H.R. 347X: Senate Amendment to H.R. 347, the Federal Restricted Buildings and Grounds Improvement Act of 2011

H.R. 347X

Senate Amendment to H.R. 347, the Federal Restricted Buildings and Grounds Improvement Act of 2011

Sponsor
Rep. Tom Rooney

Date
February 28, 2012 (112th Congress, 2nd Session)

Staff Contact
Sarah Makin

Floor Situation

On Monday, February 27, 2012, the House is scheduled to consider a motion to concur in the Senate Amendment to H.R. 347, the Federal Restricted Buildings and Grounds Improvement Act of 2011, under a suspension of the rules requiring a two-thirds majority vote for approval. 

H.R. 347, sponsored by Rep. Tom Rooney (R-FL), was approved by the House on March 1, 2011 by a vote of 399-3

Bill Summary

The Senate made two minor changes to H.R. 347 and sent it back to the House for consideration.  One change made by the Senate was a technical change, and the second change would add individuals who are under Secret Service protection pursuant to a presidential memorandum and not just statute.  The House Committee on the Judiciary supports these changes. 

Cost

According to CBO, H.R. 368 would have no significant cost to the federal government.  The legislation could affect direct spending and revenues, so pay-as-you-go procedures apply, but CBO estimates that any such effects would not be significant.

H.R. 347 would modify and expand the current laws that prohibit access to certain federal property.  Thus, the government might be able to pursue cases against violators that it otherwise would not be able to prosecute.  However, CBO expects that H.R. 347 would apply to a relatively small number of offenders, so any increase in costs for law enforcement, court proceedings, or prison operations would not be significant.  Any such costs would be subject to the availability of appropriated funds.

Because those prosecuted and convicted under H.R. 347 could be subject to criminal fines, the federal government might collect additional amounts if the legislation is enacted.  Criminal fines are recorded as revenues, deposited in the Crime Victims Fund, and later spent.  CBO estimates that any additional revenues and direct spending would not be  significant because of the small number of cases likely to be affected.