H.R. 1315, to amend section 1105(a) of title 31, United States Code, to require that annual budget submissions of the President to Congress provide an estimate of the cost per taxpayer of the deficit

H.R. 1315

To amend section 1105(a) of title 31, United States Code, to require that annual budget submissions of the President to Congress provide an estimate of the cost per taxpayer of the deficit

Committee
Budget

Date
October 20, 2015 (114th Congress, 1st Session)

Staff Contact
Communications

Floor Situation

On Tuesday, October 20, 2015, the House will consider H.R. 1315, a bill to amend section 1105(a) of title 31, United States Code, to require that annual budget submissions of the President to Congress provide an estimate of the cost per taxpayer of the deficit, under suspension of the rules.  H.R. 1315 was introduced on March 4, 2015 by Rep. Luke Messer (R-IN) and was referred to the Committee on the Budget.

Bill Summary

H.R. 1315 requires that the President’s annual budget submission to Congress include an estimate of the cost-per-taxpayer of the deficit for each year the budget is projected to result in a deficit.  The legislation also makes a technical correction to the numbering of the underlying statute.

Background

According to the Congressional Budget Office (CBO), the federal budget deficit will total $435 billion in Fiscal Year 2015.[1]  Assuming that current laws remain generally unchanged, CBO projects that the budget shortfall will decline to $414 billion next year, but then rise substantially, to $1 trillion in 2025.[2]  CBO estimates that the cumulative deficit between 2016 and 2025 will be $7 trillion.[3]

On February 6, 2013, the House approved language nearly identical to H.R. 1315 as an amendment to H.R. 444, the Require a PLAN Act, by voice vote.  On March 5, 2013, the House debated and passed an identical bill (H.R. 668) by a vote of 392 to 28.  The Senate did not act on either bill during the 113th Congress.

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[1] See CBO Report—“Monthly Budget Review for September 2015,” October 7, 2015.
[2] See CBO Report—“An Update to the Budget and Economic Outlook: 2015 to 2025,” August 2015, at 2 and 3.
[3] Id. at 4.

Cost

A Congressional Budget Office (CBO) cost estimate is currently unavailable.

Additional Information

For questions or further information please contact Jerry White with the House Republican Policy Committee by email or at 5-0190.