H.Res. 132: Honoring the life and memory of the Chiricahua Apache leader Goyathlay or Goyaale, also known as Geronimo, and recognizing the 100th anniversary of his death on February 17, 2009, as a time of reflection and the commencement of a "Healing" for all Apache

H.Res. 132

Honoring the life and memory of the Chiricahua Apache leader Goyathlay or Goyaale, also known as Geronimo, and recognizing the 100th anniversary of his death on February 17, 2009, as a time of reflection and the commencement of a "Healing" for all Apache

Sponsor
Rep. Raul M. Grijalva

Date
February 24, 2009 (111th Congress, 1st Session)

Staff Contact
Communications

Floor Situation

H.Res. 132 is being considered on the floor under suspension of the rules, requiring a two-thirds majority vote for passage. This legislation was introduced by Representative Raul Grijalva (D-AZ) on February 4, 2009.

Bill Summary

H.Res. 132 resolves that the House "honors the life of Goyathlay, his extraordinary bravery, and his commitment to the defense of his homeland, his people, and Apache ways of life; and
recognizes the 100 anniversary of the death of Goyathlay as a time of reflection of his deeds on behalf of his people."

Background

The Chiricahua Apache leader Gotholay (better known as Geronimo) died on February 17, 1909. This February 19th represents the 100th anniversary of his death. Geronimo was born in June 1829, to the Bedonkohe band of the Apache tribe in what was then part of Mexico.

In 1858, Mexican soldiers attacked the Bedonkohe people, setting off a conflict that would last for 30 years. Geronimo became to be recognized as a military leader by his people in their fight against first Mexico and then the United States. Geronimo's band was eventually interned by the U.S. Army at San Carolos, Arizona.

After leading his people out of captivity, Geronimo continued to fight Mexican and American troops, and upon his surrender to U.S. authorities was removed to Fort Sill, Oklahoma, as a prisoner of war. Geronimo died and was buried at Fort Sill in 1909.