H.R. 2458, To designate the facility of the United States Postal Service located at 5351 Lapalco Boulevard in Marrero, Louisiana, as the "Lionel R. Collins, Sr. Post Office Building"

H.R. 2458

To designate the facility of the United States Postal Service located at 5351 Lapalco Boulevard in Marrero, Louisiana, as the "Lionel R. Collins, Sr. Post Office Building"

Sponsor
Rep. Cedric Richmond

Date
March 1, 2016 (114th Congress, 2nd Session)

Staff Contact
John Huston

Floor Situation

On Tuesday, March 1, 2016, the House will consider H.R. 2458, to designate the facility of the United States Postal Service located at 5351 Lapalco Boulevard in Marrero, Louisiana, as the “Lionel R. Collins, Sr. Post Office Building,” under suspension of the rules. H.R. 2458 was introduced on May 19, 2015, by Rep. Cedric Richmond (D-LA) and was referred to the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, which ordered the bill reported by unanimous consent on December 9, 2015.

Bill Summary

H.R. 2458 designates the United States Postal Service facility located at 5351 Lapalco Boulevard in Marrero, Louisiana, as the “Lionel R. Collins, Sr. Post Office Building”.

Background

Lionel Collins was a pioneering civil rights lawyer who dedicated his life to making New Orleans a more just and equal community.  He was the first African-American to win elected office in Jefferson Parish, where he served as a judge in 24th Judicial District Court in Gretna.  He passed away in 1988 at age 60.

Collins graduated from Xavier University in 1951 and received his Juris Doctorate from Howard University in 1954. Throughout his career as a lawyer, Collins played a major role in the civil rights struggle in the South.  Beginning in 1957, Collins led groundbreaking cases that helped to overturn practices of “white only” jobs and higher pay for white employees at the Celotex Corporation.

Collins continued to successfully steer desegregation cases with the NAACP across Louisiana.  His work integrated West Jefferson Hospital and Jefferson Parish Public Schools.  His courtroom successes and courage in civil rights initiatives earned him the role of Jefferson Parish’s first African-American Assistant Parish Attorney in 1968.  In 1977, Judge Collins made history by receiving an interim appointment from the Louisiana Supreme Court to serve as Judge to the newly created Division L of the 24th Judicial District.  He was re-elected to serve a second six-year term in 1984, and named Chief Judge by his fellow judges for the 1985-87 term.  All of these accomplishments were firsts for an African American.

In addition his civil rights work, Collins served the New Orleans community through his career.  He served as a board member for the Urban League and Selective Service.  As a testament to his life and legacy, the Jefferson Parish School Board voted to rename Ames Montessori School in Marrero as Judge Lionel R. Collins Elementary in 2011.

Cost

A Congressional Budget Office (CBO) cost estimate is currently not available.

Additional Information

For questions or further information please contact John Huston with the House Republican Policy Committee by email or at 6-5539.