H.R. 3912: To designate the facility of the United States Postal Service located at 110 Mastic Road in Mastic Beach, New York, as the "Brigadier General Nathaniel Woodhull Post Office Building"

H.R. 3912

To designate the facility of the United States Postal Service located at 110 Mastic Road in Mastic Beach, New York, as the "Brigadier General Nathaniel Woodhull Post Office Building"

Date
November 28, 2012 (112th Congress, 2nd Session)

Staff Contact
Sarah Makin

Floor Situation

On Wednesday, November 28, 2012, the House is scheduled to consider H.R. 3912, under a suspension of the rules requiring a two-thirds majority vote for passage.  H.R. 3912 was introduced by Rep. Tim Bishop (D-NY) on February 7, 2012, and was referred to the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, which reported the bill by unanimous consent on June 27, 2012. 

 

 

Bill Summary

H.R. 3912 would designate the facility of the United States Postal Service located at 110 Mastic Road in Mastic Beach, New York, as the “Brigadier General Nathaniel Woodhull Post Office Building.”

Background

Woodhull entered the military and in 1758 held the rank of major.  He fought in numerous battles during the French and Indian War. He was at the Battle of Carillon under General Abercromby, and at the Battle of Fort Frontenac under General Bradstreet. In 1760, as colonel of the 3rd Regiment of New York Provincials took part in the invasion of Canada during the under General Amherst. In October 1775, he was made brigadier general of the Suffolk and Queen's County militia. In 1776, he took part in the Battle of Long Island. Leading up to the battle, his militia began removing livestock and material to prevent its use by the British. The Battle of Long Island resulted in his hand being cut off and he retired to Jamaica. Relief was not forthcoming, and his situation deteriorated. Woodhull was captured near Jamaica by a detachment of Fraser's Highlanders led by captain Sir James Baird. He was struck with a sword multiple times, injuring his arm and head by a British officer purportedly for not saying, "God save the King," as ordered, saying instead "God save us all." He was taken to a cattle transport, serving as a prison ship in Gravesend Bay. His arm was amputated in an effort to save his life, he managed to call for his wife who was at his side when he died on September 20, 1776. He was buried at his family home.

Cost

A CBO cost estimate for H.R. 3912 was not available as of press time.