H.R. 5252, To Designate the United States Customs and Border Protection Port of Entry located at 1400 Lower Island Road in Tornillo, Texas, as the "Marcelino Serna Port of Entry"

H.R. 5252

To Designate the United States Customs and Border Protection Port of Entry located at 1400 Lower Island Road in Tornillo, Texas, as the "Marcelino Serna Port of Entry"

Sponsor
Rep. Will Hurd

Committee
Ways and Means

Date
July 11, 2016 (114th Congress, 2nd Session)

Staff Contact
Jake Vreeburg

Floor Situation

On Monday, July 11, 2016, the House will consider H.R. 5252, to Designate the United States Customs and Border Protection Port of Entry located at 1400 Lower Island Road in Tornillo, Texas, as the “Marcelino Serna Port of Entry”, under suspension of the rules. H.R. 5252 was introduced on May 16, 2016, by Rep. Will Hurd (R-TX) and was referred to the Committee on Ways and Means.

Bill Summary

H.R. 5252 designates the United States Customs and Border Protection Port of Entry located at 1400 Lower Island Road in Tornillo, Texas, as the “Marcelino Serna Port of Entry”.

Background

Private Marcelino Serna was a Mexican-American soldier who volunteered for the United States Army during the First World War. After his training, he was sent to join the Allied forces in Europe. Military officers, however, soon discovered that Serna was not an American citizen, but a Mexican one. Serna was given the option to withdraw from service, but instead he chose to fight on behalf of the United States. During his time in the service he demonstrated an extraordinary sense of bravery, including singlehandedly capturing dozens of enemy soldiers.[1] Due to his extraordinary sense of bravery and honor, Private Serna was honored by the U.S. Army with two Purple Hearts and the Distinguished Service Cross, the second highest honor that a soldier can receive after the Medal of Honor. In addition to his American honors, Private Serna also received two Croix de Guerre, the highest French military honor.[2]

After the war, Serna moved to El Paso County, where he lived and worked for the rest of his life. He received his citizenship in 1924 and he retired in 1961. Pvt. Serna died on February 29, 1992, and was buried with full military honors at the Fort Bliss National Cemetery.[3]

According to the bill’s sponsor, “The Tornillo-Marcelino Serna Port of Entry will not only honor this extraordinary man’s service to our nation, it will serve as a reminder of the countless Mexican-American immigrants that have fought valiantly to keep our nation safe. Their contributions will not be ignored or forgotten.”[4]

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[1] Elena Gomez, “Marcelino Serna Became a World War I Hero.” El Paso Community College. 2004.
[2] Pew Hispanic “U.S. Latino Patriots.” Pages 9-10.
[3] Elena Gomez, “Marcelino Serna Became a World War I Hero.” El Paso Community College. 2004.
[4] Rep. Will Hurd (R-TX), “Marcelino Serna, American HeroEl Paso Times. May 29, 2016.

Cost

A Congressional Budget Office (CBO) cost estimate is currently unavailable.

Additional Information

For questions or further information please contact Jake Vreeburg with the House Republican Policy Committee by email or at 5-0190.