H.R. 4777, To designate the facility of the United States Postal Service located at 1301 Alabama Avenue in Selma, Alabama as the "Amelia Boynton Robinson Post Office Building"

H.R. 4777

To designate the facility of the United States Postal Service located at 1301 Alabama Avenue in Selma, Alabama as the "Amelia Boynton Robinson Post Office Building"

Sponsor
Rep. Terri Sewell

Date
June 21, 2016 (114th Congress, 2nd Session)

Staff Contact
Communications

Floor Situation

On Tuesday, June 21, 2016, the House will consider H.R. 4777, to designate the facility of the United States Postal Service located at 1301 Alabama Avenue in Selma, Alabama as the “Amelia Boynton Robinson Post Office Building”, under suspension of the rules. The bill was introduced on March 17, 2016, by Rep. Terri Sewell (D-AL) and was referred to the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, which ordered the bill reported by unanimous consent on May 17, 2016.

Bill Summary

H.R. 4777 designates the facility of the United States Postal Service located at 1301 Alabama Avenue in Selma, Alabama as the “Amelia Boynton Robinson Post Office Building.”

 

Background

Amelia Boynton Robinson was a leader in the Civil Rights movement and an organizer of the Selma Civil Rights March. When she participated in the “Bloody Sunday” march she was beaten by the police and left for dead. A photo of her during this march was widely published in newspapers around the world.

The Selma “Bloody Sunday” March occurred on March 7, 1965. As predominantly black protestors conducted their march they were attacked by state troopers with tear gas, clubs, dogs, and whips. The news coverage of this event was a turning point in winning popular support for the Civil Rights Movement. She stood by President Johnson’s side as he signed the Voting Rights Act, a direct outcome of the Civil Rights marches.[1]

Ms.Robinson studied at Savannah State University and the Tuskegee Institute, studying under the remarkable George Washington Carver and earning a degree in home economics. She then worked for the U.S. Department of Agriculture, giving instruction in food and nutrition to rural households in Alabama.[2]

She spent decades registering black voters despite the burdens and restrictions of the Jim Crow era. In 1964 Ms.Robinson ran for Congress, the first black person to do so since Reconstruction. Additionally, she was the first black women to run for Congress ever.[3]

To quote Ms.Robinson herself, “I wasn’t looking for notoriety, but if that’s what it took. I didn’t care how many licks I got. It just made me even more determined to fight for our cause.”[4]

To quote the bill’s sponsor, “Amelia Boynton Robinson was known as the matriarch of the voting rights movement. Her life and legacy epitomized strength, resilience, perseverance and courage — the same characteristics that embody the City of Selma where she made such a significant impact.  Amelia Boynton Robinson is well-known for braving the front line of the Selma march on the Edmund Pettus Bridge and was brutally attacked on Bloody Sunday. A warrior for what was right and a brave soldier in the fight, Amelia Boynton Robinson was a champion in the movement that lead to the passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965.”[5]

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[1] See “Amelia Boynton Robinson, a Pivotal Figure at the Selma March, Dies at 104.” New York Times. August 26, 2015.
[2] Id.
[3] Id.
[4] Id.
[5] See “Rep. Terri Sewell sponsors Bill to name Selma Post Office after Voting Rights Activist Amelia Boynton Robinson.”

Cost

A Congressional Budget Office (CBO) cost estimate is currently unavailable.

Additional Information

For questions or further information please contact Jake Vreeburg with the House Republican Policy Committee by email or at 5-0190.