Science, Space, and Technology

Committee on Science, Space, and Technology

Lamar Smith

Subcommittee on Research and Technology Hearing - A Review of Sexual Harassment and Misconduct in Science

2018/02/27

Hearing charter Witnesses: Ms. Rhonda Davis, head, Office of Diversity and Inclusion, National Science Foundation Dr. Kathryn Clancy, associate professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Illinois Ms. Christine McEntee, executive director, American Geophysical Union Ms. Kristina Larsen, attorney, Law Office of Kristina K. Larsen Read More

Smith Statement on the Second Meeting of the National Space Council

2018/02/21

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. – U.S. House Science, Space, and Technology Committee Chairman Lamar Smith (R-Texas) released the following statement after today’s National Space Council meeting, “Moon, Mars, and Worlds Beyond: Winning the Next Frontier.” Chairman Smith: “The American space enterprise is full of potential. At Kennedy Space Center today, we discussed the importance of space exploration and easing the burden on our commercial space partners. The American Space Commerce Free Enterprise Act, passed by the Science Committee last June, implements these goals by creating an innovative, transparent and streamlined structure for authorizing and supervising space activity. With this legislation, we commit to complying with our international obligations, reforming our commercial remote sensing system, and welcoming new space operators. “We are prioritizing exploration. We are streamlining our regulatory process. And we are looking forward to achieving and surpassing the exploration goals we set today. It is an honor to be at Kennedy Space Center with Vice President Pence, and I look forward to working with him to ensure America wins the next frontier.” Read More

Subcommittee on Research and Technology Hearing - Mentoring, Training, and Apprenticeships for STEM Education and Careers

2018/02/15

Hearing charter Opening Statements: Full Committee Chairman Lamar Smith (R-Texas) Research and Technology Subcommittee Chairwoman Barbara Comstock (R-Va.) Witnesses: Dr. Victor R. McCrary, vice president, Division of Research and Economic Development, Morgan State University; member and chair, Task Force on the Skilled Technical Workforce, National Science Board [Truth in Testimony] Dr. John Sands, department chair, Computer Integrated Technologies, Moraine Valley Community College; director and principal investigator, Center for Systems Security and Information Assurance [Truth in Testimony] Mr. Montez King, executive director, National Institute of Metalworking Skills [Truth in Testimony] Dr. John Bardo, president, Wichita State University [Truth in Testimony] Read More

Subcommittee on Oversight and Subcommittee on Research and Technology Hearing: Beyond Bitcoin: Emerging Applications for Blockchain Technology

2018/02/14

Hearing charter Opening Statements: Oversight Subcommittee Chairman Ralph Abraham (R-La.) Research and Technology Chairwoman Barbara Comstock (R-Va.) Witnesses: Mr. Chris A. Jaikaran, analyst in cybersecurity policy, Government and Finance Division, Congressional Research Service [Truth in Testimony] Dr. Charles H. Romine, director, Information Technology Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology [Truth in Testimony] Mr. Gennaro “Jerry” Cuomo, IBM fellow and vice president of blockchain technologies, IBM Cloud [Truth in Testimony] Mr. Frank Yiannas, vice president of food safety, Walmart Inc. [Truth in Testimony] Mr. Aaron Wright, associate clinical professor and co-director of the Blockchain Project, Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law [Truth in Testimony]   Read More

House Unanimously Approves Building Blocks of STEM Act

2018/02/13

WASHINGTON – The U.S. House of Representatives today approved the Building Blocks of STEM Act (H.R. 3397), sponsored by Rep. Jacky Rosen (D-Nev.) and cosponsored by Rep. Steve Knight (R-Calif.). The legislation directs the National Science Foundation (NSF) to support STEM education research focused on early childhood. H.R. 3397 includes Research and Technology Subcommittee Chairwoman Barbara Comstock’s (R-Va.) provisions that award grants to encourage young girls’ participation in computer science and update the NSF Noyce Teacher Scholarship program to include informatics. Chairman Smith: “The Building Blocks of STEM Act updates our research into early childhood STEM education—science, technology, engineering, math and computer science. The bill seeks to keep our nation’s workforce globally competitive in technology and innovation. I thank Science Committee members Rosen and Knight and Research and Technology Subcommittee Chairwoman Barbara Comstock for working in a bipartisan fashion to draft this bill.” Rep. Knight: “Careers in STEM fields often start with a childhood passion for learning. By encouraging more active engagement at younger ages, the Building Blocks of STEM Act will help ensure our future workforce is equipped with the tools and interest necessary to compete in a modern global economy.” Background: H.R. 3397 was introduced on November 13, 2017, and approved by the House Science, Space, and Technology Committee on November 15, 2017. Text of the bill can be found here. Read More

House Unanimously Approves Bipartisan Energy Infrastructure and Research Bills

2018/02/13

WASHINGTON – The U.S. House of Representatives today approved four bipartisan bills that maintain America’s leadership in energy research infrastructure and enhance Department of Energy (DOE) basic research. The Department of Energy Research Infrastructure Act (H.R. 4376) was introduced by Rep. Steve Knight (R-Calif.), vice chairman of the Energy Subcommittee. The Accelerating American Leadership in Science Act (H.R. 4377) was introduced by Rep. Randy Hultgren (R-Ill.), a member of the Energy Subcommittee. The Nuclear Energy Research Infrastructure Act (H.R. 4378) was introduced by Rep. Randy Weber (R-Texas), chairman of the Energy Subcommittee. The Low Dose Radiation Research Act (H.R. 4675) was introduced by Rep. Roger Marshall (R-Kan.), vice chairman of the Research and Technology Subcommittee. Chairman Smith: “These bills update and upgrade important Energy Department programs and facilities. Every year, the Energy Department’s national labs host more than 30,000 researchers. The research infrastructure bills championed by Reps. Weber, Knight and Hultgren ensure these scientists will continue to perform their cutting-edge basic research here in the United States. With passage of today’s five bipartisan research bills, including a STEM research bill, 20 of the 22 bills the Science Committee has brought to the House floor this Congress have been bipartisan pieces of legislation.”  Energy Subcommittee Vice Chairman Knight on H.R. 4376: “I’m incredibly happy the House passed the Department of Energy Research Infrastructure Act. The research programs supported by this bill have the potential to create a generational leap for American scientists in understanding energy and material sciences. When America forges the path in scientific discovery, the entire world benefits.” Rep. Hultgren on H.R. 4377: “The Accelerating American Leadership in Science Act will ensure America remains the destination for the world’s top researchers to explore the outer reaches of our scientific knowledge. Our national labs like Illinois’s own Fermilab and Argonne are global leaders in groundbreaking scientific research, employing thousands of scientists engaged in vital experiments. The Department of Energy’s Office of Science operates and maintains this large-scale research infrastructure which is beyond the capacity of a single university or business. The world is working to catch up and replicate our success, which is why we need to reaffirm American leadership in fields that improve lives and increase domestic jobs.” Energy Subcommittee Chairman Weber on H.R. 4378: “America is a land of opportunity, innovation, and advancement. This research reactor, the Versatile Neutron Source, is critical for the development of advanced reactor designs, materials, and nuclear fuels. This type of research requires access to fast neutrons, which are currently only available for civilian research in Russia. Nuclear energy research is an area with plenty of room for development. I am excited for the discoveries to come from our investment in stronger nuclear infrastructure. Many thanks to the Science Committee, Leadership, and my colleagues for their support of this bill." Research and Technology Subcommittee Vice Chairman Marshall on H.R. 4675: “Today is a great day for our medical industry. I am so proud of the support this bill has received. Radiation therapy has saved thousands of cancer patients’ lives. As medical technology and techniques continue to advance it is critical that we learn more about the effects of low-dose radiation. I look forward to the Senate also supporting this bill that will help our doctors better treat their patients.” Background: Rep. Knight’s DOE Research Infrastructure Act directs and authorizes the secretary of energy to upgrade the Advanced Light Source, to complete the Linac Coherent Light Source II High Energy upgrade and to complete construction of the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams via funding allocated from within the DOE Office of Science budget. The bill text can be found here. Rep. Hultgren’s Accelerating American Leadership in Science Act directs and authorizes the secretary of energy to upgrade the Advanced Photon Source, to construct a Long Baseline Neutrino Facility, to provide a proton power upgrade to the Spallation Neutron Source, and to construct a second target station for the Spallation Neutron Source via funding allocated from within the DOE Office of Science budget. The bill text can be found here. Rep. Weber’s Nuclear Energy Research Infrastructure Act directs and authorizes the secretary of energy to construct a Versatile Neutron Source user facility via funding allocated from within the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy. The bill text can be found here. Rep. Marshall’s Low Dose Radiation Research Act provides a low-dose radiation basic research program at DOE, which ensures that we develop a thorough knowledge of any health impacts of low levels of radiation and continue to use the best available science to serve and maximize our nation’s energy, medical and defense needs. The bill text can be found here. Read More

Full Committee Hearing - In Defense of Scientific Integrity: Examining the IARC Monograph Programme and Glyphosate Review

2018/02/06

Hearing charter Opening Statements: Full Committee Chairman Lamar Smith (R-Texas) Full Committee Vice Chairman Frank Lucas (R-Okla.) Witnesses: Dr. Anna Lowit, senior science adviser, Office of Pesticide Programs, Environmental Protection Agency (Truth in Testimony) Dr. Timothy Pastoor, CEO, Pastoor Science Communications (Truth in Testimony) Dr. Jennifer Sass, senior scientist, Natural Resources Defense Council (Truth in Testimony) Dr. Robert Tarone, (retired) mathematical statistician, U.S. National Cancer Institute and Biostatistics Director, International Epidemiology Institute (Truth in Testimony) Read More

Smith Demands Documents on Kaspersky Lab, Threatens Use of Compulsory Process Against DHS

2018/02/01

WASHINGTON – U.S. House Science, Space, and Technology Committee Chairman Lamar Smith (R-Texas) today sent a letter to the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) demanding a complete response to the committee’s December 5 request and threatening the use of compulsory process to obtain documents related to the DHS Binding Operational Directive (BOD) 17-01. The BOD required all government agencies to identify and remove Kaspersky Lab software from their computer systems. Today’s letter responds to the department’s failure to provide a full response to the chairman’s request for information regarding government-wide compliance with the directive. Smith requested a list of agencies that have not submitted the required reports to DHS, a list of agencies that have identified Kaspersky software on their systems, and communications related to the Office of Management and Budget’s role in ensuring compliance with the BOD. The letter reads in part: [Following the Department’s initial partial production in response to the Committee’s December 5 letter], the Department indicated that no further production would be forthcoming due to the pending litigation [by Kaspersky Lab against the Department]. Pending litigation is not a basis for declining to fully comply with the December 5, 2017, request for documents and information. The federal government must leverage all available resources to ensure that Kaspersky products have been completely removed from federal systems. This includes identifying all actions needed to eliminate or mitigate the risk, even beyond the risk to federal systems. As you know, Congress requires full and uninhibited access to information to ensure that it can effectively carry out its duty to identify shortcomings and areas for improvement within the federal government.  Given the serious nature of these concerns related to the Committee’s broader goal of uncovering all risks associated with Kaspersky, the Committee expects a full and complete response from the Department, including the requested briefing and production of the requested documents and communications, so that the Committee can fulfill its oversight responsibilities. If the Department does not provide all of the requested materials, the Committee will consider use of the compulsory process to obtain the information. The letter can be found here. Background On December 5, Chairman Smith sent a letter to DHS requesting additional documents from DHS related to BOD 17-01. On November 14, the House Science, Space, and Technology Committee held the second in a series of hearings examining the government’s use of Kaspersky Lab software. This hearing examined the implementation of DHS BOD 17-01 and included witnesses from DHS and the Department of Defense. On October 25, the House Science, Space, and Technology Committee held the first in a series of hearings examining the government’s use of Kaspersky Lab software. This hearing examined the risks associated with the use of Kaspersky Lab software and the inclusion of Kaspersky Lab on the federal purchasing schedules produced by the General Services Administration. On September 13, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) issued Binding Operational Directive (BOD) 17-01 directing all federal entities to identify and remove Kaspersky Lab software from their systems. On July 27, Chairman Smith sent a letter to 22 federal agencies requesting documents and information regarding their use of Kaspersky Lab software. Read More

Chairman Smith follow up to DHS re: Kaspersky Lab

2018/02/01

Chairman Smith's follow-up letter to DHS re: Kaspersky Lab can be found here. Read More

Full Committee Hearing - Department of Energy: Management and Priorities

2018/01/30

Hearing charter Opening Statement: Full Committee Chairman Lamar Smith (R-Texas) Witnesses: The Honorable Paul Dabbar, under secretary for science, Department of Energy (Truth in Testimony) The Honorable Mark Menezes, under secretary of energy, Department of Energy (Truth in Testimony) Read More

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Membership

Lamar Smith

TEXAS' 21st DISTRICT

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