H.R. 5293, Department of Defense Appropriations Act, 2017

H.R. 5293

Department of Defense Appropriations Act, 2017

Committee
Appropriations

Date
June 14, 2016 (114th Congress, 2nd Session)

Staff Contact
Communications

Floor Situation

On Tuesday, June 14, 2016, the House will begin consideration of H.R. 5293, the Department of Defense Appropriations Act, 2017, under a general debate rule. H.R. 5293 was introduced on May 19, 2016, by Rep. Rodney Frelinghuysen (R-NJ) and was ordered reported by the Committee on Appropriations by voice vote, as amended, on May 19, 2016.

Bill Summary

H.R. 5293 provides $575.8 billion in total discretionary budget authority for the Department of Defense for fiscal year (FY) 2017. The bill provides $517.13 billion for the Department of Defense base budget, which is an increase of $3 billion above FY16 levels and a decrease of $586.38 million below the budget request, and $58.63 billion for the Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO) account to support the Global War on Terrorism (GWOT), which is an increase of $449 thousand above the budget request.[1] Of the OCO funding, $15.7 billion is made available to meet critical base readiness, modernization, and recapitalization needs not addressed by the request.

Funding in support of the GWOT “will provide the needed resources for the preparation and operation in the field to fight ongoing threats, including funding for personnel requirements, operational needs, the purchase of new aircraft to replace combat losses, combat vehicle safety modifications, additional Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) assets, and maintenance of facilities and equipment. It also provides critical support to our key allies, such as Israel, Ukraine and Jordan, to resist aggression.”[2]

The major provisions of the bill are as follows:

Title I—Military Personnel

Title I provides $128.2 billion for active, reserve, and National Guard military personnel, a decrease of $733.9 million below the budget request and a decrease of $1.06 billion below the FY 2016 enacted level. The Title provides funding to increase basic pay for all military personnel by 2.1 percent, as authorized by the House-passed National Defense Authorization Act, effective January 1, 2017.[3] The Title authorizes resources for an additional 28,715 active forces and 25,000 Selected Reserve forces above the requested end-strength levels in order to meet operational needs in FY17.[4] Funds for these additional troops are provided in Base Requirements funded from Title IX.

Title II—Operation and Maintenance

Title II provides a total of $173.7 billion for operation and maintenance support to the Military Services and other Department of Defense entities, an increase of $2.4 billion above the budget request and an increase of $6.2 billion above the FY 2016 enacted level.[5] An additional $35.5 billion is provided in Title IX to support our troops overseas through the end of April 2017.

Title III—Procurement

Title III provides for a total of $104.2 billion for procurement. In Title IX, the Committee recommends a total of $7.3 billion for additional base requirements.[6]  Major initiatives and modifications include:

  • $881 million for the remanufacture of 52 AH–64 Apache helicopters, and $374 million for the procurement of 10 AH-64 Apache helicopters
  • $1.2 billion for the procurement of 72 UH–60 Blackhawk helicopters
  • $689 million for the procurement of 27 CH–47 Chinook helicopters
  • $788.6 million for the procurement of 29 UH–1Y/AH–1Z helicopters
  • $423 million for the procurement of 85 MSE missiles for the Patriot missile system
  • $541.6 million the procurement of WIN–T Ground Forces Tactical Networks
  • $131 million for the procurement of 20 UH–72A Lakota helicopters
  • $439.8 million for the procurement of 123 Stryker vehicle upgrades
  • $250.4 million for the procurement of 12 MQ-1 Gray Eagle unmanned aerial vehicles
  • $1.35 billion for the procurement of 16 F/A-18E/F Super Hornet aircraft
  • $1.82 billion for the procurement of 11 P-8A Poseidon multi-mission aircraft
  • $805.6 million for the procurement of 26 UH-1Y/AH-1Z helicopters
  • $8.32 billion for the procurement of 74 F-35 Lightning aircraft
  • $21.6 billion for the procurement of 15 Navy ships, including 2 DDG-51 guided missile destroyers, two fully funded SSN-774 attack submarines, three Littoral Combat Ships, one moored training ship, one LHA replacement, one amphibious ship replacement, and five ship to shore connectors
  • $773 million for the initial procurement of the Ohio Replacement Submarine
  • $1.96 billion for the procurement of 24 C/HC/MC/KC–130J aircraft
  • $1.6 billion for the procurement of 21 MV/CV–22 aircraft
  • $453 million for the procurement of 24 MQ–9 Reaper unmanned aerial vehicles
  • $2.8 billion for the procurement of 15 KC–46 tanker aircraft
  • $1.02 billion for the procurement of 3 Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicles
  • $332 million for the Israeli Cooperative Programs under the Missile Defense Agency

Title IV—Research, Development, Test and Evaluation

Title IV provides a total of $70.3 billion for research, development, test and evaluation. In Title IX of the bill, the Committee recommends a total of $163 million for additional base requirements. [7]  Major initiatives and modifications include:

  • $700.8 million for the continued developed of the replacement for the Ohio-class ballistic missile submarine
  • $311.9 million for the continued development of the E-1D Advanced Hawkeye aircraft
  • $545.8 million for the continued development of the Next Generation Jammer
  • $1.79 billion for the continued development of the F-35 Lightning Joint Strike Fighter aircraft
  • $338 million for the continued development of the replacement for the Presidential helicopter program
  • $1.36 billion for the continued development of a new penetrating bomber
  • $128 million for the development of a Next Generation JSTARS aircraft
  • $351 million for the development of a Presidential Aircraft replacement
  • $304 million for the continued development of a new combat rescue helicopter
  • $162 million for the continued development of the Space Based Infrared Satellite and associate ground support systems
  • $393 million for the continued development of the Global Positioning System III operational control segment
  • $141.8 million for the continued development of the Global Positioning System III space segment
  • $296.5 million for the development of an alternative rocket engine for space launch
  • $2.92 billion for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency
  • $268.7 million for the Israeli Cooperative Program under the Missile Defense Agency

Title V—Revolving and Management Funds

Title V provides $1.37 billion for the Defense Working Capital Funds accounts and $474.2 million for the National Defense Sealift Fund.[8]

Title VI—Other Department of Defense Programs

Title VI provides a total of $33.57 billion for the Defense Health Program to support worldwide medical and dental services for active forces and other eligible beneficiaries. The Title recommends funding above the request for enduring traumatic brain injury, psychological health, and wounded, ill and injured requirements.

The Title provides for:

  • $125 million for traumatic brain injury and psychological health research
  • $30 million for peer-reviewed spinal cord research
  • $30 million for peer-reviewed orthopedic research
  • $551 million for Chemical Agents and Munitions Destruction
  • $908.8 million for Drug Interdiction and Counter drug activities
  • $322 million for the Office of the Inspector General

The bill provides no funding for the Joint Operational Needs Fund, which is $99.7 million below the budget request.[9]

Title VII—Related Agencies

Title VII provides for $514 million for continuing the operation of the Central Intelligence Agency Retirement and Disability System Fund. The Title also provides for $483.6 for the Intelligence Community Management Account.

Title VIII—General Provisions

Title VIII includes, among others, the following general provisions:

  • Section 8012 provides that civilian personnel of the Department of Defense may not be managed on the basis of end strength or be subject to end strength limitations.[10]
  • Section 8037 requires the Department of Defense to comply with the Buy American Act.[11]
  • Section 8043 prohibits funding from being obligated or expended for assistance to the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (North Korea) unless specifically appropriated for that purpose.[12]
  • Section 8058 provides for a waiver of ‘‘Buy America’’ provisions for certain cooperative programs.[13]
  • Section 8068 provides funding and transfer authority for the Israeli Cooperative Programs.[14]
  • Section 8097 prohibits funding to transfer or release any individual detained at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba into the United States, its territories, or possessions.[15]
  • Section 8098 prohibits funding to modify any United States facility (other than the facility at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba) to house any individual detained at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. This language is identical to language enacted in Public Law 112–74.[16]
  • Section 8099 prohibits funding to transfer any individual detained at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, to a country of origin or other foreign country or entity unless the Secretary of Defense makes certain certifications.[17]
  • Section 8100 prohibits funding from being used to violate the War Powers Resolution Act.[18]
  • Section 8108 prohibits the use of funds by the National Security Agency targeting U.S. persons under authorities granted in the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act.[19]
  • Section 8113 prohibits the use of funds to retire the A–10 aircraft.[20]
  • Section 8130 prohibits the use of funds to close facilities at Naval Station Guantanamo Bay.[21]
  • Section 8131 provides for the transfer of funds to pay for military personnel for purposes of fully funding the authorized military pay raise.[22]
  • Section 8133 provides for the use of funds to research and respond to the Zika virus.[23]

Title IX—Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO)

Title IX provides $58.63 billion for Global War on Terrorism operations or the OCO fund. Of those funds, the Committee recommends:

  • $500 million to continue support for the Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance Fund[24]
  • $4.4 billion be made available for military personnel[25]
  • $35.54 billion for operation and maintenance[26]
  • $150 million to provide assistance to the national security forces of Ukraine
  • $750 million for the Counterterrorism Partnerships Fund
  • $3.45 billion for the Afghanistan Security Forces Fund
  • $880 million for the Counter-Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant Train and Equip Fund
  • $16.6 billion for procurement[27]
  • $1 billion for National Guard and Reserve Equipment
  • $496.7 million for research, development, test, and evaluation[28]
  • $140 million for the Defense Working Capital Funds[29]
  • $781.7 million for the Defense Health Program[30]
  • $215.3 million for Drug Interdiction and Counter-Drug Activities Defense[31]
  • $408.3 million for Joint Improvised Explosive Device Defeat Fund[32]
  • $22 million for the Office of the Inspector General[33]

Title X—General Provisions

Section 10001 expresses the sense of Congress regarding the use of military force against the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant.[34]

Classified Annex

The bill also provides funding for certain classified programs. These funding levels are made available for review to Members in a classified annex.

———————
[1] See House Report 114-577 at 3.
[2] See Press Release—“House Appropriations Committee Releases Fiscal Year 2017 Defense Bill,” May 10, 2016.
[3] See House Report 114-577 at 4.
[4] Id.
[5] Id.at 5.
[6] Id.
[7] Id. at 6.
[8] Id. at 267
[9] Id. at 281.
[10] Id. at 285.
[11] Id. at 287.
[12] Id. at 288.
[13] Id. at 289.
[14] Id.
[15] Id. at 291.
[16] Id. at 292.
[17] Id.
[18] Id.
[19] Id.
[20] Id.
[21] Id. at 293.
[22] Id.
[23] Id.
[24] Id. at 295.
[25] Id. at 297.
[26] Id. at 304; 318.
[27] Id. at 318.
[28] Id. at 334.
[29] Id. at 339
[30] Id.
[31] Id. at 340
[32] Id.
[33] Id.
[34] Id. at 7.

Background

The Department of Defense Appropriations Act has historically been the key mechanism through which Congress funds one of its primary responsibilities as mandated in Article I, Section 8 of the Constitution of the United States, which grants Congress the power to provide for the common defense; to raise and support an Army; to provide and maintain a Navy; and to make rules for the government and regulation of the land and naval forces.

According to Chairman Rogers, “Protecting our nation from threats to our freedom, democracy, and way of life is the most important responsibility of Congress. The U.S. and our allies continue to face attacks and threats from terrorist organizations like ISIL, and our troops must be ready to fight at all times, against any enemy.”[1]

—————
[1] See Press Release—“House Appropriations Committee Releases Fiscal Year 2017 Defense Bill” May 10, 2016.

Cost

If enacted, H.R. 5293 would result in discretionary budget authority of $575.8 billion.

 

Amendments

  1. Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee (D-TX) – This amendment increases funding for Military Personnel, Navy by $2 million and to reduce the amount made available for the same account, by $2 million
  2. Rep. Bill Shuster (R-PA) – This amendment restores 170 million to Army Operations & Maintenance (O&M) for the purpose of preventing a cut to depots and the Organic Industrial Base (OIB), offset with funds from Operations & Maintenance Defense-Wide and non-critical environmental restoration accounts.
  3. Rep. Lujan Grisham (D-NM) – This amendment increases funding for Air Force Research, Development, Test and Evaluation by $7 million to support the development of beam directors and adaptive optics, including deformable mirrors and high efficiency and high temperature diodes, that provide enabling technology for the development of high energy laser weapon systems. Decreases funding in the Operations and Maintenance for the Army by $1 million, decreases funding in the Operations and Maintenance for the Navy by $3 million, and decreases funding in the Operations and Maintenance for the Air Force by $3 million.
  4. Rep. Vicky Hartzler (R-MO) – This amendment increases funding for Army Ammunition Procurement by $20,000,000 and decreases funding for operation and maintenance activities conducted by Department of Defense agencies by the same amount.
  5. Rep. Patrick Meehan (R-PA) – This amendment reduces and then increase, the amount in the Operations and Maintenance Defense-Wide fund by $7,000,000 to offer health screenings in communities near formerly used defense sites with contaminated groundwater.
  6. Rep. Erik Paulsen (R-MN) – This amendment increases funding for Defense Production Act purchases by $25 million for Strategic Radiation Hardened Microelectronics Trusted Foundry Sustainment and decreases funding for operation and maintenance activities conducted by Department of Defense agencies by the same amount.
  7. Rep. Tom Rooney (R-FL) – This amendment restores TRICARE reimbursement rates for Applied Behavior Analysis under the Comprehensive Autism Demonstration and decreases funding for operation and maintenance activities conducted by Department of Defense agencies by $40 million.
  8. Rep. Ryan Zinke (R-MT) – This amendment appropriates $80,000,000 for the UH-1N Replacement Program, offset with $50,000,000 from the Office of the Secretary of Defense and $30,000,000 from the Washington Headquarters’ Services accounts.
  9. Rep. Keith Ellison (D-MN) – This amendment reprograms already appropriated funds to create an Office of Good Jobs for the Department of Defense.
  10. Rep. Chris Gibson (R-NY) – This amendment reduces the Aerostat Joint Project Office funding by $1 million and increases the Weapons and Munitions Advanced Technology funding for extended range cannon artillery by $1 million.
  11. Rep. Jim Langevin (D-RI) – This amendment appropriates $29,800,000 to Navy programs for the development and demonstration of advanced technologies, including high energy lasers and the Electromagnetic Railgun for naval weapon systems
  12. Rep. Mike Rogers (R-AL) – This amendment adds additional funding for directed energy and other research and development at the Missile Defense Agency.
  13. Rep. Mike Quigley (D-IL) – This amendment decreases funding for the Long Range Standoff Weapon by $75,802,000 and increases the spending reduction account by the same amount.
  14. Rep. Randy Forbes (R-VA) – This amendment strikes Sec. 8055, which prohibits the Department of Defense from modifying the command and control relationships between U.S. Fleet Forces Command and the U.S. Pacific Fleet.
  15. Rep. Jerrold Nadler (D-NY) – This amendment strikes sections 8097 and 8098 related to the detention facility at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
  16. Rep. Beto O’Rourke (D-TX) – This amendment strikes Section 8121, which prevents the use of funds for proposing, planning, or executing a new Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) round.
  17. Rep. Jared Huffman (D-CA) – This amendment strikes Section 8127, which requires the Air Force to utilize specific energy sourced domestically within the United States as the base load energy for heating at U.S. defense installations in Kaiserslautern, Germany.
  18. Rep. Scott Peters (D-CA) – This amendment strikes the prohibition of funds to enforce section 526 that restricts Federal Agencies from entering into contracts to buy alternative fuels that are more polluting than conventional fuels.
  19. Rep. Ted Poe (R-TX) – This amendment cuts funding to Pakistan from $900 million to $700 million.
  20. Rep. Jimmy Duncan (R-TN) – This amendment reduces the funding level for the Afghanistan Security Forces Fund of $3,448,715,000 by $448,715,000 to $3,000,000,000 and transfers that money for deficit reduction.
  21. Rep. Mark Sanford (R-SC) – This amendment ensures that the Department of Defense retains its statutory authority to provide new military recruits a small cash voucher that they can use to purchase running shoes for training.
  22. Rep. Ken Buck (R-CO) – This amendment prohibits funds to implement Department of Defense (DOD) Directive 4715.21 on Climate Change Adaption and Resilience, requiring the Pentagon to prioritize climate change over national security.
  23. Rep. Ken Buck (R-CO) – This amendment prevents DOD from partnering with private organizations to create or expand national heritage asset areas in southeast Colorado.
  24. Rep. Bradley Byrne (R-AL) – This amendment prohibits funds to be used to modify a military installation in the United States, including construction or modification of a facility on a military installation, to provide temporary housing for unaccompanied alien children.
  25. Rep. Steve King (R-IA) – This amendment ensures no funds are used by the Department of Defense to carry out or in response to the memorandum of the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Homeland Defense Integration and Defense Support of Civil Authorities titled “Memorandum for Secretaries of the Military Departments Director, Joint Staff” and dated November 25, 2015.
  26. Rep. Paul Gosar (R-AZ) – This amendment prohibits funds from being used by this Act to enlist DACA aliens in the military, who are currently only considered eligible through the MAVNI program as a result of a September 2014 memo from the administration.
  27. Rep. Steve King (R-IA) – This amendment ensures no funds are used by the Department of Defense to enlist DACA youth in the United States military.
  28. Rep. Richard Hudson (R-NC) – This amendment states no funds in this act may be used to transfer a detainee at Guantanamo Bay to any other location.
  29. Rep. Doug Lamborn (R-CO) – This amendment prohibits the use of funds to survey, assess, or review potential detention locations in the United States to detain any individual presently detained at United States Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
  30. Rep. Thomas Massie (R-KY) – This amendment blocks funding for DOD drug interdiction and counterdrug activities in Afghanistan.
  31. Rep. Thomas Massie (R-KY) – This amendment prohibits warrantless searches of government databases for the communications of U.S. persons and prohibits government agencies from mandating data security vulnerabilities in products or services for surveillance purposes.
  32. Rep. Tom McClintock (R-CA) – This amendment prohibits the Department of Defense from obligating or expending funds on certain green energy mandates found in various provisions of US Code and two Executive Orders.
  33. Rep. Mick Mulvaney (R-SC) – This amendment prohibits Overseas Contingency Operation funds found in Title IX from being used for anything other than a Contingency Operation as defined by United States Code.
  34. Rep. Mike Pompeo (R-KS) – This amendment prohibits funds for any salaries or expenses for the offices of the Special Envoy for Guantanamo Detention Closure or the Principal Director, Detainee Policy.
  35. Rep. Dave Reichert (R-WA) – This amendment ensures no funds shall be used to implement President Obama’s Executive Order 13688 limiting the donation of surplus federal equipment to state and local law enforcement as part of the DOD’s Excess Property Program (1033 program).
  36. Rep. Dana Rohrabacher (R-CA) – This amendment prohibits funds in the bill from being used to provide assistance to Pakistan.
  37. Rep. Tim Walberg (R-MI) – This amendment prohibits funds from being used by the Secretary of Defense to obligate or expend funds on Afghanistan Infrastructure Fund projects.
  38. Rep. Don Beyer (D-VA) – This amendment prohibits Department of Defense funds from being used to for a public-private competition under the OMB Circular A-76, for work performed by DOD employees.
  39. Rep. Matt Cartwright (D-PA) – This amendment requires that no funds be used to plan for, begin, continue, complete, process, or approve a public-private competition under the Office of Management and Budget Circular A-76.
  40. Rep. John Conyers (D-MI) – This amendment blocks funds from being used to transfer or authorize the transfer of cluster munitions to Saudi Arabia.
  41. Rep. Ted Yoho (R-FL) – This amendment blocks funds from being used to engage in hostilities in Libya in contravention of the War Powers Resolution.
  42. Rep. Tulsi Gabbard (D-HI) – This amendment prohibits funds appropriated under this act from being used to fund assistance authorized by Section 1209 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2015, which deals with the authority to provide assistance to the vetted Syrian opposition.
  43. Rep. Alan Grayson (D-FL) – This amendment prohibits the intelligence community from subverting or interfering with the integrity of any cryptographic standard that is proposed, developed, or adopted by the National Institute of Standards and Technology Act.
  44. Rep. Jim McGovern (D-MA) – This amendment states no funds may be obligated or spent for combat operations in Iraq or Syria unless an AUMF is enacted.
  45. Rep. Barbara Lee (D-CA) – This amendment prohibits funding for the 2001 AUMF beginning on April 30, 2017.
  46. Rep. Jared Polis (D-CO) – This amendment reduces the total amount appropriated by 1% excluding military personnel and the Defense Health Program account.
  47. Rep. Martha McSally (R-AZ) – This amendment Appropriates wing upgrades authorized for the A-10 and moves money from within the Air Force Aircraft Procurement OCO account to the A-10 wing upgrade.
  48. Rep. Martha McSally (R-AZ) – This amendment limits the Defense Department from using money to have musical military units perform in an official capacity for certain entertainment purposes in 10 USC 974, including dinners, dances, and social events.
  49. Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee (D-TX) – This amendment reduces funding for Environmental Restoration Army, by $1 million and increases funding for Defense Health Care for PTSD by a similar amount.
  50. Rep. Alan Lowenthal (D-CA) – This amendment increases the STARBASE fifth grade youth STEM education program found in Operations and Maintenance, Defense-Wide, Civil Military Programs by $5 million, and to reduce Operations and Maintenance, Army, Other Service wide Activities (042G) by the offsetting amount.
  51. Rep. Mike Coffman (R-CO) – This amendment requests a transfer of $6.086 million from within the Navy’s fiscal year 2017 Operations & Maintenance (O&M) account, to increase funding for the Weapons Support, Fleet Ballistic Missiles, Project 934, Engineering and Technical Services sub-account managed by the Navy’s Strategic Systems Program office.
  52. Rep. Sean Duffy (R-WI) – This amendment reduces and then increases the amount in the Operations and Maintenance Defense-Wide fund by $1,000,000. This is the account that pays for the Student Transportation Security Services Program.
  53. Rep. David McKinley (R-WV) – This amendment increases funding for the National Guard Youth Challenge Program (NGYCP) under Civil Military Programs by $5 million and decrease by the same amount Operations and Maintenance, Defense-Wide.
  54. Rep. Pete Aguilar (D-CA) – This amendment appropriates $5 million for the Information Assurance Scholarship Program (IASP); a DoD program designed to address our cyber personnel demands through the recruitment and retention of top IT/Cybersecurity talent. Offset by a reduction of $5 million in the Operations and Maintenance Defense-Wide fund.
  55. Rep. Jerrold Nadler (D-NY) – This amendment increases funding by $10 million for Israeli Cooperative Programs (procurement of the Iron Dome defense system) and offsets by reducing by $10 million the Operation and Maintenance, Defense-Wide account.
  56. Rep. Kristi Noem (R-SD) – This amendment increases Aircraft Procurement, Air Force by $7 million intended for B-1 Bomber modifications and decreases Operation and Maintenance, Defense-Wide by $7 million.
  57. Rep. Robert Aderholt (R-AL) – This amendment reduces Defense Wide Operation and Maintenance funding by $17,000,000, and increases Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, Army funding by $17,000,000.
  58. Rep. Alan Grayson (D-FL) – This amendment increases the Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, Army account by $5 million and offsets it by reducing $5 million from Operation and Maintenance, Defense-wide account.
  59. Rep. Ami Bera (D-CA) – This amendment increases funding for the Defense Advanced research projects Agency by $5 million, offset with a reduction from Operation and Maintenance.
  60. Rep. Alan Grayson (D-FL) – This amendment increases funding for prostate cancer research under the Defense Health Program by $5 million. Offset by a reduction of $5 million in the Operations and Maintenance Defense-Wide fund.
  61. Rep. Alan Grayson (D-FL) – This amendment increases funding for Gulf War illness research under the Defense Health Program by $1 million. Offset by a reduction of $1 million in the Operations and Maintenance Defense-Wide fund.
  62. Rep. Vicky Hartzler (R-MO) – This amendment increases Defense Health Program Funding by $5,000,000. Offset by a reduction of $5 million in the Operations and Maintenance Defense-Wide fund.
  63. Rep. Grace Meng (D-NY) – This amendment moves $8 million from the Operation and Maintenance, Defense-Wide account to the Peer-Reviewed Cancer Research Program in order to make funding for brain cancer, colorectal cancer, listeria-based regimens for cancer, liver cancer, melanoma, mesothelioma, pancreatic cancer, and stomach cancer consistent with the funding levels in the FY17 Senate DOD appropriations bill. Offset by a reduction of $8 million in the Operations and Maintenance Defense-Wide fund.
  64. Rep. Rick Nolan (D-MN) – This amendment provides an additional $2 million for the Department of Defense’s Lung Cancer Research Program and decreases the Operation and Maintenance, Defense-wide account by the same amount.
  65. Rep. John Delaney (D-MD) – This amendment provides for an additional $5 million for the Fisher House Foundation which is offset by an outlay neutral reduction in the Operation and Maintenance, Defense-wide account.
  66. Rep. Michael Fitzpatrick (R-PA) – This amendment increases funding for the Tuberous Sclerosis Complex Research Program (TSCRP) at the Department of Defense (DoD) in the fiscal year 2017 Defense Appropriations Act by $2 million. Offset by a reduction of $2 million in the Operations and Maintenance Defense-Wide fund.
  67. Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee (D-TX) – This amendment reduces funding for Procurement, Defense-Wide, by $10 million and increases funding for Defense Health Programs by a similar amount in order to address breast cancer research.
  68. Rep. Tom MacArthur (R-NJ) – This amendment funds US-Israel Cooperative Directed Energy missile defense research, development, testing, evaluation, and procurement at $25 million and reduces Missile Defense Agency Headquarters by $25 million.
  69. Rep. Rick Larsen (D-WA) – This amendment reduces and then increases Navy RDT&E by $2 million to support F/A-18 squadron noise reduction programs.
  70. Rep. Tulsi Gabbard (D-HI) – This amendment increases the Ballistic Missile Defense Sensors RDT&E Defense-Wide account by $5 million, with offset from Air Force RDT&E, to fund missile defense requirement for the Asia Pacific.
  71. Rep. Tim Walberg (R-MI) – This amendment prohibits funds to be used for implementing the Department of Labor Office of Federal Contract Compliance Program’s Directive 293, dealing with coverage of Health Care Providers and Insurers.
  72. Rep. Alan Grayson (D-FL) – This amendment prohibits DOD from entering into a contract with an entity that discloses, as it is required to by the Federal Acquisition Regulation, that it has been convicted of fraud or another criminal offense in the last three years in connection with obtaining, attempting to obtain, or performing a public contract or subcontract. Prohibits DOD from contracting with entities that have been notified of any delinquent Federal taxes for which the liability remains unsatisfied.
  73. Rep. Ted Yoho (R-FL) – This amendment blocks funds from being used to provide weapons or training to neo-Nazi Azov Battalion in Ukraine.
  74. Rep. Lou Barletta (R-PA) – This amendment prohibits funding from being used to enter into contracts for the procurement of energy or fuel for military instillations if such energy or fuel originates from the Russian Federation.
  75. Rep. Adrian Smith (R-NE) – This amendment prohibits DOD from excluding meat from their Food Service Program Manual.

Additional Information

For questions or further information please contact Jake Vreeburg with the House Republican Policy Committee by email or at 5-0190.