H. Con. Res. 129, Expressing support for the goal of ensuring that all Holocaust victims live with dignity, comfort, and security in their remaining years, and urging the Federal Republic of Germany to reaffirm its commitment to this goal through a financial commitment to comprehensively address the unique health and welfare needs of vulnerable Holocaust victims, including home care and other medically prescribed needs, as amended

H.Con.Res. 129

Expressing support for the goal of ensuring that all Holocaust victims live with dignity, comfort, and security in their remaining years, and urging the Federal Republic of Germany to reaffirm its commitment to this goal through a financial commitment to comprehensively address the unique health and welfare needs of vulnerable Holocaust victims, including home care and other medically prescribed needs, as amended

Date
June 7, 2016 (114th Congress, 2nd Session)

Staff Contact
Molly Newell

Floor Situation

On Tuesday, June 7, 2016, the House will consider H. Con. Res. 129, Expressing support for the goal of ensuring that all Holocaust victims live with dignity, comfort, and security in their remaining years, and urging the Federal Republic of Germany to reaffirm its commitment to this goal through a financial commitment to comprehensively address the unique health and welfare needs of vulnerable Holocaust victims, including home care and other medically prescribed needs, as amended, under suspension of the rules. The bill was introduced on April 21, 2016, by Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (R-FL) and was referred to the Committee on Foreign Affairs which ordered the bill reported, as amended, by Unanimous Consent on May 18, 2016.

Bill Summary

H.Con.Res. 129 states that the House, and the Senate concurring, supports the goal of ensuring all Holocaust victims are able to live with dignity, comfort and security in their remaining years. The resolution acknowledges Germany’s financial and moral commitment over the past seven decades to provide a measure of justice for Holocaust victims and urges Germany to continue to reaffirm its commitment by ensuring that every victim receives all of the prescribed medical care, home care, mental health care, and other vital services necessary to live in dignity.

 

Background

It is estimated that there are at least 100,000 Holocaust victims living in the United States and approximately 500,000 living around the world today, including child survivors. Thousands of Holocaust victims live in poverty, cannot afford and do not receive sufficient medical care, home care, mental health care, medicine, food, transportation, and other vital life-sustaining services. Holocaust victims often lack family support networks and require social worker-supported case management in order to manage their daily lives and access government funded services.

According to the sponsor, “Germany is a close U.S. ally, and since the 1950s, it has accepted its moral responsibility to Holocaust survivors. However, even by its own admission, the German government’s efforts to address the medical, mental and home care needs of all Holocaust survivors have been woefully inadequate. Nearly half of all survivors worldwide live at or below the poverty level and have little time to continue to wait for the bureaucracy and cut through the red tape. Survivors deserve better than that; they deserve to live out their days in dignity and comfort…”[1]

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[1] See Press Release, “Ros-Lehtinen’s Bipartisan Measure Urging Germany to Honor Its Obligations, Fully Fund Holocaust Survivors’ Medical, Mental and Home Care Needs Passes Out of Foreign Affairs Committee,” May 18, 2016.

Cost

A Congressional Budget Office estimate is unavailable.

Additional Information

For questions about amendments or further information on the bill, contact Molly Newell with the House Republican Policy Committee by email or at 2-1374.