H.Res. 309: Expressing the sense of the House of Representatives that North Korea should immediately stop any hostile rhetoric and activity towards the Republic of Korea and engage in mutual dialogue to enhance inter-Korean relations

H.Res. 309

Expressing the sense of the House of Representatives that North Korea should immediately stop any hostile rhetoric and activity towards the Republic of Korea and engage in mutual dialogue to enhance inter-Korean relations

Sponsor
Rep. Peter King

Date
June 15, 2009 (111th Congress, 1st Session)

Staff Contact
Communications

Floor Situation

H.Res. 309 is being considered under suspension of the rules, requiring a two-thirds vote for passage. The legislation was introduced by Rep. Peter King (R-NY) on March 31, 2009.

Bill Summary

H.Res. 309 resolves that it is the sense of the House of Representatives that:

•  "North Korea should immediately stop any hostile rhetoric and activity towards the Republic of Korea and engage in mutual dialogue to enhance inter-Korean relations;

•  "North Korea should fully implement the Six-Party joint statement of September 19, 2005, verifiably abandon all of its nuclear weapons and existing nuclear programs, and return to the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) at an early date;

•  "North Korea should comply with United Nations Security Council Resolution 1718;

•  "The United States remains committed to the promotion of inter-Korean dialogue and cooperation; and

•  "The strategic importance of the strong alliance between the United States and the Republic of Korea, in promoting peace and prosperity on the Korean Peninsula and in Northeast Asia, should be recognized."

 

Background

According to the resolution's findings, North Korean leadership continues to pursue its nuclear ambitions while up to 2 million North Koreans reportedly starved to death during the late 1990s and hundreds of thousands fled North Korea in search of freedom and food. On January 30, 2009, North Korea announced that it would nullify all inter-Korean agreements that are in pursuit of putting an end to the state of political and military confrontations and abrogate the agreements on the Sea Demarcation Line, known as the "Northern Limit Line." Recently, on May 25, 2009, North Korea tested a nuclear weapon. North Korea is thought to possess enough reprocessed plutonium for between six and eight nuclear weapons.