H.Res. 109: Supporting the mission and goals of 2009 National Crime Victims' Rights week to increase public awareness of the rights, needs, and concerns of victims and survivors of crime in the United States, and to commemorate the 25th anniversary of the enactment o

H.Res. 109

Supporting the mission and goals of 2009 National Crime Victims' Rights week to increase public awareness of the rights, needs, and concerns of victims and survivors of crime in the United States, and to commemorate the 25th anniversary of the enactment o

Sponsor
Rep. Jim Costa

Date
April 28, 2009 (111th Congress, 1st Session)

Staff Contact
Sarah Makin

Floor Situation

H.Res. 109 is being considered on the floor under suspension of the rules, requiring a two-thirds majority vote for passage. This legislation was introduced by Rep. Jim Costa (D-CA) on February 3, 2009. 

Bill Summary

H.Res. 109 resolves that the House of Representatives:

•  "supports the mission and goals of 2009 National Crime Victims' Rights Week to increase public awareness of the impact of crime on victims and survivors, and of the constitutional and statutory rights and needs;

•  "recognizes the 25th anniversary of the enactment of the Victims of Crime Act of 1984; and

•  "directs the Clerk of the House of Representatives to transmit an enrolled copy of this resolution to the Office for Victims of Crime within the Office of Justice Programs of the Department of Justice."

 

 

Background

This resolution supports the mission and goals of 2009 National Crime Victims' Rights week to increase public awareness of the rights, needs, and concerns of victims and survivors of crime in the United States, and to commemorate the 25th anniversary of the enactment of the Victims of Crime Act of 1984.  The Victims of Crime Act of 1984 (VOCA) was an attempt by the federal government to help the victims of criminal actions through means other than punishment of the criminal.  It created a federal victims-compensation account funded by fines assessed in federal criminal convictions, and it established provisions to assist state programs that compensated the victims of crimes.  The compensation system is still in existence, having distributed over $1 billion in funds since it began.