S. 818, A bill to amend the Grand Ronde Reservation Act to make technical corrections, and for other purposes

S. 818

A bill to amend the Grand Ronde Reservation Act to make technical corrections, and for other purposes

Sponsor
Sen. Ron Wyden

Date
December 6, 2016 (114th Congress, 2nd Session)

Staff Contact
Communications

Floor Situation

On­­­­ Tuesday, December 6, 2016, the House will consider S. 818, a bill to amend the Grand Ronde Reservation Act to make technical corrections, and for other purposes, under suspension of the rules. S. 818 was introduced by Sen. Ron Wyden (D-OR) on March 19, 2015, and was referred to the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs, which ordered the bill reported, with an amendment in the nature of a substitute, on November 18, 2015. The Senate passed S. 818 by unanimous consent on July 14, 2016.

Bill Summary

S. 818 establishes a reservation for the Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde Community of Oregon. Specifically, the bill authorizes the Secretary of the Interior to place in trust real property located within the boundaries of the original 1857 reservation of the Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde Community of Oregon if the real property is conveyed or otherwise transferred to the United States.

Background

The Confederated Tribes of the Grande Ronde Community of Oregon is a federally recognized Indian tribe. On June 30, 1857, a reservation of approximately 60,000 acres was set aside by President James Buchanan. In 1954 Congress terminated federal supervision over the Tribe and its reservation, but restored this recognition in 1983.  Any new reservation had to be approved by Congress.[1]

Currently the Tribe has 10,311 acres of land held in trust. All but 259 acres are heavily forested, and the Tribe is actively engaged in timber management.  The remaining acres host tribal buildings and homes, a casino and other infrastructure. To increase its land base, the Tribe has been acquiring additional lands within the original 1857 reservation footprint. S 818 will simplify the ability of the Tribe to place these post-1988 lands into trust and made part of its reservation if the real property is conveyed to the United States on behalf of the Tribe.  These lands could not be used for gaming, with a specific exception for lands within 2 miles of the existing gaming facility located along State Highway 18.

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[1] See Senate Report 114-230 at 1-2.

Cost

The Congressional Budget Office estimates that implementing S. 818 have no significant effect on the federal budget. Any change in the Department’s administrative costs under the bill would be subject to appropriation and would not exceed $500,000 in any year. Enacting S. 818 would not affect direct spending or revenues, and would not increase net direct spending or on-budget deficits in any of the four consecutive 10-year periods beginning in 2026.

Additional Information

For questions or further information please contact Jake Vreeburg with the House Republican Policy Committee by email or at 6-1828.