H.R. 6364 Senamend: Concur in the Senate Amendment to H.R. 6364, the Frank Buckles World War I Memorial Act

H.R. 6364

Concur in the Senate Amendment to H.R. 6364, the Frank Buckles World War I Memorial Act

Sponsor
Sen. Bernard Sanders

Date
December 31, 2012 (112th Congress, 2nd Session)

Staff Contact
Communications

Floor Situation

On Monday, December 31, 2012, the House is scheduled to consider the Senate Amendment to H.R. 6364, the Frank Buckles World War I Memorial Act. The House passed H.R. 6364 by voice vote on December 12, 2012. The Senate passed the bill with an amendment on December 21, 2012 by unanimous consent.

Bill Summary

As amended by the Senate, the legislation would establish the World War I Centennial Commission to:

(1) Plan, develop, and execute programs, projects, and activities to commemorate the centennial of World War I;

(2) Encourage private organizations and state and local governments to organize and participate in such activities;

(3) Facilitate and coordinate such activities throughout the United States;

(4) Serve as a clearinghouse for the collection and dissemination of information about centennial events and plans; and

(5) Develop recommendations for Congress and the President for commemorating the centennial of World War I.

The Senate amendment struck the designation of the National WWI Museum and Memorial in Kansas City, MO, and the removed provisions of the House-passed bill that would have established the National WWI Memorial in Washington DC.

 

Background

H.R. 6364 would create a 12 member commission that would be charged with organizing activities to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the war. The commissioners would serve without pay and federal funds are prohibited for any project authorized by the legislation.

Cost

According to CBO, H.R. 6364 would cost about $4 million over the 2013-2017 period, subject to appropriation of the necessary amounts. Those funds would be used to plan, develop, and carry out activities and to prepare reports. Enacting H.R. 6364 would affect direct spending because it would authorize the commission to accept and spend monetary gifts, and the World War I Foundation would be required to provide funds to maintain the memorial authorized for Washington, D.C.  Therefore, pay-as-you-go procedures apply. However, CBO estimates that the net effect on direct spending would be insignificant. Enacting H.R. 6364 would not affect revenues.