H.R. 136, To designate the facility of the United States Postal Service located at 1103 USPS Building 1103 in Camp Pendleton, California, as the "Camp Pendleton Medal of Honor Post Office"

H.R. 136

To designate the facility of the United States Postal Service located at 1103 USPS Building 1103 in Camp Pendleton, California, as the "Camp Pendleton Medal of Honor Post Office"

Date
March 1, 2016 (114th Congress, 2nd Session)

Staff Contact
John Huston

Floor Situation

On Tuesday, March 1, 2016, the House will consider H.R. 136, to designate the facility of the United States Postal Service located at 1103 USPS Building 1103 in Camp Pendleton, California, as the “Camp Pendleton Medal of Honor Post Office,” under suspension of the rules. H.R. 136 was introduced on January 6, 2015 by Rep. Darrell Issa (R-CA) and was referred to the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, which ordered the bill reported by unanimous consent on October 9, 2015.

Bill Summary

H.R. 136 designates the United States Postal Service facility located at 1103 USPS Building 1103 in Camp Pendleton, California, as the “Camp Pendleton Medal of Honor Post Office”.

Background

The Medal of Honor is the nation’s highest military award for bravery. It is awarded by the President in the name of Congress. For this reason, it is often referred to as the Congressional Medal of Honor. Since it was first presented in 1863, the medal has been awarded 3,512 times to 3,493 recipients. Nineteen individuals have been double recipients of the award.[1]

The Marine Corps Base in Camp Pendleton, California has had numerous Marines who were stationed at the Camp receive the Medal of Honor. They include:

  • First Lieutenant John V. Power, who was awarded the medal posthumously in 1944 by President Franklin Roosevelt, for his service as platoon leader, during the landing and Battle of Namur Island, Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands on February 1, 1944;
  • Major Robert Dunlap, who was awarded the medal in 1945 by President Harry Truman for his service as Commanding Officer of Company C, First Battalion, Twenty-Sixth Marines, Fifth Marine Division, in action against enemy Japanese forces during the seizure of Iwo Jima in the Volcano Islands on February 20-21, 1945;
  • Private First Class Albert Schwab, who was awarded the medal posthumously in 1946 by Rear Admiral J. J. Clark, for his service as a Flame Thrower Operator in action against enemy Japanese forces on Okinawa Shima on one of the Ryukyu Islands on May 7, 1945;
  • Second Lieutenant Sherrod Skinner, Jr., who was awarded the medal posthumously in 1953 by Vice President Richard Nixon, for his service as an Artillery Forward Observer in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of October 26, 1952; and
  • Staff Sergeant Karl Taylor, who was awarded the medal posthumously in 1971 by President Nixon, for his service as Company Gunnery Sergeant during Operation MEADE RIVER in the Republic of Vietnam on the night of December 8, 1968.

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[1] See CRS Report, “Medal of Honor: History and Issues,” August 18, 2015.

Cost

A Congressional Budget Office (CBO) cost estimate is currently not available.

Additional Information

For questions or further information please contact John Huston with the House Republican Policy Committee by email or at 6-5539.