H.Res. 758, a resolution strongly condemning the actions of the Russian Federation, under Vladimir Putin, which has carried out a policy of aggression against neighboring countries aimed at political and economic domination

H.Res. 758

a resolution strongly condemning the actions of the Russian Federation, under Vladimir Putin, which has carried out a policy of aggression against neighboring countries aimed at political and economic domination

Date
December 3, 2014 (113th Congress, 2nd Session)

Staff Contact
Communications

Floor Situation

On Wednesday, December 3, 2014, the House will consider H.Res. 758, a resolution strongly condemning the actions of the Russian Federation, under Vladimir Putin, which has carried out a policy of aggression against neighboring countries aimed at political and economic domination, as amended.  H.Res. 758 was introduced by Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-IL) on November 18, 2014 and was referred to the House Foreign Affairs Committee.  The bill was marked up on November 20, 2014 and was ordered reported, as amended, by unanimous consent.

Bill Summary

H.Res. 758 supports efforts of Ukraine’s President and its people to establish peace in their country, including the full withdrawal of Russian forces.  The resolution condemns the continuing aggression by Russia against Ukraine, Georgia, and Moldova, and affirms the right of those states to exercise sovereignty within their borders.  H.Res. 758 states that Russia’s military intervention in Ukraine violates its international obligations and poses a threat to international peace and security.  The resolution urges the President to cooperate with European allies in refusing to recognize Russian sovereignty over Crimea, and calls on Russia to remove its forces and equipment from the territory of and end its support for separatist forces in Ukraine, Georgia, and Moldova.

H.Res. 758 calls on Russia to end its violations of the cease-fire announced in September of 2014.  The resolution urges Russia to reverse its illegal annexation of Crimea. The resolution also urges the President to work with allies to impose visa bans, asset freezes, and other measures on Russia to compel it to end its violation of Ukraine’s sovereignty.  H.Res. 758 urges the President to provide Ukraine with lethal and non-lethal defense articles, services, and training, as well as timely intelligence.  It calls on NATO, Europe, and other nations to suspend military cooperation with Russia, and reaffirms the commitment of the U.S. to its obligations under the North Atlantic Treaty.

The resolution urges the President to review the U.S. Armed Forces and NATO forces to determine if they are sufficient to meet the obligations of collective self-defense under Article 5 of the North Atlantic Treaty, and to specify measures needed to remedy any deficiencies.  H.Res. 758 welcomes the decision by France to suspend delivery of Mistral-class warships to Russia and urges the U.S., France, and other NATO partners to consider alternative acquisition options for the warships.

H.Res 758 urges the President to hold Russia publicly accountable for its violations of the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty, and to work with allies on a strategy to ensure Russia is unable to gain a benefit by its development of military systems that violate the INF Treaty.  The resolution calls for energy diversification initiatives that would reduce Russia’s ability to use energy exports as a means of applying political or economic pressure, including calls on the U.S. to promote increased natural gas exports and energy efficiency.

H.Res. 758 calls for a multilateral strategy to increase international broadcasting in the Russian language of news and information.  The resolution urges the State Department to identify key diplomatic posts in Europe to evaluate the political, economic, and cultural influence of Russia and to coordinate with host governments on an appropriate response.  The resolution calls on Russia to end its support for the Assad regime in Syria.  It urges the President to demand—in every engagement with Russia—that it cease its destabilizing behavior.

The resolution urges Russia to seek a mutually beneficial relationship with the U.S. based on respect for the independence and sovereignty of all countries, and calls for the reestablishment of a close and cooperative relationship between the people of the U.S. and Russia based on the shared pursuit of democracy, human rights, and peace among all nations.

Background

In February of 2014, former Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych fled Kiev as a result of protracted conflicts between antigovernment protestors and Ukrainian security forces in which up to 100 people were killed.[1]  The Ukrainian parliament approved a new pro-Western government in February.[2]

In response to the approval of Ukraine’s new pro-Western interim government in February, Russia seized Ukraine’s Crimea region and annexed it in March of 2014.[3]  “In April and May, armed pro-Russian separatists seized areas of the Donbas region of eastern Ukraine, which was made possible by men, weaponry, and leadership from Russia.  Ukrainian forces regrouped and made substantial gains against the separatists in July and August, but in late August and early September, U.S. and NATO officials say Russia stepped up its support to the separatists, including by deploying several thousand Russian troops to fight in Ukraine.  Both the Russian troops and the separatists have been supplied with hundreds of tanks, armored personnel carriers, artillery, surface-to-air missiles, and other military equipment from Russia.  As a result, Ukrainian forces have lost ground and may lose more if Russia continues to press its offensive.”[4]  Additionally, on July 17, 2014, Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 was shot down over separatist-held area in Ukraine, killing 298 people.[5]  The flight “was destroyed by a Russian-made missile provided to the separatist forces by the Russian Federation.”[6]  Although terms of a cease-fire were announced on September 5, 2014, Russia and the separatists it supports are presently violating it.[7]

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[1] Steven Woehrel, Ukraine: Current Issues and U.S. Policy, Congressional Research Service (Sep. 4, 2014) at 1-2.
[2] Id. at 2.
[3] Id. at Summary.
[4] Id.
[5] Id. at 10.
[6] H.Res. 726.
[7] Id.

Cost

A CBO cost estimate is not available.

Additional Information

For questions or further information contact the GOP Conference at 5-5107.