H.R. 5470: To exclude an external power supply for certain security or life safety alarms and surveillance system components from the application of certain energy efficiency standards under the Energy Policy and Conservation Act

H.R. 5470

To exclude an external power supply for certain security or life safety alarms and surveillance system components from the application of certain energy efficiency standards under the Energy Policy and Conservation Act

Sponsor
Rep. Frank Pallone Jr.

Date
December 8, 2010 (111th Congress, 2nd Session)

Staff Contact
Communications

Floor Situation

H.R. 5470 is expected to be considered on the floor of the House on Wednesday, December 8, 2010, under a motion to suspend the rules, requiring a two-thirds majority vote for passage.  The legislation was introduced on May 28, 2010 by Rep. Frank Pallone (D-NJ). 

Bill Summary

H.R. 5470 would exclude an external power supply for certain security or life-safety alarms and surveillance system components from certain energy efficiency standards under current law.

Specifically, the bill’s exemptions would apply to equipment used to monitor, detect, or provide notification of intrusion or access to property or physical assets or notification of threats to life safety; equipment to deter or control access to property or assets, or prevent theft; or equipment to monitor, detect, or provide notification of fire, gas, smoke, or flooding threats to property, assets or life safety.

This exclusion would not apply to equipment with a principal function other than life safety, security, or surveillance that is designed and marketed with a built-in alarm or theft-deterrent feature.  The exclusion also would not apply to equipment with a principal function other than life safety, security or surveillance that does not operate necessarily and continuously in active mode.

The "no-load" mode energy-efficiency standards would additionally exclude an external power supply manufactured before July 2017 and that is an AC-to-AC external power supply or has an output of 20 watts , is certified to the Department as being designed to be connected to a security or safety alarm or system component, and is marked with the distinguishing mark on establishment within the External Power Supply International Efficiency Marking Protocol.

The bill would direct the Department of Energy (DOE) to require, with safeguards for the protection of confidential business information, the submission of unit shipment data on an annual basis.  The DOE also would be required to restrict the eligibility of external power supplies for the exemption on a finding that a substantial number of the external power supplies are being marketed to or installed in applications other than security or life-safety alarm or surveillance systems.

Background

The 2007 Energy Independence and Security Act (P.L. 110-240) requires electronic devices to meet certain efficiency standards while in "no-load" mode.  The requirements apply to security and life-safety devices even though they are always in "active" mode.

Electronic power supplies used in such security and life-safety systems can never be operated in a "no-load" mode or "off" mode because disconnecting them from the load destroys the intended functionality and integrity of the system.  Fire and carbon monoxide monitors, intrusion detection sensors and access control readers are examples of such devices that require a constant supply of energy.

Cost

The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) has not produced a cost estimate as of press time.