H.R. 2055 Conference Report: Military Construction, Veterans Affairs, and Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2012 and Accompanying Legislation

H.R. 2055

Military Construction, Veterans Affairs, and Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2012 and Accompanying Legislation

Sponsor
Sen. Bernard Sanders

Date
December 16, 2011 (112th Congress, 1st Session)

Staff Contact
Communications

Floor Situation

On Friday, December 16, 2011, the House is scheduled to consider H.R. 2055, the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2012, under a rule.  The bill was originally introduced on May 31, 2011, as the Military Construction and Veterans Affairs, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act of 2012, by Rep. John Culberson (R-TX). The bill was approved in the House on June 14, 2011, by a vote of 411-5.  An amended version of the legislation was approved in the Senate by a vote of 91-2 on July 20, 2011.  On December 7, 2011, conferees were appointed and on December 15, 2011, the Conference Report was filed to provide funding for a total of nine appropriations bills included in the underlying legislation.

Bill Summary

The Conference Report on H.R. 2055 would provide FY 2012 discretionary funding for nine appropriations bills: Defense, Energy & Water, Financial Services, Homeland Security, Interior & Environment, Labor/HHS/Education, Legislative Branch, Military/Veterans, and State/Foreign Operations.

 

H.R. 3671 and Accompanying Legislation Spending by Division
(According to CBO, All Spending in Millions) 

Appropriations Bill

Non-Emergency Discretionary Appropriations

Overseas Contingency Spending

Emergency Disaster Spending

Emergency Disaster Offsets

Defense

518,146

115,083

0

0

Energy and Water

32,010

0

1,724

‐603

Financial Services

21,526

0

0

‐433

Homeland Security

39,600

258

6,400

‐724

Interior

29,175

0

0

‐538

Labor, HHS, Education

156,284

0

483

‐2,589

Legislative Branch

4,307

0

0

‐79

Military Construction, VA

71,747

0

0

0

State, Foreign Operations

42,140

11,203

0

‐1,000

Total

914,935

126,544

8,607*

-5,966*

 Offsets total*$8.607 billion including savings from the three previously enacted FY 2012 appropriations

 

The bill would provide a total of $914.9 billion in non-emergency discretionary budget authority for the nine appropriations bills, including $518.1 billion for Defense, $32 billion for Energy & Water, $21.5 billion for Financial Services, $39.6 billion for Homeland Security, $29.2 billion for Interior & Environment, $156.3 billion for Labor/HHS/Education, $4.3 billion for Legislative Branch, $71.7 billion for Military/Veterans, and $42.1 for State/Foreign Operations. The bill, when combined with the three appropriations bills already enacted (H.R. 2112), would provide a total of $1.043 trillion in non-emergency, discretionary appropriations. Total non-emergency funding for FY 2012 is within the discretionary spending caps established in the Budget Control Act (S. 365). Total FY 2012 funding represents a $6 billion decrease from FY 2011 funding for these agencies.  In addition to regular appropriations for the Department of Defense, the Conference Report would provide $115.1 billion in funds for overseas contingency operations (OCO) and other ongoing operations related to the global war on terrorism.

 

The bill would also maintain a number of pro-life provisions such as the Hyde amendment, conscience protections, a reduction of $2 million to Title X, and would cut UNFPA funding by $5 million. The final Conference Report is the same as the consolidated funding bill filed earlier this week (H.R. 3671) with two exceptions: 1) The Conference Report removes language that would have changed travel and remittances restrictions related to Cuba (section 634) and language clarifying the Department of Treasury’s “cash in advance” rule regarding certain U.S. exports to Cuba (section 632); and 2) The Conference Report would allow the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) to transfer $10 million in funding between the agency’s Information Technology account and its Salaries and Expenses account.

 

In addition to the underlying bill, the House will consider legislation to provide $8.6 billion in emergency disaster funding for FEMA and the Army Corps of Engineers (H.R. 3672) as well as legislation to offset the disaster funding with a 1.83 percent across-the-board cut to all FY 2012 base discretionary spending, excluding Department of Defense, Military Construction, and Veterans Affairs (H.Con.Res. 94). Summaries of these bills are included in this Legislative Digest. 

 

Total FY 2012 Non-Emergency Appropriations 
(According to CBO, All Spending in Millions)

Appropriations Bill

FY 2011

FY 2012

Change

Percentage Change

Agriculture

19,922

19,770

-152

-0.8%

Commerce/Justice/Science

53,327

52,744

-583

-1.1%

Defense

513,025

518,146

5,121

1.0%

Energy and Water

31,682

32,010

328

1.0%

Financial Services

21,950

21,526

-424

-1.9%

Homeland Security

41,661

39,600

-2,061

-4.9%

Interior

29,559

29,175

-384

-1.3%

Labor, HHS, Education

157,436

156,284

-1,152

-0.7%

Legislative Branch

4,541

4,307

-234

-5.2%

Military Construction, VA

73,150

71,747

-1,403

-1.9%

State, Foreign Operations

48,162

42,140

-6,022

-12.5%

Transportation, HUD

55,367

55,550

183

0.3%

Total

1,049,782

1,042,999

-6,783

-0.6%

 

The following summaries contain spending and policy highlights of each division within the legislation.

 

DIVISION A—DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE

The bill would provide $518.1 billion in non-emergency discretionary spending for the Department of Defense (DoD). Non-emergency discretionary funding for the DoD would be an increase of $5.1 billion above last year’s level and a reduction of $20.8 billion below the President’s request. In addition, the bill would include $115.1 billion for Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO).

Military Personnel:  The bill would provide $131.1 billion for military personnel, which is an increase of $4.4 billion above FY 2011.  The spending provides funds for pay, allowances, clothing, subsistence, gratuities, travel, and related expenses for active duty personnel and the reserve corps.

Personnel Levels:  H.R. 3671 would provide for personnel levels equal to the president's budget request. The bill provides for personnel levels which would result in an increase in total end strength for the active forces, from 1,410,400 active duty personnel to 1,422,600.  The bill would also increase the end strength for the guard and reserve forces by 900 above last year, from 846,200 to 847,100.

Military Pay Raise:  H.R. 3671 would provide a 1.6 percent base pay raise for military personnel, which is in line with the president’s request and the Defense Authorization legislation.

Operations and Maintenance:  H.R. 3671 would provide $104.6 billion in discretionary spending for DoD operations and maintenance, an increase of $2.5 billion from FY 2011 levels and a reduction of $7.7 billion below the president’s request.  The funds provide for the costs of operating and maintaining the military, including the reserves and related support activities of the DoD such as flight time and battle training, equipment and facility maintenance, and base operations.  The operations and maintenance account also provides funding for civilian pay, services for maintenance, and spare parts for weapons and equipment.

Procurement: H.R. 3671 would provide $104.6 billion for military equipment procurement, an increase of $2.5 billion or 5.3 percent above FY 2011 levels. Procurement funding pays for new equipment and upgrades to ensure that our military forces have the platforms, weapons, and other equipment they need to train, maintain military infrastructure, and conduct successful operations.

Research, Development, Testing, and EvaluationH.R. 3671 would provide $72.4 billion for the DoD's research, development, testing, and evaluation (RDTE) efforts, a decrease of $2.5 billion below FY 2011 and a reduction of $2.9 billion from the president’s request.  This funding for basic and applied science research is specifically meant to advance the safety and success of current and future military operations, and help prepare our forces with the systems and equipment necessary to meet potential challenges down the road.

Defense Health programs: H.R. 3671 would provide $32.5 billion for DoD health programs, and increase of $1.1 billion above last year and $283 million above the president’s request.  Funding for health programs includes medical research on combat-related illnesses and injuries, including in areas such as brain trauma, cancer psychological health, hemorrhage control, and prosthetic research.

Contingency operations and Overseas Deployment: The bill would also provide $115.1 billion in emergency contingency funds for overseas deployment and ongoing operations to fight the global war on terrorism, especially in Iraq and Afghanistan.  Emergency overseas contingency funding would be a decrease of $43 billion below FY 2011 due to the drawdown of U.S. forces overseas.  Compared to the president’s request, contingency funding would be an reduction of $2.8 billion.  Emergency contingency funding would provide additional amounts for the same accounts as the base bill, including military personnel, operations and maintenance, procurement and research, with all the funding going directly to overseas operations. 

Guantanamo Bay Detainees:  H.R. 3671 would prohibit funding for transfers of Guantanamo detainees to the U.S. or its territories, prohibits funding to modify any facility in the U.S. to house detainees, and places conditions on the release of detainees to other countries. These provisions are virtually identical to language contained in the FY 2011 Defense Appropriations legislation.

 

DIVISION B—Energy & Water

The bill would provide a total of $32 billion in non-emergency, discretionary budget authority for the agencies and programs funded through the Energy and Water Development Appropriations Subcommittee. The bill represents an increase of $328 million or 1 percent above FY 2011.  Division B would provide funding for the Army Corps of Engineers, the Department of Energy, the Bureau of Water Reclamation, nuclear energy and waste disposal, technology loans, uranium enrichment, and the Strategic Petroleum Reserve. According to the Committee on Appropriations, priority was given to programs that support the nation’s security with security-related programs in this section receive an increase of $478 million, while non-security activities are decreased by $150 million compared to last year’s level.

Army Corps of Engineers: The bill would provide $5 billion for the Army Corps of Engineers, an increase of $145 million above last year’s level and $429 million above the budget request. 

Bureau of Reclamation: The bill would provide $1 billion in funding for the Department of Interior to provide funding for the Bureau of Reclamation, an increase of $26 million above the president’s request.

Department of Energy: The bill would provide a total of $25.8 billion for Department of Energy programs, a reduction of $4.9 billion below the president’s request.  According to the Committee on Appropriations, The bill will provide a total of $11 billion – $505 million above last year’s level – for DOE’s nuclear security programs, including Weapons Activities, Nuclear Nonproliferation, and Naval Reactors. The bill would also include $1.8 billion – the same as last year’s level – for programs to help lower the cost of renewable energy technologies and to develop new technology. The bill would include $5.7 billion for environmental management activities, an increase of $31 million above last year’s level and $4.9 billion for science research, an increase of $46 million above last year’s level.

Additional Provisions: According to the Committee on Appropriations, other policy provisions in the legislation include:

  • A provision halting new light bulb efficiency standards;
  • A provision requiring new DOE hires to be verified through the “E-Verify” program;
  • A rejection of a Senate provision requiring energy efficiency regulation for TVs and set-top boxes;
  • A rejection of a Senate provision changing rules on how states set electricity prices;
  • Provisions preventing funds for federal contracts if the recipient has been convicted of a felony or if the recipient has unpaid federal tax liabilities; and
  • A termination of $181 million in funding for certain DOE loan guarantees, including terminating the program that granted funds to the failed company Solyndra.

 

DIVISION C—Financial Services

According to CBO, the bill would provide $21.52 billion for the Financial Services Subcommittee, a reduction of $424 million or 2 percent from FY 2011 levels.  The bill would provide funding for the Department of the Treasury, the White House, the Supreme Court, the District of Columbia (D.C.), the U.S. court system, the Federal Trade Commission, the General Services Administration, and the Small Business Administration.

Department of the Treasury:  The bill would provide $12.2 billion for the Department of Treasury, a decrease of $882 million below last year’s level and nearly $2 billion below the President’s request. Within this total, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) will receive $11.8 billion, $305 million below last year and $1.5 billion below the President’s request. The bill does not include any of the President’s requested increases for the IRS to implement Obamacare.

Executive Office of the President: The bill would provide $659 million for the Executive Office of the President, a reduction of $47 million below last year and $81 million below the President’s request.

The Judiciary: The bill would provide $6.5 billion for the Federal Courts, which is $55 million above last year’s level and $324 million below the President’s request.

District of Columbia: The bill would provide $665.6 million federal payment to the District of Columbia, which represents a reduction of $33 million from last year’s level and $51 million less than the request. The bill also includes $60 million, the full authorized level, for the SOAR Act, which includes the D.C. Opportunity Scholarship program.

Small Business Administration (SBA):  The bill would provide $919 million for the SBA, an increase of $189 million above last year.

Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC): The bill would provide $1.3 billion for the SEC, which is $136 million over last year’s level and $86 million below the President’s request. The legislation also rescinds $25 million from the new Dodd-Frank mandated “reserve fund” for the SEC for programs that Congress has not approved.

Additional Provisions: According to the Committee on Appropriations, other policy provisions in the legislation include:

  • A prohibition against the use of federal funds for abortion within federal employee health benefits.
  • A prohibition of certain Administration “Czars” originally included as part of H.R. 1. The bill would specifically prohibiting funding for Czars related to health care, climate change, the auto industry, and urban affairs;
  • The rejection of Senate proposals to mandate new regulations through the Consumer Product Safety Commission;
  • A prohibition on both federal and local funding for abortions in the District of Columbia;
  • A termination of the Office of National Drug Control Policy Youth Media Campaign for a savings of $35 million compared to FY 2011;
  • A government-wide prohibition on requiring contractors to disclose federal campaign contributions when submitting an offer for a federal contract;
  • An extension of a provision allowing the U.S. Postal Service to defer certain benefit payments until August 1, 2012;
  • Additional transparency measures requiring the Administration to report on its regulatory reform efforts, costs related to the Dodd-Frank law, and the Judgment Fund; and
  • A prohibition on funds for the Federal Trade Commission to report on the marketing of food to children unless they conduct a cost-benefit analysis.

 

DIVISION D—Homeland Security

The bill would provide $39.6 billion in non-emergency discretionary budget funding for Homeland Security, a reduction of $2 billion or 5 percent from FY 2011 levels.  This division would provide funding for a number of agencies, including the Secret Service, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), the Transportation Security Administration (TSA), Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), the Coast Guard, and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). The following is a summary of the spending highlights and other provisions in the bill.

Departmental Management and Operations:  The bill would provide $1.15 billion for Department of Homeland Security (DHS) management and operations, a reduction of $75 million below the president’s request. 

U.S. Customs and Border Protection Expenses:  The bill would provide $11.7 billion for the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) an increase of $362 million over last year’s level.  CBP is responsible for preventing and deterring threats along U.S. borders or at ports. According to the Committee on Appropriations, This funding provides for a total of 21,370 Border Patrol agents and 21,186 CBP officers (sustaining the highest staffing levels in CBP’s history), additional training and canine units at ports of entry, inspection and detection technology, and Air and Marine operations and procurement.

Immigration and Customs Enforcement:  The bill would provide $5.9 billion for ICE, which is $50 million more than last year’s level. ICE is the lead federal agency responsible for immigration and customs law and enforcement.

USCG:  The bill would provide $10 billion for the U.S. Coast Guard, which is $86 million above last year’s level. This funding provides for maritime safety and security activities, counternarcotics enforcement, facilities and equipment maintenance, and overseas contingency operations including operations in the Persian Gulf.

FEMA:  The bill would provide $4.7 billion in regular, base discretionary funding for FEMA, a decrease of $2.9 billion from last year’s level.  The bill would also include $2.4 billion in discretionary funding for FEMA First Responder Grants, $1 billion below last year’s level.  This funding is addition to the fully offset $6.4 billion in emergency funding for the FEMA disaster relief fund.

TSA:  The bill would provide $7.8 billion for the Transportation Security Administration (TSA), an increase of $153 million over last year’s level and $274 million below the President’s request. The bill would provde for 46,000 full time screening personnel.

 

DIVISION E—Interior & Environment

The bill would provide $29.17 billion in non-emergency, discretionary funding for the agencies and programs funded through the Interior and Environment Appropriations bill.  Budget authority in the bill would be a reduction of approximately $384 million or 1.3 percent below the spending level for FY 2011. This division would provide funding for a number of agencies, including the Department of Interior (DOI), the EPA, the Forest Service, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), the National Park Service, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Indian Health Service, the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) and the Smithsonian.  The following is a summary of the spending highlights and other provisions in the bill.

Bureau of Land Management:  The bill would provide $1.1 billion for Bureau of Land Management (BLM), which is a decrease of $5 million below last year’s level. The BLM oversees approximately 245 million acres of federal land and an additional 700 million acres of subsurface mineral rights.  Surface lands under direct Bureau management make up about 13 percent of the total land surface of the United States and more than 40 percent of all land managed by the Federal government, making the Bureau the nation's largest single land manager.  In addition, the Bureau has trust responsibilities on 56 million acres of Indian trust lands for mineral operations and cadastral surveys.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife:  The bill would provide $1.5 billion for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS), a reduction of $28 million below last year’s level.  FWS manages approximately 150 million acres of specially restricted federal land in the National Wildlife Refuge System tasked with conserving fish and wildlife.

National Park Service:  The bill would provide $2.6 billion for the National Park Service (NPS), a reduction of $32 million below last year’s level.

Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA):  The bill would provide $2.5 billion for BIA, and increase of $30 million above the president’s request. BIA provides services directly or through contracts, grants, or compacts to more than 550 federally recognized tribes with a service population of about 1.7 million American Indians.

Environmental Protection Agency:  The bill would provide $8.4 billion for the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), which is a $233 million reduction below the FY 2011 enacted level and $524 million below the President’s request. According to the Appropriations Committee, overall, funding for EPA has been reduced by $1.8 billion (-18.4%) in calendar year 2011.

Additional Provisions: According to the Committee on Appropriations, other policy provisions in the legislation include:

  • A provision directing the Department of Interior to expedite permit approval for new offshore energy production;
  • A provision to reduce litigation on grazing issues;
  • A provision to renew and streamline grazing permits; and
  • A provision to exempt livestock producers from overly burdensome greenhouse gas
  • regulations;
  • A provision requiring the President to submit a report to Congress on all federal spending for climate change programs in FY 2011; and
  • A provision prohibiting the implementation or enforcement of the “Wild Lands” Secretarial Order, which would allow the Department of Interior to make changes to federal land designations without congressional involvement

 

DIVISION F—Labor/HHS/Education

The bill would provide $156.3 billion for the Labor and Health and Human Services Subcommittee, a reduction of $1.1 billion or 1 percent from FY 2011 levels.  This division would provide funding for the Department of Labor, the Department of Health and Human Services, the Department of Education, and a number of other agencies, including the Corporation for Community Service and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. 

Department of Labor: The bill would provide a total of $14.5 billion in discretionary funding for the Department of Labor, an increase of $145 million above FY 2011 and a reduction of $251 million below the president’s request.  Funding would include $10.7 billion for the Employment Training Administration (ETA) and $1.7 billion for the Job Corps.

Health and Human Services:  The bill would provide a total of $69.7 billion in discretionary funding for the Department of Health and Human Services, a reduction of $700 million from FY 2011 and $3.4 billion below the president’s request. Funding includes $6.5 billion for Health and Human Services Administration, $6.1 billion for the Centers for Disease Control, $30.7 billion for the National Institutes of Health, $29.2 billion for the Administration for Children and Families, and $3.9 billion for the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS).   The bill would continue the long-standing restrictions on abortion funding that have been included in the LHHS Appropriations legislation in prior years.

Department of Education:  The bill would provide a total of $71.3 billion for the Department of Education, a reduction of $153 million below FY 2011 and $9.3 billion below the president’s request.  The bill would include $14.5 billion for Title I Grants to local school districts, a continuation of the current maximum Pell Grant level of $5,550, and $11.6 billion for Special Education programs.  The bill would also eliminate funding for the president’s “Race to the Top” initiative.

Corporation for Public Broadcasting: The bill would provide $445 million in advanced appropriations for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB) for FY 2014, a reduction of $6 million from FY 2011.

Additional Provisions: According to the Committee on Appropriations, other policy provisions in the legislation include:

  • A ban on funding for needle exchange programs – a provision that had been included in the bill until FY 2010;
  • A prohibition on the implementation of the H-2B Wage Methodology rulemaking;
  • A prohibition on the continued development of the musculoskeletal disorders reporting requirement, otherwise known as the “ergonomics” regulation;
  • A prohibition on the implementation or enforcement of DOL’s “coal dust” rule until an independent assessment of the integrity of the data and methodology behind the rule is conducted;
  • A prohibition on the National Labor Relations Board from implementing electronic voting procedures, preserving the integrity of the secret ballot election;
  • A prohibition on the entire Department of Health and Human Services from activities that advocate or promote gun control – previously this prohibition only applied to CDC.

 

DIVISION G—Legislative Branch

The bill would provide $4.3 billion for the Legislative Branch Subcommittee, a reduction of $234 million or 5.2 percent from FY 2011 levels. This division would provide funding for a number of legislative agencies, including all House staff and expenses, the Capitol Police, the House-portion of funding for the Architect of the Capitol (AOC), the Library of Congress (LOC), the Government Printing Office (GPO), the Congressional Research Service and the Government Accountability Office (GAO).

House of Representatives:  The bill would provide $1.2 billion for the House of Representatives, a reduction of $85.7 million or 6 percent below FY 2011 and $108 million or 8 percent below the president’s request.  Spending reductions in the bill include cuts from FY 2011 levels to individual Member, Committee, and Leadership office budgets. Counting this reduction, total funding for the House of Representatives has been reduced by more than 10% since the beginning of the new Republican majority.

Architect of the Capitol:  The bill would provide $567 million the AOC, a reduction of $32.9 million below FY 2011.  The funds support AOC general administration, Historic Buildings Revitalization Trust Fund, Capitol building maintenance, Capitol grounds, House office buildings and grounds, the Capitol power plant, the Capitol Visitors Center and the Botanic Garden.

Capitol Police: The bill would provide funding for the Capitol Police at last year’s level of $340 million, which is a reduction of $47.5 million below the president’s request.

 

DIVISION H—Military/Veterans

The Conference Report would provide $71.7 billion for the Military Construction and Veterans Affairs Subcommittee, a reduction of $1.4 billion or 2 percent from FY 2011 levels. In addition, the legislation would provide $52.5 billion in advance appropriations for VA medical accounts in FY 2013, an increase of $1.9 billion or 4 percent above the advanced appropriations for FY 2012. This division would provide funding for Department of Defense Construction, Military Family Housing, the Veterans Benefits Administration, the Veterans Health Administration, and related agencies.

Military Construction:  The bill would provide $13.1 billion for military construction projects, a decrease of $3.5 billion below last year’s level and $1.7 billion below the President’s request.  The bill would provide funding for Military Family Housing Construction at $1.7 billion.

Veterans Affairs (VA):  The bill would provide $58 billion in discretionary funding for the Department of Veterans Affairs, and increase of $2.1 billion above FY 2011.  The funding for the VA would provide VA compensation and benefits, pensions, education benefits, vocational rehabilitation, life insurance, and housing loan programs. Including mandatory funding, total FY 2012 VA funding would reach $122.2 billion, according to the Appropriations Committee.

 

DIVISION I—State/Foreign Operations

The Conference Report would provide $42.14 billion for the State and Foreign Operations Subcommittee, a reduction of $6 billion or 12.5 percent from FY 2011 levels and $8.7 billion below the President’s request. In addition to the non-emergency discretionary funding in this division, the bill would provide $11.2 billion in funding for overseas contingency operations and other ongoing operations related to the global war on terrorism. 

State Department Operations and Related Agencies: The bill would provide $13.2 billion in discretionary funding for operational costs of the State Department and related agencies, a reduction of $2.6 billion below last year’s level and $1.8 billion below the President’s request.

Bilateral and Multilateral Assistance: The bill would provide $21.3 billion for bilateral and multilateral assistance, a decrease of $2.2 billion below last year and $4.9 billion below the President’s request.

International Security Assistance: The bill would provide $7.3 billion in discretionary funding for international security assistance, a decrease of $847 million from last year’s level and $953 million from the President’s request.  The bill would provide $3 billion to fund the United States-Israel Memorandum of Understanding.

USAID: The bill would provide $1.3 billion for United States Agency for International Development (USAID), a reduction of $258 million from last year’s level and $476 million below the President’s request.

Overseas Contingency Operations/Global War on Terrorism: The bill would provide $11.2 billion in OCO/GWOT funding for the extraordinary and temporary costs related to programs and operations in Iraq, Afghanistan, and Pakistan, counterterrorism activities, and refugee and humanitarian assistance in conflict zones.

 

COST

According to CBO, the bill would provide a total of $914.9 billion in non-emergency discretionary budget authority for the nine appropriations bills, including $518.1 billion for Defense, $32 billion for Energy & Water, $21.5 billion for Financial Services, $39.6 billion for Homeland Security, $29.2 billion for Interior & Environment, $156.3 billion for Labor/HHS/Education, $4.3 billion for Legislative Branch, $71.7 billion for Military/Veterans, and $42.1 for State/Foreign Operations.  In addition to regular appropriations for the Department of Defense, the bill would provide $115.1 billion in emergency contingency funds for overseas deployment and ongoing operations to fight the global war on terrorism.

 

H.R. 3672—Disaster Relief Appropriations Act, 2012

Floor Situation

On Friday, December 16, 2011, the House is scheduled to consider H.R. 3672, the Disaster Relief Appropriations Act, 2012, under a rule.  The bill was originally introduced on December 14, 2011, by Rep. Harold Rogers (R-KY), and referred to the Committee on Appropriations.

Summary

H.R. 3672 would provide emergency disaster relief funding for FY 2012 which would be offset with a 1.83 percent across-the-board reduction in regular discretionary appropriations, provided for in accompanying legislation (H.Con.Res. 94).

According to CBO, the bill would provide $8.6 billion in emergency disaster relief for the Federal Emergency Management Agency, Army Corps of Engineers and the Social Security Administration for their efforts to combat waste, fraud and abuse. The bill would provide $6.4 billion for the FEMA Disaster Relief Fund (DRF). This includes funding for fire assistance, emergency declarations, major disasters, surge operations, and disaster readiness support. The bill would also include $1.7 billion in funding for disaster recovery assistance through the Army Corps of Engineers.  Finally, the bill would provide no more than $483 million to the Social Security Administration for continuing disability reviews.

 

Funding under the bill is in keeping with emergency disaster funding limits established by the Budget Control Act (S. 365).  Under the BCA, The Budget Control Act of 2011 adjustments to discretionary spending limits are allowed for “emergency” appropriations, disaster funding, appropriations to reduce waste and abuse in Social Security disability and health care funding, and appropriations for the global war on terrorism.  The bill limits the definition of the term “emergency” spending as unanticipated funding provided for “the prevention or mitigation of, or response to, loss of life or property, or a threat to national security.”  In addition, the BCA allows Members the opportunity during the legislative process to offset the spending with other cuts.

COST

According to CBO, the legislation will provide $8.6 billion in funding.

 

H.Con.Res. 94—Directing the Clerk of the House of Representatives to make corrections in the enrollment of H.R. 3672

Floor Situation

On Friday, December 16, 2011, the House is scheduled to consider H.R. 3672, the Disaster Relief Appropriations Act, 2012, under a rule.  The bill was originally introduced on December 14, 2011, by Rep. Harold Rogers (R-KY), and referred to the Committee on Appropriations.

Summary

H.Con.Res. 94 would offset emergency disaster relief funding for FY 2012 by providing an across-the-board cut of 1.83 percent to all FY 2012 base discretionary spending, excluding Department of Defense, Military Construction, and Veterans Affairs. The bill would require the Director of the Office of Management and Budget to submit a report to Congress specifying the account and amount of each rescission made pursuant to this legislation within 30 days on enactment.

COST

According to CBO, this legislation would reduce spending by $8.6 billion in FY 2012

 

Cost

According to CBO, the bill would provide a total of $914.9 billion in non-emergency discretionary budget authority for the nine appropriations bills, including $518.1 billion for Defense, $32 billion for Energy & Water, $21.5 billion for Financial Services, $39.6 billion for Homeland Security, $29.2 billion for Interior & Environment, $156.3 billion for Labor/HHS/Education, $4.3 billion for Legislative Branch, $71.7 billion for Military/Veterans, and $42.1 for State/Foreign Operations.  In addition to regular appropriations for the Department of Defense, the bill would provide $115.1 billion in emergency contingency funds for overseas deployment and ongoing operations to fight the global war on terrorism.