H.R. 2142a: Government Efficiency, Effectiveness, and Performance Improvement Act

H.R. 2142a

Government Efficiency, Effectiveness, and Performance Improvement Act

Sponsor
Rep. Henry Cuellar

Date
December 21, 2010 (111th Congress, 2nd Session)

Staff Contact
Communications

Floor Situation

H.R. 2142 is expected to be considered on the House floor on Tuesday, December 21, 2010, under a closed rule.  This legislation was introduced by Rep. Henry Cuellar (D-TX) on April 28, 2010. 

Bill Summary

H.R. 2142 would require federal agencies to establish performance plans to used for assessing agency performance and improving efficiency.  The bill would establish the Performance Improvement Council to assist in the development of performance standards, facilitate the exchange of information among agencies, and coordinate and monitor performance assessment efforts.

Additionally, the bill would require training for employees who analyze and evaluate government programs, a performance oversight report by the Government Accountability Office, and a study by the Office of Personnel Management regarding the evaluation of government programs.

Finally, the bill would update reporting requirements which are already established in law, including requiring each agency head to submit a strategic plan for program activities to the Office of Management and Budget and Congress.

Member Concerns:  Currently, the federal government spends up to $100 million annually in compliance costs related to the preparation of performance and strategy plans.  Some members may be concerned that this bill would increase the burden of complying with additional performance reporting requirements which, according to the Congressional Budget Office, could increase government spending by $75 million over the 2011-2015 periods.

In addition, some members may be concerned that this bill would increase government bureaucracy with the creation of the Performance Improvement Council.

Background

H.R. 2142 was originally approved by the House, under suspension of the rules, on June 16, 2010

Cost

According to the Congressional Budget Office, H.R. 2142 would increase an agency’s administrative workload in order to carry out some of the requirements included in this bill.  CBO estimate that additional spending among the 23 major federal agencies would vary, but on average would cost $1 million a year for each agency to implement the new requirements. 

In total, CBO estimates implementing the bill would increase spending by $75 million over the 2011-2015 periods.