S. 230: To Authorize the Peace Corps Commemorative Foundation to Establish a Commemorative Work in the District of Columbia and its Environs, and for other purposes

S. 230

To Authorize the Peace Corps Commemorative Foundation to Establish a Commemorative Work in the District of Columbia and its Environs, and for other purposes

Sponsor
Sen. Rob Portman

Date
January 13, 2014 (113th Congress, 2nd Session)

Staff Contact
Communications

Floor Situation

On Monday, January 13, 2014, the House will consider S. 230, a bill to Authorize the Peace Corps Commemorative Foundation to Establish a Commemorative Work in the District of Columbia and its Environs, and for other purposes, under a suspension of the rules.  The bill was introduced on February 7, 2013 by Sen. Rob Portman (R-OH), where it passed by unanimous consent.  The bill was then reported to the House Committee on Natural Resources, where it was ordered to be reported by unanimous consent.

Bill Summary

S. 230 authorizes the Peace Corps Commemorative Foundation to establish commemorative work on Federal Land in the District of Columbia to commemorate the mission of the Peace Corps and the ideals on which the Peace Corps was founded.  This legislation prohibits the use of federal funds to pay any expense of the establishment of the commemorative work, and requires the establishment of the commemorative work to be in accordance with the Commemorative Works Act (40 U.S.C. Chapter 89).  Under the Act, “any entity that receives a permit to construct a memorial in the District of Columbia must donate an amount equal to 10 percent of the memorial’s estimated construction cost.”[1]  This money, as well as remaining project funds, would be available for monument maintenance.

Background

“The Peace Corps traces its roots and mission to 1960, when then-Senator John F. Kennedy, during a speech to students at the University of Michigan, challenged those young adults to give two years of service to help people in developing countries.”[1]  President Kennedy later signed an executive order establishing the Peace Corps.  Since its creation, over 210,000 volunteers have served in 139 countries “to train local people in technologies and issues including agricultural production, water quality improvement, basic education, health and AIDS education, information technology, and environmental protection.[2]

Cost

CBO estimates that enacting this legislation would have an insignificant impact on the federal budget.[1]

Additional Information

For questions or further information contact the GOP Conference at 5-5107.