H.R. 4127, Intelligence Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016

H.R. 4127

Intelligence Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016

Date
December 1, 2015 (114th Congress, 1st Session)

Staff Contact
Communications

Floor Situation

On Tuesday, December 1, 2015, the House will consider H.R. 4127, the Intelligence Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016, under suspension of the rules.  H.R. 4127 was introduced on November 30, 2015, by Rep. Devin Nunes (R-CA), Chairman of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence.

Bill Summary

H.R. 4127 authorizes appropriations for intelligence and intelligence-related activities of the U.S. government.  Specifically, the bill authorizes funds for the intelligence and intelligence-related activities of the:  Office of the Director of National Intelligence; Central Intelligence Agency; Department of Defense; Defense Intelligence Agency; National Security Agency; the Departments of the Army, Navy, and Air Force; Coast Guard; Department of State; Department of Treasury; Department of Energy; Department of Justice; Federal Bureau of Investigation; Drug Enforcement Administration; National Reconnaissance Office; National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency; and, the Department of Homeland Security.

The amounts authorized by the bill for these elements for the conduct of intelligence activities are specified in a classified schedule of authorizations.  The office of the Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence will be open during regular business hours for the convenience of any Member who wishes to review the classified schedule of authorizations prior to its consideration by the House. Please contact the Committee main line at (202) 225-4121 or email Damon Nelson (damon.nelson@mail.house.gov) with questions.

H.R. 4127 is largely similar to H.R. 2596, the Intelligence Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016, which the House passed in June.  The bill maintains prohibitions on the transfer or release of individuals detained at Guantanamo Bay to the United States, on the use of funds to construct or modify facilities in the U.S. to house such detainees, and on the use of funds to transfer or release such detainees to certain countries.  These prohibitions complement those enacted in the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016.

H.R. 4127 also includes several additional sections on matters relating to foreign countries that H.R. 2596 did not contain.  Specifically, the bill requires the DNI to: report to Congress if the Russian Federation deploys a container missile system to the Russian military; provide an assessment to Congress on the funding of political parties and nongovernmental organizations in former Soviet states and countries in Europe by the Russian Security Services since January 1, 2006; and, submit an assessment to Congress on the use of political assassinations as a form of statecraft by the Russian Federation since January 1, 2000.

The bill also: requires the DNI to provide Congress with an assessment of resources used for collection efforts and the collection posture of the intelligence community with regard to the South China Sea and East China Sea; requires the Secretary of State to ensure that each key supervisory position at a U.S. diplomatic facility in Cuba is occupied by a citizen of the United States; and, requires the Secretary of State to ensure that each U.S. diplomatic facility in Cuba is constructed or undergoes a construction upgrade that includes a sensitive compartmented information facility.

The bill further requires the DNI to report to Congress on the monetary value of any direct or indirect forms of sanctions relief that Iran has received since the Joint Plan of Action (Iran nuclear deal) first entered into effect, including how Iran has used such funds and the extent to which those funds have enabled Iran to support international terrorism.

For more information, click here for the previous Legislative Digest on H.R. 2596.

Background

The U.S. Intelligence Community (IC) consists of 17 agencies and organizations, including the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI), within the Executive Branch that work both independently and collaboratively to gather and analyze the intelligence necessary to conduct foreign relations and national security activities.[1]  The mission of the ODNI is to lead intelligence integration and forge an Intelligence Community that delivers the most insightful intelligence possible.[2]

The House passed H.R. 2596, the Intelligence Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016, by a vote of 247 to 178 on June 16, 2015.

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[1] http://www.dni.gov/index.php
[2] http://www.dni.gov/index.php/about/mission

Cost

A Congressional Budget Office (CBO) cost estimate is currently unavailable.

Additional Information

For questions or further information please contact Jerry White with the House Republican Policy Committee by email or at 5-0190.