H.R. 2366, World War I American Veterans Centennial Commemorative Coin Act, as amended

H.R. 2366

World War I American Veterans Centennial Commemorative Coin Act, as amended

Date
December 2, 2014 (113th Congress, 2nd Session)

Staff Contact
Communications

Floor Situation

On Tuesday, December 2, 2014, the House will consider H.R. 2366, the World War I American Veterans Centennial Commemorative Coin Act, under a suspension of the rules.  H.R. 2366 was introduced on June 13, 2013 by Rep. Doug Lamborn (R-CO) and referred to the Committee on Financial Services.

Bill Summary

H.R. 2366 directs the Secretary of the Treasury to mint and issue $1 silver coins to commemorate the centennial of America’s involvement in World War I.  The design of the coins will be determined through a juried and compensated designed competition.  The coins would be issued solely during calendar year 2018.  H.R. 2366 also subjects the coin sales to a $10 surcharge per coin; after privately sourced matching funds are raised in compliance with Title 31, Sec. 5134(F), USC, the surcharge revenue would be paid to the United States Foundation for the Commemoration of the World Wars, to enable the work of the World War I Centennial Commission.

Background

2018 marks the 100th anniversary of the signing of the armistice with Germany, which ended World War I hostilities.[1]  The United States entered World War I on April 6, 1917 by declaring war on Germany.[2]  More than 4 million Americans served in uniform during World War I, including 2 million overseas.[3]  Frank Buckles, the last American veterans from World War I, died on February 27, 2011.[4]  The 112th Congress established the World War I Centennial Commission “to plan, develop, and execute programs, projects, and activities to commemorate the centennial of World War I.[5]  H.R. 2366 would honor the 4 million that served during World War I, and commemorate the centennial of America’s involvement through the minting of a commemorative coin.

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[1] See H.R. 2366, Sec. 2.
[2] See Id.
[3] See Id.
[4] See Id.
[5] See Id.

Cost

An informal CBO cost indicates enactment would have “no significant net impact on direct spending.”

Additional Information

For questions or further information contact the GOP Conference at 5-5107.