H.Con.Res 89, Expressing the Sense of Congress that a carbon tax would be detrimental to the United States economy

H.Con.Res. 89

Expressing the Sense of Congress that a carbon tax would be detrimental to the United States economy

Committee
Ways and Means

Date
June 9, 2016 (114th Congress, 2nd Session)

Staff Contact
Communications

Floor Situation

On Thursday, June 9, 2016, the House will begin consideration of H.Con.Res.89, expressing the sense of Congress that a carbon tax would be detrimental to the United States economy, under a rule. The bill was introduced on October 29, 2015, by Rep. Steve Scalise (R-LA) and was referred to the Committee on Ways and Means.

Bill Summary

H.Con.Res 89 expresses the sense of Congress that a carbon tax would be detrimental to American families and businesses and is not in the best interest of the United States.

 

Background

A study by the National Association of Manufacturers found a carbon tax would: have a negative effect on consumption, investment and jobs; increase the cost of coal, natural gas and petroleum products thus resulting in higher production costs and less spending on non-energy goods; and lead to lower real wage rates, lower labor productivity, and decrease workers’ incomes.[1]

According to the bill’s sponsor, “A national energy tax would cripple America’s economy, raise electricity bills, and cost families more money when they fill up at the pump. I’m glad that nearly two dozen free-market groups have joined the growing army that supports my legislation to halt President Obama’s proposed job-killing carbon tax. Since day one, the Obama Administration has waged an all-out war against American energy, and I’m proud that House Republicans have fought them every step of the way. I will continue to do everything in my power to combat this President’s radical and misguided global warming agenda.”

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[1] See Economic Outcomes of a U.S. Carbon Tax, National Association of Manufacturers, February 26, 2013, 1-4.

Cost

A Congressional Budget Office (CBO) estimate is currently not available.

Additional Information

For questions about amendments or further information on the bill, contact Jake Vreeburg with the House Republican Policy Committee by email or at 5-0190.