H.Con.Res. 86: Authorizing the use of Emancipation Hall in the Capitol Visitor Center for the unveiling of a bust of Sojourner Truth

H.Con.Res. 86

Authorizing the use of Emancipation Hall in the Capitol Visitor Center for the unveiling of a bust of Sojourner Truth

Sponsor
Rep. Sheila Jackson-Lee

Date
April 22, 2009 (111th Congress, 1st Session)

Staff Contact
Communications

Floor Situation

H.Con.Res. 86 is expected to be considered on the floor of the House on Wednesday, April 22, under a motion to suspend the rules, requiring a two-thirds majority vote for passage. This resolution was introduced by Rep. Shelia Jackson-Lee (D-TX) on March 30, 2009, and referred to the Committee on House Administration, which took no official action.

Bill Summary

H.Con.Res. 86 would authorize the use of Emancipation Hall in the Capitol Visitor Center (CVC) for a ceremony to unveil a bust of Sojourner Truth on Wednesday, April 28, 2009. The physical preparations for the ceremony would be required to be carried out in accordance with any conditions prescribed by the Architect of the Capitol.

Background

Emancipation Hall is the gathering place in the center of the 580,000 square foot Capitol Visitor Center (CVC). The hall, which features 30-foot ceilings and large skylights that offer visitors a view of the Capitol dome, is available for events, but only if a resolution is passed to allow its use.

The resolution would authorize the use of the hall for a ceremony to unveil a new bust of Sojourner Truth, a 19th century African-American human rights advocate and former slave. Born in 1797, Sojourner Truth was a slave in New York until 1826. In 1843, Sojourner Truth devoted her life to traveling the country in an effort to fight for human rights. According to her official website, "This illiterate ex-slave was a powerful figure in several national social movements, speaking forcefully for the abolition of slavery, women's rights and suffrage, the rights of freedmen, temperance, prison reform and the termination of capital punishment." Sojourner Truth eventually settled in Battle Creek, Michigan, and continued to travel the country and worked to relocate former slaves after the Civil War until her death in 1883.

 

Cost

A CBO score for H.Con.Res. 86 was not available at press time. However, the resolution does not authorize any spending.