H.R. 1853, To direct the President to develop a strategy to obtain observer status for Taiwan in the International Criminal Police Organization

H.R. 1853

To direct the President to develop a strategy to obtain observer status for Taiwan in the International Criminal Police Organization

Date
November 2, 2015 (114th Congress, 1st Session)

Staff Contact
Communications

Floor Situation

On Monday, November 2, 2015, the House will consider H.R. 1853, a bill to direct the President to develop a strategy to obtain observer status for Taiwan in the International Criminal Police Organization, under suspension of the rules.  H.R. 1853 was introduced on April 16, 2015 by Rep. Matt Salmon (R-AZ) and was referred to the Committee on Foreign Affairs, which ordered it reported by unanimous consent on May 21, 2015.

Bill Summary

H.R. 1853 requires the President to develop strategy to obtain observer status for Taiwan in the International Criminal Police Organization (INTERPOL) and at other related meetings, activities, and mechanisms thereafter.  The bill also instructs INTERPOL Washington to officially request observer status for Taiwan and actively urge its member states to support such status.  The bill also requires the President to report to Congress, not later than 30 days after enactment, on efforts that have been made to encourage this status for Taiwan and describe actions that will be taken to obtain such status.

Background

INTERPOL is the world’s largest international police organization, with 190 member countries.  The organization connects law enforcement agencies worldwide so that they can securely communicate, share and access vital police information whenever and wherever needed, and ensure the safety of the world’s citizens.  INTERPOL also enables global access to police data and information and provides operational support on specific priority crime areas.[1]  Taiwan enjoyed full membership in INTERPOL from 1964 to 1984, but was removed when the People’s Republic of China (PRC) applied for membership.[2]

According to the bill sponsor, “Taiwan’s observer status would promote stability and security in the Asia Pacific region and assist Taiwan in protecting the safety of its citizens by combatting criminal activity through access to INTERPOL’s global police communications systems.”[3]

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[1] http://www.interpol.int/About-INTERPOL/Overview
[2] See Press Release—“Chairman Matt Salmon Introduces Legislation to Allow Taiwan Entrance to INTERPOL,” April 16, 2015.
[3] Id.

Cost

The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) estimates that implementing H.R. 1853 would cost less than $500,000 over the 2016 to 2020 period. Pay-as-you-go procedures do not apply to this legislation because it would not affect direct spending or revenues.

Additional Information

For questions or further information please contact Jerry White with the House Republican Policy Committee by email or at 5-0190.