S. 231, Multinational Species Conservation Funds Semipostal Stamp Reauthorization

S. 231

Multinational Species Conservation Funds Semipostal Stamp Reauthorization

Sponsor
Sen. Rob Portman

Date
September 8, 2014 (113th Congress, 2nd Session)

Staff Contact
Communications

Floor Situation

On Monday, September 8, 2014, the House will consider S. 231, the Multinational Species Conservation Funds Semipostal Stamp Reauthorization, under a suspension of the rules. S. 231 was introduced on February 7, 2013 by Sen. Rob Portman (R-OH), where it passed in the Senate by unanimous consent. The bill was then referred to the House Committees on Oversight and Government Reform and Natural Resources.

Bill Summary

S. 231 amends the Multinational Species Conservation Funds Semipostal Stamp Act of 2010 (39 U.S.C. 416 note) to require the U.S. Postal Service continue offering the Multinational Species Conservation Funds Semipostal Stamp for an additional four years

Background

Since 1998, the U.S. Postal Service has issued “semipostal” stamps – stamps that purchasers may use to mail a First-Class letter, but which they voluntarily pay a surcharge over usual First-Class rates.[1] This surcharge is a means to donate to the cause designated by the stamp. In 2010, Congress authorized the creation of a semipostal stamp to benefit the Multinational Species Conservation Funds (MSCF).[2] The MSCF is administered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.[3] Authorized by Congress in 1999, it was established to recognize “an unprecedented decline of certain species and to help save some of the world’s fastest disappearing animals in their natural habitats.”[4] The stamp supports conservation efforts benefiting a number of endangered and threatened animals.[5] Since its establishment, the stamp program has generated approximately $2.5 million in proceeds for conservation efforts.[6]

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[1] Senate Report 113-235, at 2.
[2] See Id.
[3] Senate Report 113-235, at 1.
[4] Id. at 2.
[5] Id. at 1.
[6] Id. at 3.

Cost

CBO estimates that implementing S.231 would have no significant discretionary cost to the federal government.[7] Although this legislation would affect on-budget direct spending, CBO estimates that those effects would not be significant.[8]

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[7] http://www.cbo.gov/sites/default/files/cbofiles/attachments/s231.pdf
[8] See Id.

Additional Information

For questions or further information contact the GOP Conference at 5-5107.