H.R. 2892: Department of Homeland Security Appropriations Bill, 2010

H.R. 2892

Department of Homeland Security Appropriations Bill, 2010

Sponsor
Rep. David E. Price

Date
June 24, 2009 (111th Congress, 1st Session)

Staff Contact
Communications

Floor Situation

The House is scheduled to begin consideration of H.R. 2892, the Department of Homeland Security Appropriations Act for Fiscal Year 2010, on Wednesday, June 23, 2009, under a structured rule making a number of amendments in order.  A summary of the amendments made in order under the rule will be distributed when it becomes available.  The rule will likely provide for one motion to recommit, with or without instructions.

Bill Summary

 

Department of Homeland Security Funding in Millions

FY 2009

President's Request

H.R. 2892

FY 2009 vs. H.R. 2892

H.R. 2892 vs. Request

42,050

42,829

42,625

595

-204*

 

H.R. 2892 contains a total of $42.6 billion, which is $595 million, or 1.4 percent, above FY 2009. Agencies funded through the bill received approximately $3 billion in supplemental appropriations outside the normal FY 2009 appropriations process, the vast majority of which came from the "stimulus" bill.

H.R. 2892 would contribute to an overall total discretionary spending level of with a total spending level of $1,089.6 trillion, or 7.6 percent over FY 2009. From FY 2007 to FY 2009, overall total appropriations spending has increased 41 percent in just two years, and non-defense spending has increased 85 percent. The Committee report accompanying H.R. 2892 also includes 160 earmarks totaling more than $265 million.

H.R. 2892 would provide funding for a number of agencies, including the Secret Service, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), the Transportation Security Administration (TSA), Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), the Coast Guard, and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). The following is a summary of the spending highlights and other provisions in the bill.

*H.R. 2892 includes $241 million in overseas contingency operations funding which was not requested. The Majority includes the additional funding level in their comparisons to the President's request, allowing the Majority to present a smaller reduction from the request.

TITLE I—DEPARTMENTAL MANAGEMENT AND OPERATIONS

Office of the Secretary:  Provides $147 million for the Office of the Secretary of Homeland Security, which is $24 million above FY 2009.                                                        
 
Undersecretary for Management:  Provides $268 million for the Undersecretary for Management of the DHS, which is $76.8 million above FY 2009.  The undersecretary provides administrative support and human resources services for the DHS.

Chief Financial Officer:  Provides $63 million for the Chief Financial Officer of the DHS, which is $8.2 million above FY 2009.
                                                                                        
Chief Information Officer:  Provides $299 million for the Chief Information Officer of the DHS, which is $76.8 million above FY 2009, to oversee all DHS information technology.

Analysis and Operations:  Provides $345 million for DHS Analysis and Operations, which is $18 million above FY 2009.  This provides funding for the Office of Intelligence and Analysis and the Directorate of Operations Coordination, which collect and evaluate intelligence information.

TITLE II—SECURITY, ENFORCEMENT, AND INVESTIGATIONS

U.S. Customs and Border Protection Expenses:  Provides a total of $9.9 billion for U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) salaries and expenses, which is $146 million above FY 2009. CBP is responsible for preventing and deterring threats along U.S. borders or at ports.  The CBP’s main focus is stopping terrorists, weapons, drugs, or other contraband from entering the U.S.  Funding for salaries and expenses supports border security administration, inspections, cargo screening, detection technology, border security staff, and training.  CBP received $980 million in supplemental appropriations from the “stimulus” bill.

In addition to $7.6 billion for salaries and expense, the bill provides funding for other CBP programs as follows:

➢    $462 million for Automation Modernization to update information technologies,  $48 million below FY 2009.
➢    $732 million for Border Fencing, Infrastructure, and Technology,  $43 million below FY 2009.
➢    $513 million for Air and Marine Border Protection, $14 million below FY 2009.
➢    $682 million for CBP facilities management,  $279 million above FY 2009.

Immigration and Customs Enforcement:  Provides a total of $5.4 billion for Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), which is $439 million above FY 2009, but $29.7 million below the President’s request.  ICE is the lead federal agency responsible for immigration and customs law and enforcement.  The bill provides $105 million for ICE information technology modernization and $11.8 million for construction.  The bill would allocate $1.5 billion for efforts to identify undocumented individuals with criminal records and deportation.  Funding in the bill also provides for investigations, legal proceedings, intelligence, visa security programs, and detention, custody and removal operations.  ICE received $20 million in supplemental appropriations from the “stimulus” bill.

Federal Protective Service:   Provides $1.1 billion for Federal Protective Services (FPS), which is an increase of $475 million over FY 2009.  FPS provides protection at federally owned or operated buildings and facilities.

Transportation Security Administration:  Provides $5.26 billion for Transportation Security Administration (TSA) Aviation Security, which is an increase of $511 million over FY 2009.  The funding provides for screening personnel, training and equipment.  TSA received $1 billion in supplemental appropriations for explosives detection systems and checkpoint screening equipment from the “stimulus” bill.

In addition to aviation security, the bill provides funding for other transportation security programs as follows:
➢    $103 million for Surface Transportation Security, $53.8 million above FY 2009.
➢    $171 million for Transportation Threat Assessment, $55 million above FY 2009.
➢    $992 million for Transportation Security Support, $45 million above FY 2009.
➢    $860 million for Federal Air Marshals, $40 million above FY 2009.

Coast Guard Expenses:  Provides $6.8 billion for the U.S. Coast Guard's salaries and expenses, which is $627 million above FY 2009.  Funding for salaries and expenses provides for Coast Guard administration, pay and allowance, health care, recruitment, maintenance, training, and ongoing operations.  The Coast Guard received $140 million in supplemental appropriations from the “stimulus” bill.

In addition to salaries and expenses, the bill provides funding for other Coast Guard programs as follows:

➢    $13 million for Coast Guard Environmental Compliance and Restoration, $198,000 above FY 2009.
➢    $133 million for Coast Guard Reserve Training, $3 million above FY 2009.
➢    $1.347 billion for Coast Guard Acquisition, Construction, and Improvements, $147 million less than FY 2009.
➢    $10 million for the alteration of bridges, $6 million less than FY 2009.  However, the Coast Guard received $142 million, or 1,420 percent, more than FY 2010, for bridge alterations in the “stimulus” bill.
➢    $19.7 million for Coast Guard research, development, tests, and evaluations, $1.7 million above FY 2009.
➢    $261 million for the Coast Guard Retiree Health Care Fund, $3.6 million above FY 2009.
➢    $1.36 billion for the Coast Guard Retired Pay, $48 million above FY 2009.

Secret Service:  Provides $1.4 billion for salaries and expenses, which is $48 million above FY 2009.  In addition, the bill provides $3.97 million for acquisition and construction, which is $250,000 less than FY 2009.

TITLE III—PROTECTION, PREPAREDNESS, RESPONSE, AND RECOVERY

Infrastructure Protection and Information Security:  Provides $883 million for Infrastructure Protection and Information Security (IPIS), which is an increase of $76 million increase over FY 2009.  The IPIS works within the DHS to reduce infrastructure vulnerability and oversees the National Cyber Security Division.

US Visitor and Immigrant Status Indicator Technology:   Provides $351 million for the U.S. Visitor and Immigrant Status Indicator Technology program, U.S.-VISIT, which is an increase of $51 million over FY 2009.  The program attempts to encourage and facilitate travel and trade.

Federal Emergency Management Agency Administration:  Provides $844 million for the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) management and administration, which is $7 million above FY 2009.  $35 million would be obligated to resolve employee pay shortfalls, which have occurred as a result of “lax hiring and budgeting guidelines at FEMA,” according to the Committee on Appropriations.  FEMA received $615 million in supplemental appropriations from the “stimulus” bill.

State and Local Programs:  Provides $2.89 billion for State and Local Assistance and Grant Programs, which his $276 million below FY 2009.  Local grants and aid made available with this funding includes the State Homeland Security Grant Program, the Citizen Corps program, Real ID grants, Port Security Grants, Bus Security Assistance, and the natural disaster exercise program.  These programs received $300 million in supplemental appropriations from the “stimulus” bill.

Firefighter Assistance Grants:  Provides $800 million for Firefighter Assistance Grants that are provided to local fire departments, which is $25 million over FY 2009.  The program received $210 million in supplemental appropriations from the “stimulus” bill.

Emergency Management Performance Grants:  Provides $330 million for the Emergency Management Performance Grant (EMPG) program, which is $15 million above FY 2009.  The program provides State and local grants for disaster mitigation and preparedness programs.  The program is the only FEMA grant program that requires matching funds from State and local governments.

Disaster Relief fund:  Provides $2 billion for FEMA disaster relief funding, which is an increase of $600 million over FY 2009.   The fund received $13.1 billion in FY 2008, and received $1.4 billion thus far in FY 2009, mostly through emergency appropriations to respond to natural disasters.

Flood Maps and Fund:  Provides $220 million, the same amount as FY 2009, to modernize and digitize over 100,000 of the nation's flood maps, which are used to calculate risk-based premiums for the National Flood Insurance Program.  The bill also appropriates $159 million for the National Flood Insurance Fund, which is $2.8 million over FY 2009.

Emergency Food and Shelter:  Provides $200 million, the same amount as FY 2009, for FEMA’s Emergency Food and Shelter National Board Program, which received $100 million in supplemental appropriations from the “stimulus” bill.

TITLE IV—RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT, TRAINING, AND SERVICES

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services:  Provides $248 million for U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, which is $146 million above FY 2009. 

Federal Law Enforcement Training Center:  Provides $239 million for the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center, which is $7 million less than FY 2009.  The bill also provides an additional $43 million for Federal Law Enforcement Training Center construction, which is $43 million less than FY 2009.

DHS Science and Development:  Provides $825 million for DHS research, development, and acquisitions, which is $25 million above FY 2009.  In addition, the bill appropriates $142 million for DHS science and technology spending, which is $10 million above FY 2009.

Nuclear Detection:  Provides $39 million for the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office, which is $2 million above FY 2009, and $326 million for Nuclear Detection research and development, which is $3 million above FY 2009.

TOTAL FUNDING LEVELS IN THOUSANDS

Cost

According to the CBO, H.R. 2892 would appropriate $42.65 billion in funds for FY 2010.