H.R. 3144, Partners for Aviation Security Act, as amended

H.R. 3144

Partners for Aviation Security Act, as amended

Sponsor
Rep. Donald M. Payne

Date
November 17, 2015 (114th Congress, 1st Session)

Staff Contact
Communications

Floor Situation

On Tuesday, November 17, 2015, the House will consider H.R. 3144, the Partners for Aviation Security Act, as amended, under suspension of the rules.  H.R. 3144 was introduced on July 21, 2015 by Rep. Donald M. Payne (D-NJ) and was referred to the Committee on Homeland Security, which ordered the bill reported, as amended, by voice vote on September 30, 2015.

Bill Summary

H.R. 3144 requires the Administrator of the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) to consult with the Aviation Security Advisory Committee (ASAC) regarding any modification to the prohibited item list before making a final determination about making such change.  The bill also authorizes Committee members to remain in their positions after their term has expired, until either a successor begins serving or they are reappointed.

The bill further requires the Secretary of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to submit a report to Congress and the Transportation Security Oversight Board (TSOB) that includes general information on how often the Board has met, the current composition of the Board, and what activities the Board has undertaken pursuant to its statutory duties.

Background

The ASAC “provides advice to the TSA administrator on aviation security matters, including the development, refinement, and implementation of policies, programs, rulemaking, and security directives pertaining to aviation security.”[1]  The committee is composed of individual members representing private sector organizations affected by aviation security requirements. The committee typically meets four times a year and holds a meeting open to the public once a year.[2]  The TSOB is a seven-member board that is chaired by the DHS Secretary and consists of the heads, or their designees, of several federal transportation, law enforcement, intelligence, and security agencies.

According to the bill sponsor, “My district is home to Newark Liberty International Airport, one of the busiest airports in the nation, so I know how important it is to have robust collaboration between the TSA and key aviation stakeholders.  These partnerships enhance our understanding of security concerns and vulnerabilities and guide smart aviation policy decisions.”[3]

__________________
[1] http://www.tsa.gov/for-industry/aviation-security
[2] Id.
[3] See Press Release—“Homeland Security Committee Passes Payne Aviation Security Bill with Bipartisan Support,” September 30, 2015.

Cost

The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) estimates that enacting H.R. 3144 would cost less than $500,000, subject to the availability of appropriated funds. Enacting H.R. 3144 would not affect direct spending or revenues; therefore, pay-as-you-go procedures do not apply.

Additional Information

For questions or further information please contact Jerry White with the House Republican Policy Committee by email or at 5-0190.