S. 1629, District of Columbia Courts, Public Defender Service, and Court Services and Offender Supervision Agency Act of 2015

S. 1629

District of Columbia Courts, Public Defender Service, and Court Services and Offender Supervision Agency Act of 2015

Sponsor
Sen. Ron Johnson

Date
January 11, 2016 (114th Congress, 2nd Session)

Staff Contact
John Huston

Floor Situation

On Monday, January 11, 2016, the House will consider S. 1629, the District of Columbia Courts, Public Defender Service, and Court Services and Offender Supervision Agency Act of 2015, under suspension of the rules. The bill was introduced on June 18, 2015, by Sen. Ron Johnson (R-WI) and passed the Senate by unanimous consent on September 10, 2015.

Bill Summary

S. 1629 provides additional authority to several District of Columbia (DC) judicial offices to make managerial and personnel decisions, including: the authority to collect debts and erroneous payments made to current and former employees and the authority of the Director of Court Services and the Offender Supervision Agency (CSOSA) to develop and operate incentive programs for sentenced offenders. The bill also provides permanent authority for the Director of CSOSA to accept nonmonetary gifts, donations, property, or services to facilitate the work of the Agency; and the authority to use reimbursements from the DC government for space and services provided.  The bill also authorizes the Public Defender Service to accept and use public grants, private contributions, and voluntary services. [1]

_________________
[1] See House Report 114-368 at 2.

Background

The National Capital Revitalization and Self Government Improvement Act of 1997 restructured DC judicial offices, making the federal government responsible for their administration.  S. 1629 expands the authority of several District of Columbia judicial offices to make certain managerial decisions.[1]

S. 1629 is similar to H.R. 4185, the District of Columbia Courts, Public Defender Service, and Court Services and Offender Supervision Agency Act of 2014, which passed the House by voice vote on July 14, 2014. The Senate did not act on the House-passed bill in the 113th Congress.

______________________
[2] See House Report 114-368 at 2.

Cost

The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) estimates that the net effect on direct spending by enacting S. 1629 would be negligible. S. 1629 would not affect revenues.

Additional Information

For questions or further information please contact John Huston with the House Republican Policy Committee by email or at 6-5539.