H.R. 1471: To expand the boundary of the Jimmy Carter National Historic Site in the State of Georgia, to redesignate the unit as a National Historical Park, and for other purposes

H.R. 1471

To expand the boundary of the Jimmy Carter National Historic Site in the State of Georgia, to redesignate the unit as a National Historical Park, and for other purposes

Sponsor
Rep. Sanford D. Bishop Jr.

Date
October 26, 2009 (111th Congress, 1st Session)

Staff Contact
Communications

Floor Situation

The House is scheduled to consider H.R. 1471 on Monday, October 26, 2009, under suspension of the rules, requiring a two-thirds majority vote for passage. H.R. 1471 was introduced on March 12, 2009, by Rep. Sanford Bishop (D-GA) and referred to the Committee on Natural Resources, which held a mark-up and reported the bill, as amended, by unanimous consent, on September 30, 2009.

Bill Summary

H.R. 1471 would expand the boundary of the Jimmy Carter National Historic Site in Plains, Georgia, by approximately 30 acres. The bill would allow the Secretary of Interior to accept land by purchase or donation. The bill would also change the name of the site to the Jimmy Carter National Historic Park.

Background

The Jimmy Carter National Historic Site was established in 1987 as a means to preserve the boyhood home of President Jimmy Carter. According to House Report 111-307, the site encompasses the Plains railroad depot that served as the headquarters of the 1976 Carter presidential campaign and Plains High School serves as the park's visitor center. The legislation would authorize the National Park Service (NPS) to obtain a number of other properties in the area to add to the park, including the Billy Carter Service Station Museum, the Georgia Welcome Center, and a former home of Jimmy and Rosalynn Carter. According to CBO, the NPS would likely spend about $17 million acquiring new land and maintaining the property, including $10 million for rehabilitating buildings, about $1 million to purchase new land, and $2 million each year to maintain the property. CBO also says that H.R. 1471 does not include private-sector mandates because NPS indicates that it expects to acquire properties through purchase or donation.

Cost

According to CBO, H.R. 1471 would "cost about $17 million over the next five years."