S. 1103: A bill to extend the term of the incumbent Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation

S. 1103

A bill to extend the term of the incumbent Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation

Sponsor
Sen. Patrick J. Leahy

Date
July 26, 2011 (112th Congress, 1st Session)

Staff Contact
Sarah Makin

Floor Situation

On Monday, July 25, 2011, the House is scheduled consider S. 1033 under a suspension of the rules, requiring a two-thirds majority vote for passage.  The resolution was introduced by Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-VT) on May 26, 2011, and referred to the Committee on the Judiciary.  The bill was approved by the Senate, with an amendment, by voice vote on July 21, 2011.

Bill Summary

S. 1033 would extend the term of the current director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Robert S. Mueller III, by two years to allow him to continue in office until August 3, 2013.  Under current law, the term of the director would expire in August, 2011.

The bill would amend the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 to extend for two years the 10 year term of Director Mueller.

Background

The current FBI Director, Robert S. Mueller III, was confirmed by the Senate on August 2, 2001.  Director Mueller's appointment was approved by President Bush on August 4, 2001 and he began to serve his ten-year term on September 4, 2001.  By statute, the FBI Director is limited to one 10-year, non-renewable term.  In May 2011, President Obama announced his intention to seek legislation that would extend Mr. Mueller's term of office for two years.  On May 26, 2011, Senator Patrick Leahy introduced S. 1103, a bill that would extend the term of the incumbent Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation. 

This legislation would not affect the single, ten-year term for future directors.  Nor does it limit in any way the President's authority to remove Director Mueller at any time during his extended two-year term.  S. 1103 also provides for a separate Senate confirmation vote following enactment of the legislation.

Cost

According to the Congressional Budget Office (CBO), enacting the bill would have no significant cost to the  federal government.  Enacting S. 1103 would not affect direct spending or revenues; therefore, pay-as-you-go procedures do not apply.