H.R. 6323, To name the Department of Veterans Affairs health care system in Long Beach, California, the "Tibor Rubin VA Medical Center".

H.R. 6323

To name the Department of Veterans Affairs health care system in Long Beach, California, the "Tibor Rubin VA Medical Center"

Sponsor
Rep. Alan Lowenthal

Date
November 29, 2016 (114th Congress, 2nd Session)

Staff Contact
John Huston

Floor Situation

On­­­­ Tuesday, November 29, 2016, the House will consider H.R.6323, To name the Department of Veterans Affairs health care system in Long Beach, California, the “Tibor Rubin VA Medical Center”., under suspension of the rules. H.R. 6323 was introduced on November 15, 2016, by Rep. Alan Lowenthal (D-CA) and was referred to the Committee on Veterans’ Affairs.

Bill Summary

H.R. 6323 designates the Department of Veterans Affairs health care system located at 5901 East 7th Street, Long Beach, California, as the “Tibor Rubin VA Medical Center.”

Background

Corporal Tibor Rubin served in the Army 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, during the Korean War. He was held as a prisoner of war in for 30 months in North Korea.[1]

He was born on June 18, 1929, in Paszto, a Hungarian shtetl with a reported 120 Jewish families, to Ferenc and Rosa Rubin; his father, who had served in the Hungarian Army during World War I and spent several years as a prisoner of war in Russia, worked in a shoe store.

During WWII, his father was moved to Auschwitz and later to Buchenwald where he died. Ted’s uncle was also a POW. His mother, Rosa and 10 year-old sister, Elonja died in a gas chamber in Auschwitz, Germany. His older brother, Mike Lesak fought with the English and Czech in World War II. Ted is a survivor of 14 months in the Mauthausen concentration camp in Austria. Liberated by the U.S. Army, he credits Army medics for saving the lives of survivors. He notes, “I thank God that I came to the United States.”

Corporal Rubin received the Medal of Honor during a White House ceremony on September 23, 2005 for his service in the Korean War.[2] During the ceremony President Bush described parts of Corporal Rubin heroic efforts during the war:

“When Corporal Rubin’s battalion found itself ambushed by thousands of Chinese troops. The Americans’ firepower soon dwindled to a single machine gun. The weapon was in an exposed position and three soldiers had already died manning it. That was when Corporal Rubin stepped forward. He fought until his ammunition was gone. He was badly wounded, captured and sent to a P.O.W. camp.”[3]

Corporal Rubin died at the age of 86 on December 5, 2015 in Garden Grove, California.

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[1] See Army Website, Corporal Tibor Rubin Medal Of Honor | Korean War
[2] See NY Times Article, “Tibor Rubin Is Dead at 86; Medal of Honor Was Delayed by Anti-Semitism,” December 8, 2015.
[3] Id.

Cost

A Congressional Budget Office (CBO) estimate for this bill is currently unavailable.

Additional Information

For questions or further information please contact John Huston with the House Republican Policy Committee by email or at 6-5539.