H.R. 2800: To amend the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994 to reauthorize the Missing Alzheimer''s Disease Patient Alert Program

H.R. 2800

To amend the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994 to reauthorize the Missing Alzheimer''s Disease Patient Alert Program

Date
September 11, 2012 (112th Congress, 2nd Session)

Staff Contact
Sarah Makin

Floor Situation

On Tuesday, September 11, 2012, the House is scheduled to consider H.R. 2800, a bill to amend the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994 to reauthorize the Missing Alzheimer's Disease Patient Alert Program, under a suspension of the rules requiring a two-thirds majority vote for approval.  The bill was introduced on August 5, 2011, by Rep. Maxine Waters (D-CA) and referred to the Committee on the Judiciary, which held a markup and reported the bill by voice vote.

Bill Summary

H.R. 2800 would reauthorize the Department of Justice’s Missing Alzheimer's Disease Patient Alert program at $1 million a year for fiscal years 2013-2017.

Background

According to CRS, the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994 (P.L. 103-322) authorized the Missing Alzheimer's Disease Patient Alert program to provide grants to locally based organizations to protect and locate missing patients with Alzheimer's disease and related dementia. Funding was authorized at $900,000 for each of FY1996, FY1997, and FY1998. Congress has appropriated funding for the program from FY1996 through FY2011. Funding more than doubled from FY2008 to FY2009. These funds, administered by DOJ's Office of Justice Programs, have been awarded to the Alzheimer's Association, an organization that provides research on Alzheimer's disease.  In FY 2012, the program received $1 million in funding. The Obama Administration has proposed no funding for the program, and no further information about this proposal is provided in the congressional budget justifications.

Cost

The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) estimates that H.R. 2800 will cost approximately $4 million over five years.  The current authorization for the program has yielded an appropriation of $1 million per year.