H.R. 1192, To redesignate Mammoth Peak in Yosemite National Park as "Mount Jessie Benton Fremont”

H.R. 1192

To redesignate Mammoth Peak in Yosemite National Park as "Mount Jessie Benton Fremont”

Date
July 14, 2014 (113th Congress, 2nd Session)

Staff Contact
Communications

Floor Situation

On Monday, July 14, 2014, the House will consider H.R. 1192, To redesignate Mammoth Peak in Yosemite National Park as “Mount Jessie Benton Fremont, under suspension of the rules.  H.R. 1192 was introduced on March 14, 2013 by Rep. Tom McClintock (R-CA) and was referred to the House Natural Resources Committee.  The bill was marked up on March 13, 2014 and was ordered reported by unanimous consent.[1]

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[1] House Committee Report 113-401.

Bill Summary

H.R. 1192 redesignates Mammoth Peak in Yosemite National Park as “Mount Jessie Benton Fremont,” and may be known informally as “Mt. Jessie” in honor of the contributions of Fremont to the approval of the Yosemite Grant.

Background

Jessie Benton Fremont, daughter of U.S. Senator Thomas Hart Benton of Missouri, married John C. Fremont, who had been assigned to explore the West.[2]  She “transformed John C. Fremont’s descriptions from his treks into prose that was used by pioneers to guide their route West.”[3]

After moving with her husband to Bear Valley, California in 1858, Fremont “realized the need to preserve the land that would become Yosemite National Park for future generations.”[4]  Fremont approached prominent individuals, urging them to begin the process that ultimately led to the establishment of Yosemite.[5]  She “influenced President Abraham Lincoln to sign the Act . . . commonly known as the Yosemite Grant, the first instance of land being set aside specifically for its preservation and public use by a national government,” and “set the foundation for the creation of national parks and California State parks through her advocacy for and influence on the Yosemite Grant.”[6]

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[2] H.R. 1192.
[3] Id.
[4] Id.
[5] Id.
[6] Id.

Cost

According to CBO estimates, implementing H.R. 1192 would not have a significant impact on the federal budget.  In addition, the bill would not affect direct spending or revenues.

Additional Information

For questions or further information contact the GOP Conference at 5-5107.