H.R. 1071: a bill to specify the size of the precious-metal blanks that will be used in the production of the National Baseball Hall of Fame commemorative coins

H.R. 1071

a bill to specify the size of the precious-metal blanks that will be used in the production of the National Baseball Hall of Fame commemorative coins

Date
April 24, 2013 (113th Congress, 1st Session)

Staff Contact
Communications

Floor Situation

On Tuesday, April 23, 2013, the House is scheduled to consider H.R. 1071, a bill to specify the size of the precious-metal blanks that will be used in the production of the National Baseball Hall of Fame commemorative coins, under a suspension of the rules.  The bill was introduced on March 12, 2013 by Rep. Richard Hanna (R-NY) and referred to the Committee on Financial Services.

Bill Summary

H.R. 1071 is a technical correction to the National Baseball Hall of Fame Commemorative Coin Act (P.L. 112-152).  The bill clarifies that the gold and silver commemorative coins are to be struck on blanks having a diameter of .85 inches and 1.5 inches, respectively, as opposed to the final coins having such diameters.

Background

On October 26, 2011, the House passed H.R. 2527, the National Baseball Hall of Fame Commemorative Coin Act, by a recorded vote of 416 – 3 (Roll Call #812); it was signed into law by the President on August 3, 2012.  The law directs the Secretary of the Treasury to mint commemorative coins in honor of the 75th anniversary of the National Baseball Hall of Fame.  The law also calls for the design to be domed, with a convex and concave side, a first for the U.S. Mint.

The Mint found that when the center of the coin is pushed out, the edges of the coin draw in, which results in a final coin that has a diameter a few thousandths of an inch smaller than that which is specified in the law.  To meet the sizing requirements in the law, the Mint would have to order custom coin blanks rather than use the standard coin blank.  Seeing as this would bring a large added cost, the Mint has requested that the law be changed so they can continue to use the standard coin blank.

Cost

There is no cost estimate currently available.