H.R. 3461, to approve the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, signed at Vienna on July 14, 2015, relating to the nuclear program of Iran.

H.R. 3461

To approve the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, signed at Vienna on July 14, 2015, relating to the nuclear program of Iran.

Date
September 10, 2015 (114th Congress, 1st Session)

Staff Contact
Communications

Floor Situation

On Thursday, September 10, 2015, the House will consider H.R. 3461, a bill to approve the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, signed at Vienna on July 14, 2015, relating to the nuclear program of Iran, under a closed rule.  H.R. 3461 was introduced on September 9, 2015 by House Speaker John Boehner (R-OH) and was referred to the Committee on Foreign Affairs, and in addition, to the Committees on Financial Services, the Judiciary, Oversight and Government Reform, and Ways and Means.

Bill Summary

H.R. 3461 approves the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, signed at Vienna on July 14, 2015, relating to the nuclear program of Iran.

Background

On April 2, 2015, Secretary of State John Kerry announced the outline of the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) regarding the Islamic Republic of Iran’s nuclear program that was negotiated in Lausanne, Switzerland.  On July 14, 2015, Iran and the six nations that have negotiated with Iran over its nuclear program (the United States, United Kingdom, France, Russia, China, and Germany—collectively known as the P5+1) finalized the JCPOA. The U.N. Security Council adopted Resolution 2231 on July 20, 2015, which “endorsed the JCPOA and called on U.N. member states to assist in its implementation.”[1]

The agreement, ostensibly designed to limit Iran’s nuclear program to peaceful purposes, would provide broad relief from U.S., European Union (EU), and United Nations (UN) sanctions.  Click here for a detailed summary and analysis of the agreement provided by the Committee on Foreign Affairs and here for a Congressional Research Service report on selected issues surrounding the agreement.

Many military and foreign policy experts have raised concerns, however, that the agreement includes key shortcomings that will fail to ensure the dismantling of Iran’s nuclear infrastructure while jeopardizing the security of America and its allies.  On August 26, 2015, a group of nearly 200 retired generals and admirals wrote House and Senate leaders urging Congress to reject the agreement, stating that “the agreement will enable Iran to become far more dangerous, render the Mideast still more unstable and introduce new threats to American interests as well as our allies.”

According to Chairman Royce, the agreement will have the effect of “reversing decades of bipartisan U.S. policy, removing Security Council resolutions against Iran’s illicit nuclear program, and endorsing Iran as a nuclear threshold state—able to quickly produce nuclear weapons on an industrial scale in the near future.”[2]

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[1] See CRS Report—“Iran Nuclear Agreement:  Selected Issues for Congress,” August 6, 2015, at Summary.
[2] See Committee on Foreign Affairs—“Iran Nuclear Agreement—Summary and Analysis,” at 1.

Cost

A Congressional Budget Office (CBO) cost estimate is currently unavailable.

Additional Information

For questions or further information please contact Jerry White with the House Republican Policy Committee by email or at 5-0190.