H.R. 4618, to designate the Federal building and United States courthouse located at 121 Spring Street SE in Gainesville, Georgia, as the "Sidney Oslin Smith, Jr. Federal Building and United States Courthouse"

H.R. 4618

to designate the Federal building and United States courthouse located at 121 Spring Street SE in Gainesville, Georgia, as the "Sidney Oslin Smith, Jr. Federal Building and United States Courthouse"

Date
April 18, 2016 (114th Congress, 2nd Session)

Staff Contact
John Huston

Floor Situation

On Monday, April 18, 2016, the House will consider H.R. 4618, to designate the Federal building and United States courthouse located at 121 Spring Street SE in Gainesville, Georgia, as the “Sidney Oslin Smith, Jr. Federal Building and United States Courthouse”, under suspension of the rules. H.R. 4618 was introduced on February 25, 2016 by Rep. Doug Collins (R-GA), and was referred to the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure, which ordered the bill reported by voice vote on March 23, 2016.

 

Bill Summary

H.R. 4618 designates the federal building and U.S. courthouse located at 121 Spring Street S.E. in Gainesville, Georgia, as the “Sidney Olsin Smith, Jr. Federal Building and United States Courthouse.”

 

Background

Born in Gainesville, Georgia, Smith served in the U.S. Army during World War II, as a Captain. Smith received an A.B. from Harvard College in 1947 and an LL.B. from the University of Georgia School of Law in 1949. He was in private practice in Gainesville, Georgia from 1949 to 1962 and an Assistant Solicitor General of the Northeastern Judicial Circuit of Alabama from 1951 to 1961.

On August 24, 1965, Smith was nominated by President Lyndon B. Johnson to a seat on the United States District Court for the Northern District of Georgia, vacated by William Boyd Sloan. Smith was confirmed by the United States Senate on September 10, 1965, and received his commission the same day. He served as chief judge from 1968 until his resignation from the bench on June 1, 1974, Smith then returned to private practice in Atlanta, Georgia.

According to the sponsors of the bill, “Judge Smith dedicated his life to serving the public, and his influence is still felt here in Gainesville. The federal courthouse in Gainesville is a symbol of public service and civic duty, and Judge Smith dedicated his life to the high ideals of justice, honor, and family. Naming the courthouse after him will keep his legacy alive for years to come.”[1]

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[1] See Congressman Collins, Senator Isakson, and Senator Perdue Introduce Legislation to Name Gainesville Courthouse After Former U.S. District Judge Sidney Smith

Cost

A CBO cost estimate is not currently available.

 

Additional Information

For questions or further information please contact Robert Goad with the House Republican Policy Committee by email or at 6-1831.