H.R. 3937, To designate the building utilized as a United States courthouse located at 150 Reade Circle in Greenville, North Carolina, as the “Judge Randy D. Doub United States Courthouse.”

H.R. 3937

To designate the building utilized as a United States courthouse located at 150 Reade Circle in Greenville, North Carolina, as the “Judge Randy D. Doub United States Courthouse.”

Sponsor
Rep. G, K. Butterfield

Date
September 20, 2016 (114th Congress, 2nd Session)

Staff Contact
Communications

Floor Situation

On­­­­ Tuesday, September 20, 2016, the House will consider H.R. 3937, to designate the building utilized as a United States courthouse located at 150 Reade Circle in Greenville, North Carolina, as the “Judge Randy D. Doub United States Courthouse”, under suspension of the rules. H.R. 3937 was introduced on November 11, 2015, by Rep. G. K. Butterfield (D-NC) and was referred to the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure, which ordered the bill reported as amended by voice vote on March 2, 2016.

Bill Summary

H.R. 3937, as amended, designates the building utilized as a United States courthouse located at 150 Reade Circle in Greenville, North Carolina, as the “Randy D. Doub United States Courthouse.”

Background

Randy D. Doub attended East Carolina University and graduated Magna Cum Laude in 1977, with a major in Political Science and a minor in Business Administration. He later earned a law degree from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1980.[1]

In totality, Randy D. Doub practiced private law in Greenville, North Carolina for 26 years. He was appointed to the North Carolina Board of Transportation in 1985 and served in this role until 1990. In 2006, the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals appointed Judge Doug as a United States Bankruptcy Judge for the Eastern District of North Carolina. He served as the chief bankruptcy judge between 2007 and 2014.[2]

Last year, at the age of 59, Judge Doub passed away suddenly. “Judge Doub was an outstanding public servant and leader who was always held in the highest regard by all who knew him,” according to the bill’s sponsor. “Naming the United States Courthouse in Greenville in his honor is a fitting way to commemorate a man who gave so much of himself to the Pitt County community he loved.”[3]

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[1] See House Report 114-464, at 2.
[2] Id.
[3] See Rep. Butterfield’s Press Release, November 5, 2016.

Cost

The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) estimates that enacting the bill would have no significant effect on the federal budget and would not affect direct spending or revenues; therefore, pay-as-you-go procedures do not apply.

Additional Information

For questions or further information please contact John Wilson with the House Republican Policy Committee by email or at 6-1811.