H.R. 6135, To designate the federal building and United States courthouse located at 719 Church Street in Nashville, Tennessee as the “Fred D. Thompson Federal Building and United States Courthouse”

H.R. 6135

To designate the federal building and United States courthouse located at 719 Church Street in Nashville, Tennessee as the “Fred D. Thompson Federal Building and United States Courthouse”

Date
November 29, 2016 (114th Congress, 2nd Session)

Staff Contact
Communications

Floor Situation

On­­­­ Tuesday, November 29, 2016, the House will consider H.R. 6135, to designate the federal building and United States courthouse located at 719 Church Street in Nashville, Tennessee as the “Fred D. Thompson Federal Building and United States Courthouse”, under suspension of the rules. H.R. 6135 was introduced on September 22, 2016, by Rep. Marsha Blackburn (R-TN) and was referred to the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.

Bill Summary

H.R. 6135 designates the federal building and United States courthouse located at 719 Church Street in Nashville, Tennessee as the “Fred D. Thompson Federal Building and United States Courthouse.”

Background

Fred D. Thompson was born in 1942, in Sheffield, Alabama and grew up in Lawrenceburg, Tennessee. He received a bachelor’s degree in philosophy and political science from Memphis State University in 1964 and earned a law degree from Vanderbilt University in Nashville in 1967.

Early in his career, he served as an assistant U.S. attorney and, in 1973, was appointed as minority counsel with the Senate Select Committee on Presidential Campaign Activities (the “Watergate” Committee).  During a televised hearing of the Committee, it was Thompson who asked White House aide Alexander Butterfield about the existence of tapes made of Oval Office conversations. Those tapes would eventually lead to Nixon’s resignation.

In 1974, Thompson returned to the private practice of law in Nashville where he represented the former chairperson of the state parole board, who became a whistleblower in a scheme of bribes for parole.  In 1985, this case was made into the film, Marie, and Thompson was asked to play himself, launching a career in acting.

In 1994, Thompson sought political office for the first time. He ran to fill the remaining two years of Vice President Al Gore’s U.S. Senate term from Tennessee. He was re-elected in 1996 to a full six-year term. In 2002, Thompson chose not to run for re-election and returned to his acting career, taking on the role of New York District Attorney Arthur Branch on the television series Law & Order. He stayed with the show until 2007 when he announced his bid for the U.S. presidency. He officially withdrew his candidacy for President of the United States in January of 2008.

In April 2007, Fred Thompson disclosed that in 2004, he was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin lymphoma, a cancer of the immune system. On November 1, 2015 Thompson died from a recurrence of lymphoma. He was 73.

Cost

A Congressional Budget Office (CBO) estimate for this bill is currently unavailable.

Additional Information

For questions or further information please contact Jake Vreeburg with the House Republican Policy Committee by email or at 6-1828.