our transportation infrastructure, is significant and we’ve already begun the process to ensure Alaskans receive the full and unwavering support of the federal government. We have already received serious commitments from the leadership of the federal government – the President, Vice President, the FEMA Administrator, Secretary of Transportation and on down the line. As Alaskans begin the long road to recovery, we are focused on making sure every element of federal power, authority and funding is brought to bear on getting Alaska back up and running as soon as possible.”


(Click image to watch video of Alaska Delegation press conference)

(Click here for photos)

The Alaska Congressional Delegation this afternoon spoke with Governor Bill Walker and local authorities on the ground responding to the natural disaster. They also spoke with Vice President Mike Pence, who offered his concern, prayers, and the administration’s support. In addition, the Delegation also spoke with Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao who provided updates on highways and the Ted Stevens International Airport and assured the Delegation that the Transportation Department was mobilizing personnel and ready to assist.

Federal Response: FEMA has committed to provide whatever assistance the State of Alaska may require in response and recovery to the earthquake. FEMA currently has personnel on the ground in the State Emergency Operations Center at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson (JBER) and has dispatched Deputy Administrator Peter Gaynor from Washington, DC along with Regional Administrator Mike O’Hare from Bothell, Washington to determine federal assistance requirements. Issuance of a federal emergency declaration by President Trump, at the request of the Governor, is the first step in opening the flow of federal relief money to Alaska. Following damage assessment, this could be upgraded to a federal major disaster declaration which would make additional federal funds available to the state. FEMA has also offered to make high level Federal Incident Management teams available to Alaska, if required.

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Young Supports Coast Guard Authorization Legislation

2018/11/27

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Today, the U.S. House of Representatives voted on S. 140, the Frank LoBiondo Coast Guard Authorization Act of 2018 and with Alaska Congressman Don Young’s support, the bill will now go to the President’s desk for signature.

“The Coast Guard is a crucial branch of our military that protects and defends our waters and borders which we see in Alaska every day,” said Congressman Young. “The focus of this legislation is to improve how the Coast Guard operates nationwide and in Alaska this is especially important for Arctic operations and maritime commerce in our region. As a member of the Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, I was able to secure several provisions that will directly support the Coast Guard in Alaska as well as reducing regulatory burdens on both recreational boaters and fishing vessels. I’m proud of the tremendous work the brave men and women of the Coast Guard accomplish for this country and with the passage of this bill, I believe they will be better equipped for their future missions.”

Provisions Congressman Young Secured:

  • Vessel Incidental Discharge Act (VIDA) – After nearly 15 years of work, there will be a national standard for regulation of ballast water and other incidental discharges while also providing permanent exemption for commercial fishing vessels and commercial vessels under 75 feet from needing to obtain burdensome permits through the Environmental Protection Agency.
  • Reauthorization of the Hydrographic Services Improvement Act which will improve hydrographic surveying, especially of the Arctic. Additionally, this will assist in the construction of a new homeport for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) research vessel Fairweather in Ketchikan. 
  • A fishery endorsement for the vessel Western Challenger to correct an issue from a previous Coast Guard Authorization.

Provisions of Interest for Alaska:

  • Allows for more localized decision making in Alaskan waters by the Coast Guard in the approval of oil spill response plans and requires the Coast Guard verify the effectiveness of the alternate plans. The legislation also requires oil spill removal organizations identified in the vessel response plans conduct regular drills using their response resources.
  • Directs the Coast Guard to conduct an enhanced maintenance project to extend the service life of the Polar Star icebreaker until the end of 2025.
  • Authorizes Coast Guard use of multi-year contracts to begin procurement of three new National Security Cutters.
  • Facilitates a land exchange on Kodiak Island to protect wildlife as well as open possibilities for economic development.
  • Requires a report by the Coast Guard, in consultation with DoD, on progress toward implementing strategic objectives described in the United States Coast Guard Arctic Strategy from 2013.

The Frank LoBiondo Coast Guard Authorization Act of 2018 is bipartisan, bicameral legislation to reauthorize, strengthen, and support the United States Coast Guard in its critical missions to save lives, safeguard our shores, protect living marine resources, and help ensure a 21st century maritime transportation system for America. The bill also reauthorizes the Federal Maritime Commission (FMC) and makes updates to the FMC’s authorities to better protect the U.S. maritime industry.

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Bill Sponsored by Sullivan and Whitehouse, Championed by Young, Bonamici Signed Into Law

2018/10/11

Today, President Trump signed S. 3508, The Save Our Seas Act, into law which will assist local communities and states in removing garbage and debris from our oceans and shores. House Oceans Caucus Co-Chairs Congresswoman Suzanne Bonamici (D-OR) and Congressman Don Young (R-AK) introduced the House companion bill, H.R. 2748, last year.

“Alaskans know, better than most, how marine debris can impact our oceans and coastlines,” said Congressman Don Young. “I was proud to work with my Oceans Caucus colleagues, particularly my co-chair Suzanne Bonamici, to pass this critical legislation out of the House. This bill will allow NOAA and the Coast Guard to address the creation and cleanup of marine debris, and will give the U.S. tools to work with foreign allies to ensure they have the necessary tools to end this crisis. I am very pleased to see this legislation signed into law, and I appreciate my colleagues in the House who passed this bill with unanimous consent.”

“The ocean is resilient and we can help it heal, but we cannot continue to ignore the garbage polluting our oceans and shores,” said Congresswoman Suzanne Bonamici. “More than eight million tons of plastic are dumped into our oceans each year, harming our coastal economies, endangering marine life, destroying important marine habitat, propagating invasive species, and creating hazardous conditions for the maritime industry. I was proud to work with my fellow House Oceans Caucus Co-Chair Don Young on this bipartisan bill to assist local communities and states in preventing and responding to marine debris events. Marine debris is entirely preventable and establishing this law is an important step in protecting the health of our oceans.”

The Save Our Seas Act reauthorizes the NOAA Marine Debris Program through Fiscal Year 2022 and provides resources to help states respond to severe marine debris events. The bill allows the NOAA Administrator, in coordination with relevant Governors, to declare severe marine debris events, authorize funding to assist with cleanup and response, and encourage international engagement to address the growing effects of marine debris.

Both Representative Bonamici and Young spoke on the House floor to encourage their colleagues to support final passage. You can download video footage of Bonamici speaking here, and Young speaking here.

Healthy beaches and waterways are critical to the marine ecosystems that drive the economy in coastal communities. More than 3 million jobs in the U.S. rely on our oceans, contributing at least $352 billion in economic activity annually.

The House Oceans Caucus is a bipartisan group of House members committed to taking action to protect the health and future of our oceans. In addition to marine debris, the Caucus focuses on efforts to address ocean acidification, illegal, unreported, and unregulated fishing, and weather and natural disaster hazards that threaten coastal communities and wildlife. 

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Alaska Delegation Sends Joint Letter to State Department on Transboundary Mining Activity

2018/10/09

The Alaska Delegation recently joined together to urge the Secretary of State to discuss the risks posed by transboundary mining activity during upcoming bilateral meetings between the United States and Canada. Senators Lisa Murkowski, Dan Sullivan, Congressman Don Young, Governor Bill Walker, and Lieutenant Governor Byron Mallott sent a letter to Secretary of State Mike Pompeo expressing Alaska’s priorities for strong and continued engagement between the State Department and the Canadian Government on the management of mining activity affecting Alaska and British Columbia’s transboundary waters.

 “We write to express our appreciation for the Administration’s preliminary efforts to protect American interests in the face of potential environmental harm from large-scale hard rock mines in Canada that lack fundamental international oversight,” said the Alaska Delegation. “These Canadian mining projects are located near transboundary rivers that flow from British Columbia into four U.S. states, including Alaska, and, if managed poorly, pose a threat to Southeast Alaska’s flourishing commercial fishing and tourism industries.”

In November 2017 the Alaska Delegation sent a letter to then-Secretary Rex Tillerson urging the State Department to prioritize transboundary watersheds, bringing this important issue to the Cabinet level. That letter has been followed by sustained efforts on behalf of the Delegations to engage with their Canadian counterparts and work towards accountability for mining projects that may affect transboundary watersheds. Specifically, the Alaska Delegation has repeatedly stressed the need for binding protections, joint water quality monitoring, and financial assurances to ensure mine operators in British Columbia will be held accountable for any impacts to transboundary water quality that might threaten Alaskan livelihoods or subsistence.

“It is clear that this Administration takes the issue of transboundary watersheds very seriously. We therefore urge the Administration, through your Department, to deliver a strong message in defense of American interests at the next U.S. – Canada bilateral meetings in Ottawa in October 2018. We specifically request that the Department’s representatives impress upon their Canadian counterparts the critical need for binding protections, joint water quality monitoring, and financial assurances to protect Americans downstream of large-scale Canadian mines, as outlined in our 2017 letter,” the Delegation wrote. “We appreciate the Administration’s efforts to date. American resources, communities, and industries must not be harmed by developments upstream in British Columbia.

In the Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies Appropriations package for Fiscal Year 2019, currently being negotiated by a House-Senate conference committee, Senator Lisa Murkowski included $1.5 million in the Senate version for stream gauges to monitor water quality on transboundary rivers, a $1 million increase from fiscal year 2017 funding levels, and directed the U.S. Geological Survey to enter into a formal partnership with local tribes and other agencies to help develop a water quality strategy for transboundary rivers.

In February 2018, Senator Sullivan and Lt. Governor Mallott traveled to Ottawa, Canada, to meet with senior officials in the Canadian government to discuss the transboundary mining issues impacting Southeast Alaska. In August 2018, they followed up with a letter to the Minister of Environment Catherine McKenna and Minister of International Trade James Carr, thanking the Canadians for their attention to transboundary mining issues, while continuing to stress several key areas of concern that require attention.

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Alaska Legal Services Corporation Receives $169,879 Technology Grant from the Legal Services Corporation

2018/10/04

The Legal Services Corporation (LSC) announced today that Alaska Legal Services Corporation will receive a $169,879 Technology Initiative Grant to enhance communication with individuals seeking civil legal assistance online. Established in 2000, LSC’s Technology Initiative Grants program supports legal aid organizations in developing and replicating technologies that improve efficiency and provide greater access to high-quality legal assistance. 

“LSC’s Technology Initiative Grants increase access to justice for low-income people with critical civil legal needs,” said LSC President Jim Sandman. “These technology projects improve the delivery of legal services and make a difference to the millions of Americans who would otherwise have to navigate the legal system alone.”

Alaska Congressman Don Young applauded the grant: “I am pleased that the Alaska Legal Services Corporation (ALSC) has been selected to receive the Technology Initiative Grant which will help update and enhance their electronic referrals system. This critical investment will serve those in need of civil legal assistance and ensure ALSC can carry out their mission to support Alaskans as they navigate the legal system.”

Alaska Legal Services Corporation will use its grant to enhance the electronic client referrals system for states piloting Legal Navigator portals—an initiative launched by LSC, Microsoft, and Pro Bono Net to direct individuals with civil legal needs to the most appropriate forms of assistance. With the support of this grant, project teams with Alaska Legal Services and the Legal Aid Society of Hawaii will work to simplify the process through which people seeking legal information access civil legal assistance online. 

Alaska Legal Services Corporation is one of 24 recipients of 2018 Technology Initiative Grant funding totaling more than $3 million.

Legal Services Corporation (LSC) is an independent nonprofit established by Congress in 1974 to provide financial support for civil legal aid to low-income Americans. The Corporation currently provides funding to 133 independent nonprofit legal aid programs in every state, the District of Columbia, and U.S. territories.

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2011/04/14

Meeting with Sebastian Donoso, Special Advisor on Indigenous Affairs within the Government of Chile Read More

2011/04/14

Meeting with Benjamin Tucker of the Yakima Nation Read More

2011/04/13

Meeting with 33 Close-Up students from Chugiak High School, East High School, Stellar High School, South Anchorage High School and Yukon Koyukuk Scools Read More

2011/04/13

Meeting with Jackie Johnson, Executive Director of the National Congress of American Indians Read More

2011/04/13

Meeting with John Katz of the Alaska Governor's Office Read More

2011/04/13

House Committee on Energy and Commerce hearing on "American Energy Initiative" with both Senators testifying Read More

2011/04/12

Meeting with Haines Borough Mayor Jan Hill Read More

2011/04/12

Meeting with Dalton Riser, Student Wasilla Read More

2011/04/12

Meeting with Mallory Givens, UAA Student Read More

2011/04/06

Meeting with Sheri Buretta, Ed Herndon and Trudi Komakhuk Read More

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SEARHC Land Transfer Legislation

2018-12-11 19:57:47


Congressman Young Speaks in Support of Tribal Energy Development Legislation

2018-12-10 23:43:09


Congressman Young Speaks in Support of "Save Our Seas Act" on the House FLoor

2018-07-25 21:50:40


Congressman Don Young visits with C-SPAN for "Alaska Weekend" Program

2018-07-25 17:31:16


Congressman Young offers Placer Mining Amendment to FY19 Interior Appropriations Bill

2018-07-19 17:12:01


Congressman Young offers Amendment to FY19 Financial Services Bill

2018-07-19 16:34:18


Congressman Young Speaks in Support of POWER Act

2018-07-17 22:47:32


H.R. 200 Opening Floor Remarks

2018-07-11 22:18:15


Congressman Young Passes "Save Our Seas Act" out of House Transportation & Infrastructure Committee

2018-06-27 17:06:46


Congressman Young Passes HR 221 to Improve Hydrographic Surveying

2018-06-25 22:50:40


Congressman Young Secures Amendment to 2018 Water Resources Development Act of 2018

2018-06-07 01:20:24


The Legacy of Sadako

2018-05-30 20:23:05


Congressman Young supports FY19 NDAA

2018-05-24 21:40:28


Congressman Young offers Traditional Foods Amendment to 2018 Farm Bill

2018-05-17 23:06:03


Congressman Young offers amendment to 2018 Farm Bill

2018-05-17 19:57:38


Congressman Don Young Speaks in Support of H.R. 1417, National Law Enforcement Museum Exhibits Act

2018-05-15 22:40:33


Congressman Young Speaks in Support of the 2018 FAA Reauthorization Bill

2018-04-27 01:28:20


Congressman Don Young Speaks to H.R. 4069 at House Natural Resources Committee

2018-04-18 16:46:21


Congressman Young attends Transportation & Infrastructure Subcommittee on Highways and Transit

2018-03-07 22:17:34


Congressman Young returns home to Alaska

2018-02-28 18:19:45


Contact Information

2314 Rayburn HOB
Washington, DC 20515
Phone 202-225-5765
Fax 202-225-0425
donyoung.house.gov

Congressman Don Young was re-elected to the 113th Congress in 2012 to serve his 21st term as Alaska’s only Representative to the United States House of Representatives. First sworn in as a freshman to the 93rd Congress after winning a special election on March 6, 1973, Congressman Young is today the 1st ranking Republican member and the the 4th ranking overall member of the House of Representatives.

Congressman Young served as Chairman of the House Resources Committee from 1995 to 2001 and then as the Chairman of the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee from 2001-2007. In the 110th Congress, Representative Young returned to the helm of the Resources Committee to lead his fellow Republicans as the Ranking Member. In the 112th Congress, he was chosen to serve as the Chairman for the Subcommittee on Alaska Native and Indian Affairs.  Rep. Young currently serves as a senior Republican on the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee and House Natural Resources Committee.

Congressman Young calls Fort Yukon, Alaska home; a remote village of approximately 700 people located 7 miles above the Arctic Circle in Alaska’s central interior region. Born on June 9, 1933 in Meridian, California, he earned his associate degree at Yuba Junior College in 1952, and his bachelor’s degree in teaching at Chico State College in 1958. Between earning these degrees, he served in the US Army’s 41st Tank Battalion from 1955 to 1957.

When he first moved to Alaska, Congressman Young made a living in construction and tried his hand at commercial fishing, trapping, and in the search for gold. In Fort Yukon he taught in a 25-student, 5th grade elementary class in the Bureau of Indian Affairs school. Constructed of logs, the school had a wood stove that kept his Alaska Native students warm in the sub-freezing, arctic winter. With the annual spring break-up of the river ice, he captained his own tug and barge operation to deliver products and supplies to villages along the Yukon River. Even today, he remains the only licensed mariner in Congress.

It was in Fort Yukon that Rep. Young met and married a young bookkeeper named Lu. Lu was always at the Congressman’s side and supported him throughout his public service career. Lu and Don were married for 46 years, they were blessed with and raised two daughters, Joni and Dawn, and 14 grandchildren. Mrs. Young passed away on August 2, 2009.

Congressman Young first entered public service in 1964 when he was elected Mayor of Fort Yukon. Two years later, Alaskan voters elected him to the State Legislature in Juneau where he served in the State House from 1966 to 1970, and later in the State Senate from 1970 to 1973. Just hours after being sworn in to United States House of Representatives in 1973, he found himself leading the historic battle for approval of the Trans-Alaskan Pipeline. Often citing this as the single most important achievement in his career, Congressman Young stated, “Next to statehood itself, the most historical legislation passed that affected every Alaskan then, now, and in the future, was the passage of the pipeline legislation.”

That same year, his colleagues honored him as the “Freshman Congressman of the Year.” He went on to gain a key appointment on the then Merchant Marine and Fisheries Committee where he pushed through the 200-mile fishing limit critical to Alaska’s fishing industry. He fought against federal control of lands and resources to which Alaskans are rightfully entitled – a battle he continues today with the same vigor. In 1997, he passed by a 419-1 vote, the National Wildlife Improvement Act, which sets guidelines for the nation’s 500-plus wildlife refuges.

Congressman Young proudly serves as the “Congressman for All Alaska” and loves his role as the only Alaskan Representative in Congress. Renewed by the challenges and goals of the 111th Congress and his committee positions, Congressman Young will continue to champion legislation and funding for programs benefiting Alaska and the nation. His vision remains the same – to provide citizens with the opportunity for a better life not just for today, but also for tomorrow and the future.


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