H.Res. 1231: Celebrating the 50th anniversary of the United States Television Infrared Observation Satellite, the world's first meteorological satellite, launched by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration on April 1, 1960, and fulfilling the promise of Pres

H.Res. 1231

Celebrating the 50th anniversary of the United States Television Infrared Observation Satellite, the world's first meteorological satellite, launched by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration on April 1, 1960, and fulfilling the promise of Pres

Sponsor
Rep. Rush D. Holt

Date
May 4, 2010 (111th Congress, 2nd Session)

Staff Contact

Floor Situation

H.Res. 1231 is expected to be considered on the floor of the House on Tuesday, May 4, 2010, under a motion to suspend the rules, requiring a two-thirds vote for passage. The legislation was introduced by Rep. Rush D. Holt (D-NJ) on March 25, 2010.

Bill Summary

H.Res. 1231 would resolve that the House of Representatives:
• "Celebrates the achievement of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the Television Infrared Observation Satellite (TIROS I) team who worked together to enable the successful launch and operation of TIROS I by the United States to establish applications of space systems and technology for the benefit of people worldwide;
• "Supports science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education programs which are critical for preparing the next generation of engineers and scientists to lead future United States space endeavors;
• "Recognizes the role of the United States space program in strengthening the scientific and engineering foundation that contributes to United States innovation and economic growth; and
• "Looks forward to the next 50 years of United States achievements in the peaceful use of space to benefit all mankind."

Background

According to the resolution's findings, April 1, 2010, is the 50th anniversary of the launch by the United States of the Television Infrared Observation Satellite (TIROS I), the first weather observation satellite, that was capable of taking television images on command and remotely at locations around the world, and either recording the pictures as television signals for subsequent playback or transmitting the images to ground stations in real time.