Natural Resources

Committee on Natural Resources

Rob Bishop

Reps. Hice and Lowenthal Introduce Bill to Enhance Financial Aid for Mine Cleanup

2017/03/22

Today, Representatives Jody Hice (R-GA) and Alan Lowenthal (D-CA) introduced H.R. 1668, the “Bureau of Land Management Foundation Act.” H.R. 1668 establishes a new foundation that will leverage private funding to assist federal land management agencies with abandoned mine lands cleanup as well as other mission areas.  

When millions of gallons of toxic waste gushed into the Animas River from the Gold King Mine in 2015, the urgency to address the problem of pollution from abandoned mines became abundantly clear. By replacing substandard federal regulations with private sector policies and procedures, the Bureau of Land Management Foundation will increase the pace and scale of cleaning up contaminated water at abandoned mine sites across the nation. I look forward to working in a bipartisan manner with Rep. Lowenthal and my Resources Committee colleagues to implement comprehensive spill prevention methods,” Rep. Hice said.

The establishment of a Bureau of Land Management Foundation is long overdue. It would provide the BLM with an important partner, and allow private individuals and corporations to support the BLM’s diverse mission, which includes activities such as managing wild horses, protecting cultural resources and cleaning up abandoned hardrock mines. I am proud to work cooperatively with Rep. Hice and the Natural Resources Committee to get this bill passed,” Rep. Lowenthal said.

Background

Last Congress, the House passed H.R. 3884 (Rep. Hice), the “Bureau of Land Management Foundation Act,” by a bipartisan voice vote on July 5, 2016. 

Read More

Subcommittee Presses Panel on Status of Puerto Rico’s Power Utility Restructuring Agreement

2017/03/22

Today, the Subcommittee on Indian, Insular and Alaska Native Affairs held an oversight hearing on the status of the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (PREPA) Restructuring Support Agreement (RSA).

PREPA, the state-owned, self-regulated monopoly that operates as Puerto Rico's public utility, provides power generation to the 3.4 million Americans residing on the island. The utility faces major structural and operational inefficiencies and is $8.9 billion in debt. The current RSA, which is the framework for ongoing voluntary restructuring negotiations over PREPA's debt obligation and related structural reforms, is set to expire on March 31, 2017.

Puerto Rico Resident Commissioner Jenniffer González asked Governor Ricardo Rosselló “when do you understand any agreement will be reached – a month, weeks, how much longer?” But Gov. Rosselló’s technical advisor couldn’t give a concrete answer in spite of the looming March 31 deadline.

With a major bond payment of $455 million due on July 1st, Subcommittee Chairman Doug LaMalfa (R-CA) stressed the importance of finding a consensual agreement for the utility to keep the lights on in Puerto Rico.

In order to get PREPA back on track and stabilize the power generation for the residents and the businesses of the island, serious decisions need to be made by leaders in the Government of Puerto Rico, the Governing Board of PREPA and the various creditor communities. The island cannot afford a delay any longer,” LaMalfa stated.

Witness Stephen Spencer, testifying on behalf of certain funds managed by Franklin Advisers Inc. and OppenheimerFunds, Inc., talked about the dangerous outcomes of a jeopardized RSA.  

“Failure to close this deal would have ramifications far beyond PREPA," Spencer stated. "Failure to close a deal negotiated over two years would call into question Puerto Rico’s good faith in negotiating other restructuring."

Members reviewed efforts of the Oversight Board, established under PROMESA (P.L. 114-187), to support ongoing voluntary restructuring agreements and facilitate additional consensual negotiations between creditors and various other debt-ridden instrumentalities within the Commonwealth.

"One of the most difficult issues the Oversight Board has had to tackle in advancing the PROMESA agenda has been determining as accurately as possible just what the Government of Puerto Rico’s revenues and expenses are," Oversight Board Chairman José Carrión said. 

"This is a far more challenging task than you, as federal lawmakers, may imagine," Carrion added, in reference to the fact that the Government’s most recent audited financial statements cover the period ending June 30, 2014.

Under PROMESA, the Oversight Board has tools, including subpoena power, to conduct an independent analysis of the financial condition of the Commonwealth and its covered instrumentalities.

Click here to view full witness testimony.

Read More

Bishop Response to Successful Gulf of Mexico Lease Sale

2017/03/22

Today, the Department of the Interior’s Lease Sale 247 for oil and gas parcels in the Gulf of Mexico brought in over $274 million for over 900,000 acres in the Outer Continental Shelf offshore Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama. Chairman Rob Bishop (R-UT) issued the following statement:

Finally, we are taking advantage of our vast natural resources offshore. For years we witnessed the prior administration deliberatively cancel or limit lease sales and use a lack of industry interest as the excuse. With a new administration that is open to responsible development, we are seeing a strong indication of the exact opposite – a private sector eager to unleash domestic production and competitive investment in our federal lands.”

Read More

Panel: Infrastructure Package Must Include Permitting Reforms to Access Raw Materials

2017/03/21

Today, the Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources discussed the importance of domestically sourced raw materials for the upcoming infrastructure package.  

Aggregates such as crushed stone, sand, and gravel are the literal foundation of many of our infrastructure projects,” Subcommittee Chairman Paul Gosar (R-AZ) said.Expedited permitting regimes for infrastructure projects will have little to no effect if the mines that supply materials to those projects do not share the same accelerated process.”

Nigel Steward, Managing Director of Copper and Diamond Operations at Rio Tinto, talked about the arduous permitting process in the U.S., which takes an average of 7 to 10 years.  

The U.S. has one of the longest permitting processes in the world for mining projects,” Steward stated.By comparison, permitting in Australia and Canada, which have similar environmental standards and practices as the U.S., takes between two and three years.”

More than the prolonged permitting timeline, Ward Nye Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer of Martin Marietta added that mining projects are subject to further delays from litigious-happy special interest groups.

Ultimately, not only does this excessive regulation cost time, money and jobs, but critically, it often puts the fate of vital infrastructure projects in the hands of special interest groups and their handpicked courts, instead of Congress and state governments,” Nye said.  

The economic benefits extend far beyond the aggregates themselves, mining supports countless other industries and small businesses. Not to mention, domestically sourced raw materials keep project costs down – a gift for American taxpayers’ wallets.

[T]o meet the demand that will result from a sustained and substantial infrastructure investment plan, a robust mining sector is necessary. One cannot happen without the other,Michael Brennan, Senior Vice President of the Associated Equipment Distributors, stated. “Everyone from construction equipment distributors to restaurant employees to auto mechanics suffer when there’s a significant downturn in an important industry.

Putting today’s regulatory regime in perspective, Mr. Nye posed a rhetorical question: “Could [the Hoover Dam] be built today?

It is critical for Congress to pair infrastructure investments with regulatory reforms, including targeting permitting inefficiencies and red tape holding back the foundation of infrastructure projects – aggregates.

Members were quick to note that reforming the permitting process does not unravel existing environmental safeguards at both the federal and state level.

Click here to view full witness testimony.  

Read More

Senate Passes CRA to Restore Wildlife Management Authority to State of Alaska

2017/03/21

Today, the Senate passed H.J. Res. 69 sponsored by Rep. Don Young (R-AK). The joint resolution of disapproval under the Congressional Review Act will overturn the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) rule on “Non-Subsistence Take of Wildlife, and Public Participation and Closure Procedures, on National Wildlife Refuges in Alaska.”

This CRA ensures that the role of states will not be supplanted by the federal government. States are the experts and more than capable of responsibly managing wildlife. If the federal government supersedes the State of Alaska, it could happen to any one of the lower 48 states. I look forward to President Trump signing this joint resolution into law, ” Chairman Rob Bishop (R-UT) said.

Since its inception, I’ve worked to overturn this shortsighted and illegal rulemaking by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife. Not only was it a massive jurisdictional power grab, it clearly undermined the laws passed by Congress to protect Alaska’s authority to manage fish and wildlife upon all our lands. Overturning this rule could not be possible without the support of Senator Dan Sullivan and Senator Lisa Murkowski, the State of Alaska – who is fighting this battle in court – and the numerous stakeholders that joined our cause.Chairman Emeritus Young stated.

Background:

On February 16, 2017, the House passed H.J. Res. 69 by a vote of 225-193.

On August, 5, 2016, FWS issued its final rule, which seizes authority away from the State of Alaska to manage fish and wildlife for both recreational and subsistence uses on federal wildlife refuges in Alaska.

The Congressional Review Act empowers Congress to review new federal regulations issued by government agencies. With the passage of a joint resolution and the signature of the president, Congress can overrule a regulation.

Click here for additional information on the rule. 

Read More

Panel: Ballooning Federal Estate a Primary Barrier to Modernizing Infrastructure on Federal Lands

2017/03/16

Today, the Subcommittee on Federal Lands held an oversight hearing on ways to improve infrastructure and management at the National Park Service (NPS) and the Forest Service (USFS).

A reasonable person might conclude that federal agencies with deferred maintenance backlogs of $6 billion [USFS] and $12 billion [NPS] should first take care of the land it currently administers before acquiring new land. Yet, our land management agencies continue to push for additional land to be included in their systems. Real conservation means taking care of the things that you already own,” Rep. Scott Tipton (R-CO) said.

Prioritizing the care and management of existing federal lands was echoed by the panel. Executive Director of the Property and Environment Research Center Reed Watson pointed out the significant increase in units managed by the NPS over the past decade despite its growing maintenance backlog. NPS managed 390 units in 2006, today they manage 417 units.

It is ironic and unfortunate that many of the laws and regulations intended to enhance the value and accessibility of our national parks and forests are, in fact, accelerating their deterioration,Watson stated.

According to John Palatiello, President of the Business Coalition for Fair Competition, the massive federal estate rivals that of the Soviet Union and the federal government doesn’t know what it actually owns. He also referenced remarks from President Ronald Reagan during a question-and-answer session in Cleveland, OH in 1988:“West of the Mississippi River, your first glance at the map, you think the whole thing is red, the government owns so much property […] I don’t know any place other than the Soviet Union where the government owns more land than ours does.”

Thousands of acres, valued at billions of dollars, could be in Federal ownership that Uncle Sam doesn’t know he owns,” Palatiello added.Not only does the government lack a current, accurate land inventory, but dozens of agencies spend funds operating and maintaining a variety of out of date, inaccurate and duplicate single-purpose land records databases.”

In addition to creating an accurate inventory of the federal estate, the panel encouraged the use of the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) for deferred maintenance over further land acquisition.

The majority of LWCF appropriations have actually exacerbated the federal land infrastructure crisis by stretching the agencies’ maintenance budgets over an ever-expanding the federal estate,” Watson said.  

Other witnesses and members discussed streamlining cumbersome regulatory processes, increasing opportunities for philanthropic donations and engaging with volunteer and partner groups to improve infrastructure and management while saving costs and increasing efficiency.  

Click here to read full witness testimony. 

Read More

Trump Budget Blueprint Brings Accountably to Federal Bureaucracy

2017/03/16

Today, the Trump administration released its budget blueprint for Fiscal Year 2018. Chairman Rob Bishop (R-UT) issued the following statement:

“Bold and creative solutions are sorely needed to reform bloated agencies and programs so they better serve the American people. This framework is a positive start. I look forward to building on these ideas through the budget process and our Committee’s work.”  

Background

  • Reduces new major federal land acquisitions and refocuses budget on maintaining and improving existing federal lands
  • Increases funding for the Department of the Interior (DOI) programs that support environmentally responsible development of energy on public lands and offshore waters
  • Streamlines management operations to support responsible land stewardship in the National Park Service (NPS), Fish and Wildlife Service and Bureau of Land Management
  • Uses funds to leverage private investment in federal lands, reducing costs to the taxpayer and creating innovative streams of revenue
  • Increases funding for the NPS’s deferred maintenance backlog
  • Eliminates unnecessary, lower priority or duplicative programs including discretionary Abandoned Mine Land grants that overlap with existing mandatory grants
  • Provides funding for DOI’s U.S. Geological Survey to focus investments in essential science programs
  • Eliminates a number of unnecessary programs within National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration while codifying their core function in fishery management
Supports tribal sovereignty and self-determination across Indian Country by focusing on core funding and services to support ongoing tribal government operations Read More

Bishop Statement on Approval of Greens Hollow Lease in Central Utah

2017/03/16

Chairman Rob Bishop (R-UT) issued the following statement following Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke approval of the Greens Hollow coal lease in central Utah:

“After over a decade of bureaucratic purgatory, I’m happy to see Secretary Zinke approve this lease. This will be a vital source of employment, affordable energy and revenue to the people of central Utah and the country for decades to come, and I thank the Trump administration for doing the right thing.”

Background

Coal mining in the Greens Hollow area of Utah currently supports 1,700 jobs. It is estimated to contain more than 55 million tons of coal, which will provide energy to an estimated 11.8 million homes. The lease for this specific tract was delayed by bureaucratic red-tape for twelve years by both the U.S. Forest Service and the Bureau of Land Management.   Read More

Marine Monument Designations Sideline Communities and the Domestic Fishing Industry

2017/03/15

Today, the Subcommittee on Water, Power and Oceans held an oversight hearing on the creation and management of marine monuments and sanctuaries. The panel overwhelmingly objected to the lack of local input, transparency and scientific scrutiny in the marine monument designation process.  

Federal decision-making directly impacts local citizens, local economies and the environment. It is important to review how these decisions are being implemented, and, where needed, correct or improve the laws guiding these decisions,Subcommittee Vice Chairman Daniel Webster (R-FL) said.

Chairman Rob Bishop (R-UT) discussed his visit to New Bedford, MA, the nation’s top-grossing commercial fishing port, with Democrat Mayor Jon Mitchell, who was unable to attend due to weather.

“[D]uring my visit to New Bedford, we met with dozens of local fishermen and industry to talk about the Magnuson-Stevens reauthorization as well as the state of federal fisheries management. It didn’t take long for the conversation to quickly turn to the then-proposed Marine National Monument off of the coast of Massachusetts. However, the fishermen weren’t just blindly opposing the Monument, they actually came to the table with a pragmatic solution,” Bishop stated.

Unfortunately with the stroke of his pen, President Obama ignored a viable alternative developed with stakeholders and unnecessarily cordoned off vital acreage for fishing communities off the coast of Cape Cod.

In his written testimony, Mayor Mitchell pointed out inherently flawed issues in the monument designation process: “It lacks sufficient amounts of all the ingredients that good policy-making requires: scientific rigor, direct industry input, transparency, and a deliberate pace that allows adequate time and space for review,” Mitchell wrote.  

"A decision-making process driven by the simple assertion of executive branch authority ultimately leaves ocean management decisions permanently vulnerable to short-term political considerations," Mitchell added. "Such an outcome is cause for deep concern no matter one’s position in the current policy debates."

Brian Hallman, Executive Director of the American Tunaboat Association, outlined the troubling conflicts monuments and sanctuaries have with established procedures including the federal Magnuson-Stevens Act and international treaties and conventions.

The fundamental purpose of marine monuments, as I understand it, is to preclude, or at least severely limit, human activity in the designated area […] but limiting fishing via marine monuments makes no sense whatsoever. […] The establishment of marine monuments completely pre-empts and usurps these longstanding, legally binding and effective processes,” Hallman stated. 

Click here to read full witness testimony.

Last week Chairman Bishop and Rep. Aumua Amata Coleman Radewagen (R-American Samoa) sent a letter to President Trump requesting the removal of all marine monument fishing prohibitions. Click here to read the letter.  Read More

Latest Oil and Gas Figures Demonstrate Obama Administration’s Failed Energy Legacy

2017/03/15

House Committee on Natural Resources Chairman Rob Bishop (R-UT) issued the following statement in reaction to the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) release of data concerning oil and gas leasing on federal lands under the Obama administration:

“Production on federal lands was all but impossible under the Obama administration from the layers of additional red tape to the dwindling number of leases offered year after year. These numbers reflect steadfast efforts by the Obama administration to squelch responsible energy development.

“We will work with President Trump and his team to turn the page and support American families through a more robust, diverse and affordable domestic energy supply.”    

According to BLM’s figures, FY2016 reflected the lowest total amount of leased acreage for the years statistically available, since 1988. From the end of FY2008 to FY2016, the total amount of leased acreage fell by 20 million from 47.2 to 27.2 million acres, and the amount of applications for permit to drill approved annually fell from 6,617 to 2,184.

Read More

3.22.17. IIANA. 10:00 AM.

2017-03-22 17:05:01


3.21.17. EMR. 10:00 AM

2017-03-21 16:06:15


3.16.17. FL. 10:00 AM

2017-03-16 16:09:28


3.15.17. WPO. 10:00 AM.

2017-03-15 15:35:07


Ms. Rebecca Benally on "Utah Public Lands Initiative Act"

2017-03-10 19:42:29


3.9.17. IIANA. 10:00 AM

2017-03-09 17:25:23


3.1.17. WPO. 10:00 AM.

2017-03-01 17:00:55


Bishop - H.J. Res. 69

2017-02-16 18:54:54


Bishop Opening Statement 02.07.17

2017-02-07 19:13:18


2.7.17. FC. 11:00 AM.

2017-02-07 17:55:01


Contact Information

1324 Longworth HOB
Washington, DC 20515
Phone 202-225-2761
Fax 202-225-5929
naturalresources.house.gov


Membership

Rob Bishop

UTAH's 1st DISTRICT

Recent Videos