H.Con.Res. 145: H.Con.Res 145, Calling for universal condemnation of the North Korean missile launch of December 12, 2012.

H.Con.Res. 145

H.Con.Res 145, Calling for universal condemnation of the North Korean missile launch of December 12, 2012.

Date
December 31, 2012 (112th Congress, 2nd Session)

Staff Contact
Communications

Floor Situation

On 2012, the House is scheduled to consider H.Con.Res. 145 under a suspension of the rules requiring a two-thirds majority vote for passage. The bill calls for the universal condemnation of the North Korean missile launch of December 12, 2012. 

Bill Summary

H.Con.Res. 145 expresses the sense of Congress that: (1) the North Korean missile launch of December 12, 2012, represents a flagrant violation of specified U.N. Security Council resolutions; (2) North Korea continues to defy the U.N., its Six-Party partners, and the international community; (3) the member nations should immediately impose sanctions covered by such resolutions and censure North Korea; and (4) all current restrictions against North Korea, including sanctions that ban the importation into the United States of North Korean goods, should remain in effect until North Korea no longer engages in activities that threaten U.S. interests and global peace.

Background

On December 12, 2012 North Korea launched its Unha-3 rocket, claiming that it was part of a peaceful space program to place an observation satellite in orbit.

 

According to the New York Times, “intelligence officials and rocket scientists affiliated with the South Korean Defense Ministry said through the rocket launching, North Korea was testing a ballistic missile that could fly more than 6,200 miles, with a warhead of about 1,100 to 1,300 pounds, putting the West Coast of the United States in range.”

 

U.N. Security Council resolutions ban North Korea, a U.N. member; from any rocket launching that uses ballistic missile technology.  The U.N. has mandated economic sanctions aimed at blocking North Korea from acquiring or proliferating nuclear and missile technology.  According to the New York Times, “analysts have long suspected that Iran and North Korea were closely cooperating in their missile and nuclear programs, sharing components and test data.”

Cost

No cost estimate is available.