H.R. 1933: A Child Is Missing Alert and Recovery Center Act

H.R. 1933

A Child Is Missing Alert and Recovery Center Act

Date
July 14, 2009 (111th Congress, 1st Session)

Staff Contact
Sarah Makin

Floor Situation

H.R. 1933 is being considered on the floor under suspension of the rules, requiring a two-thirds majority vote for passage on July 14, 2009. This legislation was introduced by Rep. Ron Klein (D-FL) on April 2, 2009. The bill was referred to the House Committee on the Judiciary, which took no official action.

Bill Summary

H.R. 1933 requires the Attorney General to make a grant to the A Child Is Missing Alert and Recovery Center.  The bill specifies the following uses of funds:

  • To operate and expand the A Child Is Missing Alert and Recovery Center to provide services to federal, State, and local law enforcement agencies to promote the quick recovery of a missing child in response to a request from such agencies for assistance by utilizing rapid alert telephone calls, text messaging, and satellite mapping technology;
  • To maintain and expand technologies and techniques to ensure the highest level of performance of such services;
  • To establish and maintain regional centers to provide both centralized and on-site training and to distribute information to federal, State, and local law enforcement agency officials about how to best utilize the services provided by the A Child Is Missing Alert and Recovery Center;
  • To share appropriate information with the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, the AMBER Alert Coordinator, the Silver Alert Coordinator, and appropriate federal, State, and local law enforcement agencies; and
  • To assist the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, the AMBER Alert Coordinator, the Silver Alert Coordinator, and appropriate Federal, State, and local law enforcement agencies with education programs.

The bill authorizes $5 million for each fiscal year from Fiscal Year 2010 through Fiscal Year 2015.

Background

A Child Is Missing (ACIM) is a Fort Lauderdale-based non-profit organization founded in 1997, created because no community-based program existed for locating missing children, the disabled and elderly often (with Alzheimer's) during the crucial first hours of disappearance.

Current financial support comes from special events, sponsorship, private, corporate donations, State and federal funding. Appropriations from each state are used to help maintain the program in that state.

Cost

A CBO analysis is not yet available.