H.R. 2733, Nevada Native Nations Land Act, as amended

H.R. 2733

Nevada Native Nations Land Act, as amended

Date
June 7, 2016 (114th Congress, 2nd Session)

Staff Contact
Molly Newell

Floor Situation

On Tuesday, June 7, 2016, the House will consider H.R. 2733, Nevada Native Nations Land Act, under suspension of the rules. The bill was introduced on June 11, 2015, by Rep. Mark Amodei (R-NV) and was referred to the Committee on Natural Resources which ordered the bill reported, in the Nature of a Substitute, by Unanimous Consent on April 12, 2016.

Bill Summary

H.R. 2733 would authorize the following land conveyances between the federal government and various tribes in Nevada:

  • 19,094 acres of land managed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to be held in trust for the benefit of the Fort McDermitt Paiute and Shoshone Tribe;
  • 82 acres of land managed by the United States Forest Service to be held in trust for the benefit of the Shoshone Paiute Tribes of the Duck Valley Indian Reservation;
  • 941 acres of land managed by BLM to be held in trust for the benefit of the Summit Lake Paiute Tribe;
  • 13,434 acres of land managed by BLM to be held in trust for the benefit of the Reno-Sparks Indian Colony;
  • 6,357 acres of land managed by BLM to be held in trust for the benefit of the Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe; and
  • 31,229 acres of land managed by BLM to be held in trust for the benefit of the Duckwater Shoshone Tribe.

Background

The Fort McDermitt Paiute Tribe and Shoshone Tribe both share the Fort McDermitt Reservation, located in Humboldt County, Nevada and Malheur County, Oregon. According to the Nevada Indian Commission, the tribes currently have approximately 16,000 acres of trust land in Nevada and approximately 18,000 acres in Oregon. The tribes plan to use the land transferred under the bill for the development of natural resources.

The Duck Valley Reservation, on the Nevada-Idaho border, encompasses close to 290,000 acres. The Shoshone and Paiute Tribes of the Duck Valley Reservation plan to use the lands transferred under Section 3(b) of the bill to address a tribal housing shortage.

The Summit Lake Paiute Reservation is located in northwestern Nevada. Today, the reservation is approximately 12,500 acres. The Tribe plans to use the lands transferred under the bill for protection and management of Summit Lake, including natural resources and a once abundant Lahontan cutthroat trout population.

The Reno-Sparks Indian Colony, in western Nevada near the California border, comprises approximately 70 acres in Reno, Nevada, 40 acres south of Reno, and nearly 2,000 acres in Hungry Valley. The Reno-Sparks Indian Colony tribe plans to use the lands transferred under the bill to alleviate a housing strain, and for cultural preservation and development.

The Pyramid Lake Reservation is approximately a half-million acres in a remote part of western Nevada, in Washoe, Lyon, and Stoney Counties, 40 miles away from Reno. Several Indian communities are within the reservation, including Nixon, Sutcliffe, and Wadsworth. The Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe plans to incorporate the watershed of Pyramid Lake. Other uses include potential economic development and management efficiency.

The Duckwater Indian Reservation is composed of approximately 3,800 acres located in east-central Nevada, approximately 200 miles northwest of Las Vegas. The Duckwater Shoshone Tribe would use additional land to support additional grazing and agricultural activities, promote renewable energy, economic development, and housing.[1]

The Senate passed their version of the bill (S.1436) out of the Indian Affairs Committee on February 29, 2016. It was agreed to in the Senate under unanimous consent and passed on April 14, 2016. Substantively similar legislation, H.R. 2455, the Nevada Native Nations Land Act, was introduced in the 113th Congress and passed the House on December 1, 2014 by voice vote.

According to the sponsor, “This legislation balances the unique needs of our Nevada tribal nations with those of other local ranchers, land owners, and businesses. These lands will enable the tribes to chart brighter futures for their community and preserve their cultural heritage and traditions.”[2]

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[1] See H. Rept. 114-479
[2] See Press Release, “Nevada Native Lands Act.”

Cost

The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) estimates that implementing the legislation would not have a significant effect on the federal budget. CBO estimates that conveying these lands would reduce offsetting receipts (which are treated as increases in direct spending); however, they estimate that such losses would be insignificant. Because enacting H.R. 2733 would increase direct spending, pay-as-you-go procedures apply. Enacting H.R. 2733 would not affect revenues. CBO estimates that enacting H.R. 2733 would not increase net direct spending or on-budget deficits by more than $5 billion in any of the next four consecutive 10-year periods beginning in 2027.

Additional Information

For questions about amendments or further information on the bill, contact Molly Newell with the House Republican Policy Committee by email or at 2-1374.